Friday, April 17, 2009

Blossom Toes - If Only For a Moment (1969)

Mp3\101Mb
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They never had any commercial success in the U.K. or the U.S., but Blossom Toes were one of the more interesting British psychedelic groups of the late '60s. Starting as the Ingoes, just another of thousands of British R&B/beat bands of the mid-'60s, the group hooked up with legendary impresario Giorgio Gomelsky (early mentor of the Stones and manager of the Yardbirds and Soft Machine, among others) in 1966. Gomelsky changed their name and put them on his Marmalade label. Their 1967 debut LP was miles away from R&B, reflecting an extremely British whimsy and skilled, idiosyncratic songwriting more in line with Ray Davies. After some personnel changes, the group released their second (and final) album a couple years later. Another extremely accomplished work, it was markedly different in character than their first effort, showing a far more sober tone and heavier, guitar-oriented approach. The group broke up at the end of the decade; members Brian Godding and Brian Belshaw formed the equally obscure B.B. Blunder, and Godding became active on the fringes of the British experimental rock scene.

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1 Peace Loving Man 4:50 2 Kiss Of Confusion 4:37 3 Listen To The Silence 3:424 Love Bomb 8:345 Billy Boo The Gunman 7:026 Indian Summer 5:507 Just Above My Hobby Horse's Head 8 Wait AMinute 5:38
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Brian Belshaw: Bass, Vocals
Jim Cregan: Lead, rhythm guitars, Vocals
Brian Godding: Lead and rythm guitars, Piano, Organ, Vocals
Poli Palmer: Drums on "Peace Loving Man"
Barry Reeves: Percussion & Drums on all tracks except "Peace Loving Man"
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Brian Godding and Jim Cregan were still Blossom Toes' chief songwriters on their second album, but the LP stands in bold contrast to their debut in sound and attitude. Having scuttled the orchestras and developed their chops in the two-year interlude, the record bears the influence of heavy California psychedelia and Captain Beefheart with its intricate, interwoven guitar lines and occasional gruff dissonance. The more serious instrumental approach spills over to the lyrics, which are somber and at times even gloomy, occasionally reflecting the social turbulence of the late '60s, with their uncertain tenor and references to ominous "peace loving men" and "love bombs." Far less uplifting than their debut, the weighty approach is leavened by the close harmonies and sparkling guitar interplay. While not as memorable as the first album, it's above-average late-'60s psychedelia that almost acts as the downer flip side to the stoned, happy-face ambience of their early work.
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