Monday, December 14, 2009

Golden Earring - Golden Earring 1970/ Seven Tears 1971


Mp3\170Mb
*****
From Jancy
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Golden Earring (aka Wall of Dolls)

Golden Earring found the titular Dutch quartet forging the unique style that would later pay off in successful albums like Moontan and Cut. At this point, the group's sound is best described as post-psychedelic FM rock with a pronounced hard rock element (strong, gutsy guitar riffs about on this record -- just check out "The Loner" or "Back Home"). A lot of the songs have the atmosphere and elaborate arrangements associated with prog rock, but the group keeps the arrangements and the running times tight (the album's lengthiest song is just a little over six minutes). The most overtly artsy track on the album is "Big Tree, Blue Sea," an energetic and complex rock tune that includes Jethro Tull-style flute and packs a dizzying array of tempo and stylistic changes into a tune only half as long as the average prog tune. Other highlights on Golden Earring include "This Is the Time of the Year," a song whose effect arrangement juxtaposes quiet verses with spare instrumentation with dramatic chorus powered by a powerful guitar riff and "Back Home," a solid example of the kind of good-time rocker that would dominate Golden Earring's late-'70s albums. The big problem for the group at this juncture is the lyrics: "I'm Gonna Send My Pigeons to the Sky" is an earnest but muddled stab at protest music whose lyrics fail to say much of anything and the powerful riffing of "The Loner" is undone by cartoonish, melodramatic lyrics. However, the strong music and the band's tight musicianship make up for this problem and Golden Earring remains a tight, tuneful effort that is well worth a listen for Golden Earring's fans.

Seven Tears 2 in 1

Seven Tears finds Golden Earring continuing to develop its distinctive blend of hard rock and prog elements, but the end result is not as consistent as 1970's Golden Earring. The big problem this time out is that the group's adventurous genre-hopping tendencies don't always result in strong songs: "Silver Ships" is a soft, science fiction-influenced song that generates a potent atmosphere but lacks the strong arrangement and sense of dynamics that would allow it to take flight, and "You're Better Off Free" loses sight of its catchy tune with a lengthy midsection guitar jam that derails an otherwise interesting song. Despite these problems, Seven Tears shows a band willing to take big risks to transform its combination of elements into a totally unique style. When this alchemy works, the results are quite good: "The Road Swallowed Her Name" effectively blends a heavy guitar riff worthy of Black Sabbath with psychedelic lyrics and percussion, and "Hope" generates the down-and-out feeling of its lyrics with a descending saxophone riff guaranteed to stick in the listener's head. The album's highlight is "She Flies on Strange Wings," an art rock epic that combines verses done in a stomping, heavy metal style with spacy choruses and a slow, dreamy midsection that is strongly reminiscent of Pink Floyd. Overall, Seven Tears is more like a collection of songs than a fully realized album, but there are enough strong moments to make it worthwhile for hardcore Golden Earring fans.
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01 - Golden Earring - Yellow And Blue
02 - Golden Earring - The Loner
03 - Golden Earring - This Is The Time Of The Year
04 - Golden Earring - Big Tree Blue Sea
05 - Golden Earring - The Wall Of Dolls
06 - Golden Earring - Back Home
07 - Golden Earring - See See
08 - Golden Earring - I'm Going To Send My Pigeons To The Sky
09 - Golden Earring - As Long As The Wind Blows

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10 - Golden Earring - Silver Ships
11 - Golden Earring - The Road Swallowed Her Names
12 - Golden Earring - Hope
13 - Golden Earring - Don't Worry
14 - Golden Earring - She Flies On The Strange Wing
15 - Golden Earring - This Is The Orther Side Of Life
16 - Golden Earring - You're Better Off Free

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