Saturday, February 28, 2009

The Mascots - Best of (1964-68) Sweden

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The Mascots were a fairly successful Swedish sixties group, issuing around twenty singles and two LPs between 1964 and 1968, and reaching the Swedish Top Ten with five of their 45s. Although they wrote much of their own material, most of their output was extremely imitative of British Invasion pop, and they (like virtually all Swedish acts of the time) were unknown to the English-speaking world. However, if you're on the hunt for lightweight, but sometimes charming, pseudo-Merseybeat, the Mascots made some pretty enjoyable (and some extremely awkward) tracks along those lines. In particular, the ultra-catchy, close-harmony number "Words Enough to Tell You" is a gem of the genre. As it made #6 in Sweden in 1965 and was included in the best and most widely circulated compilation of Swedish 1960s rock (Searchin' for Shakes), it's the Mascots track non-Swedes are most likely to be familiar with. Alas, none of their other recordings were up to this level, although "A Sad Boy" (another Swedish Top Tenner) and a few other mid-1960s cuts were fair mock Merseybeat. The 1966 single "I Want to Live" was proof that they could get a little tougher and weirder, and has been included on some compilations of rare "freakbeat, " but this direction wasn't explored by the band on other efforts. The Mascots' grasp of English (which they sang in exclusively) was slighter than that of some other Swedish groups, and this—combined with some corny Nordic folk-influenced Merseybeat on some early recordings, and some dull middle-of-the-road pop-folk-rock on their late 1960s releases—makes a compilation of their output erratic and hard to sit through in its entirety.
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1. I like my bike 2. Lyckan 3. Baby baby 4. Call me your love 5. A sad boy 6. When I return 7. Stones fell 8. Goodbye 9. For him 10. Walking with my angel 11. Tip of my tongue 12. My very best 13. Words enough to tell you 14. Woman 15. Nobody crying 16. We should realize 17. I don't like you 18. I want to live 19. This proud crowd 20. I close your eyes 21. The girl that you are 22. Did you ever think 23. That's you 24. Since you broke my heart 25. Stewball 26. You could be my friend 27. Tell me lady 28. Moreen 29. Baby, you're so wrong 30. Black and white 31. You're never gonna find me 32. A life like that
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The Druids of Stonehenge - Creation (1968)

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David Budge - vocals
Carl Hauser - guitar, vocals, keyboard
Steve Tindall - drums, keyboard
Billy (B. T.) Tracy - guitar
Tom Paine Workman - bass
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The Druids of Stonehenge's sole LP was exceptionally moody garage psychedelia paced by the vocals of Dave Budge, whose snarling blues-rock style owed a great deal to Mick Jagger and perhaps some other British Invasion singers like Van Morrison. As was the case for many garage band singers, Budge could be a little over the top in his derivativeness, sometimes sounding as if he was adding a pinch of Screamin' Jay Hawkins' overwrought camp to the mix (and even covering Hawkins' signature piece, "I Put a Spell on You"). Though the majority of the material is original, this too is quite indebted to the Rolling Stones, though pretty rudimentary in comparison to the classics the Stones themselves were spinning out in the mid-'60s. In quite a few of these respects, the Druids of Stonehenge were similar to one of the best Stonesy U.S. garage groups, the Chocolate Watchband, except — to be frank — the Chocolate Watchband were considerably superior. At times the Druids do break out of the mold, particularly with the gothic Baroque psychedelia of "Six Feet Down" — easily the best track — and the somewhat Love-like "Forgot to Be Begot," which unlike most of the material foregrounds airy West Coast psych-folk-rock-like harmonies. Overall, however, it's a record where the surliness of the attitude impresses more than the actual quality of the material.
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Creation of Sunlight - Creation of Sunlight (1968)

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Creation of Sunlight's sole album is a second- or third-division piece of late-'60s southern California psychedelia, although it's not unenjoyable in places. Certainly it will recall the Strawberry Alarm Clock to many seasoned psychedelic listeners, as this too has a combination of thick organ and fuzz guitar, as well as material and vocal harmonies that are a rather lighter shade than the arrangements. It really helps that the lead singing is breezier and a bit higher than that of many similar groups. The background harmonies have a fullness that smacks not just of the Strawberry Alarm Clock, but of a few other bands of their time and place, like Clear Light and (at its poppiest) the Association; the material can also bring to mind some aspects of the West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band. And then there's that part of "Second Thoughts" where it veers off from a fairly sunny harmony number and suddenly sounds like the organ player's trying to imitate Ray Manzarek...so no, it's not the most individual of albums, even among obscure cult psychedelic ones. But even in the absence of truly fine songs, it's considerably better than the normal such derivative record of its time and place, with a likable trippy-if-safe optimism that's too heavy to be sunshine pop, though too lightweight to qualify as serious underground boldness.
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The Creation - How Does It Feel To Feel (1966-68)

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Biography
by Bruce Eder & Richie Unterberger
They could've been contenders — hell, they should've been contenders! That's the first thought that passes through one's head as one hears the early singles by the Creation — and, indeed, how they weren't contenders is astonishing. They had it all, the in-house songwriting, the production, the voices, and the sound that should've put them right up there with the Who and ahead of the Move and Jimmy Page, among others. Their lead guitarist, Eddie Phillips, was even asked by Pete Townshend to join the Who as their second guitarist. But thanks to an unaccountable weakness in their British sales — as opposed to their German chart action, which was downright robust — and some instability in their lineup, they were ... Read More...
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01. How Does It Feel To Feel02. Life Is Just Beginning03. Through My Eyes04. Ostrich Man05. I Am The Walker06. Tom Tom07. The Girls Are Naked08. Painter Man09. Try And Stop Me10. Biff! Bang! Pow!11. Making Time12. Cool Jerk13. For All That I Am14. Nightmares15. Midway Down16. Can I Join Your Band17. Uncle Bert18. Like A Rolling Stone [1]19. If I Stay Too Long20. Hey Joe [2]
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Unquestionably the best of the several Creation repackages floating around. Includes virtually all of their 1966-1968 singles and a few other stray tracks of interest from the same period.
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Friday, February 27, 2009

The Beach Boys - Little deuce coupe (1963)

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Little deuce coupe (1963)
1- little deuce coupe 2- ballad of ole Betsy 3- Be true to your school 4- car crazy cutie 5- cherry cherry coupe 6- 409 7- shut down 8- spirit of america 9- our car club 10- no go showboat 11- a young man 12-custom machine 13-i get around
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Reviewby Richie Unterberger
Little Deuce Coupe was a concept album of sorts, in that most of the songs had something to do with cars and hot rod culture. That's a pretty thin train of thought to sustain for most of a record. What's worse, by the Beach Boys' own standards of hot rod tunes, most of the tracks are pretty trite and unimaginative, rating among their worst early material. Not only that, the three best cuts — "Little Deuce Coupe," "409," and "Shut Down" — had already been issued on LP. The most noteworthy of the other tracks was the Top Ten hit "Be True to Your School," whose fine tune and arrangement are marred by breathtakingly sappy lyrics of faith and loyalty to one's high school. (The album version, oddly, is different from the superior single, which had the Honeys adding female cheerleader chants.) "Spirit of America" and "A Young Man Is Gone" (a James Dean tribute with Four Freshmen-style vocals) are moderately interesting numbers, but on the whole this is probably the worst early Beach Boys album, with the possible exception of Surfin' Safari (and their 1964 Christmas LP, which doesn't really count). [Little Deuce Coupe/All Summer Long, a Capitol two-fer CD, combines this and Little Deuce Coupe onto one disc, adding the 45 version of "Be True to Your School," alternate takes of "Little Honda" and "Don't Back Down," and the previously unreleased "All Dressed Up for School."]
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Wednesday, February 25, 2009

The Factory - Complete Story! (1966-1969)

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Biography by Richie Unterberger
The Factory recorded two psychedelic singles in the UK in the late 1960s—unnoticed at the time, now fetching more than a hundred pounds among collectors—that combined psychedelia with power pop harmonies. They were discovered by Brian Carroll, an engineer in one of London's leading studios, IBC. With his colleague Damon Lyon Shaw, he was looking to enter production, so they cut their teeth on the youthful Factory, whose three members included a sixteen-year-old drummer and seventeen-year-old guitarist. Their first single, "Path Through the Forest," was a respectable piece of hard psychedelia with commendably creative guitar and vocal distortion, came out on MGM in the UK in late 1968.
The Factory's only other single, "Try a Little Sunshine," was written for them by John Pantry (a songwriting friend of Carroll), and issued by CBS in late 1969. It sounded a little like a mating of the Who and the Moody Blues (in the best sense of that combination), with its crunching guitar chords and catchy, wistful vocal harmonies. Like its predecessor, it was heard by few, and the group disbanded shortly afterward. That was too bad, as they had considerable promise considering their youth and the quality of their two 45s. Both sides of their two singles, as well as a couple of unreleased demos, were assembled for the Path Through the Forest mini-CD in 1995.
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18 Tracks
Stand-Out Tracks:
"Path Thru the Forest""Gone""Try a Little Sunshine""Red Chalk Hill""The Old and the New"
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Review
by Richie Unterberger
There can't be many other 1960s bands whose output totaled two flop singles that have been honored with a bootleg. Yet this one materialized for the Factory, and in common with many bootlegs, it's at once useful for its excavation of a mound of obscure material of interest to fanatical collectors, and irritating for its substandard packaging and (at times) sound. Both sides of the two official Factory 45s are here, along with the demos "Mr. Lacey" and "Second Generation Woman." All half-dozen of those tracks previously appeared on Bri-Tone's CD-EP Path Through the Forest, but Complete Story! adds 13 more cuts. The catch is that just one of them, the "original long version" of "Path Through the Forest," is actually a recording by the Factory. Filling out the disc are seven songs from the singles by Peter & the Wolves; both sides of the Norman Conquest 45; and three numbers by the Bunch, two of them done for the BBC. What's the connection between the Factory, Peter & the Wolves, the Norman Conquest, and the Bunch? The CD sleeve doesn't say a word about it. Granted, you shouldn't expect bootleggers to always go the whole nine yards in supplying such basic information, but not everyone has complete sets of back issues of Record Collector to fill in the gaps. Dedicated research reveals that both Peter & the Wolves and the Norman Conquest included the Factory's studio engineer, John Pantry, who also wrote the Factory B-side "Red Chalk Hill." As for the link between the Factory and the Bunch, it's been written that the Bunch was another name for Peter & the Wolves. To further muddy the picture, some Peter & the Wolves' 45 sides are not included here, though it's doubtful that too many people will get upset.So how's the music? Well, the Factory tracks are good second-division, British late-'60s psychedelia/freakbeat, particularly "Path Through the Forest" and "Try a Little Sunshine." The original long version of "Path Through the Forest," the one actual Factory cut not on the Path Through the Forest CD-EP, adds some yet freakier effects not heard on the official 45. Peter & the Wolves play much lighter pop-psychedelia than the Factory, with sunshine pop and bubblegum overtones, sometimes with a nice merry-go-round feel ("Little Girl" and "Lantern Light"), but sometimes in an unmemorable, lightweight fashion. The Norman Conquest single is yet more featherweight, late-'60s British flowery pop, though one of the sides, "Upside Down," benefits from some enchanting organ. The Bunch makes a decided upswing into moodier psychedelic rock on "Spare a Shilling" (both studio and BBC versions included) and the BBC performance of the group's spooky "Looking Glass Alice," though there was surely enough time for the studio version of that tune — one of the better '60s British psychedelic obscurities — as well. In all, this has some good late-'60s pop-psychedelia for the intensely devoted collector of the style, yet it's marred not just by the poor documentation, but also by uneven sound quality in which the volume levels fluctuate and some surface noise can be heard. Yes, it's a bootleg, but it could have been much more laudable with just a little more effort on the part of the perpetrators.
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THE ELECTRIC PRUNES - SINGLES - (1966-1969 )

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Biography
by Richie Unterberger
Though they got considerable input from talented L.A. songwriters and producers, with their two big hits penned by outside sources, the Electric Prunes did by and large play the music on their records, their first lineup writing some respectable material of their own. On their initial group of recordings, they produced a few great psychedelic garage songs, especially the scintillating "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night," which mixed distorted guitars and pop hooks with inventive, oscillating reverb. Songwriters Annette Tucker and Nancie Mantz wrote most of the Prunes' material, much of which in turn was crafted in the studio by Dave Hassinger, who had engineered some classic Rolling Stones... Read More...
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1 The Electric Prunes - Ain't It Hard 2:10 2 Electric Prunes - Little Olive 2:42 3 Electric Prunes, The - I Had too Much to Dream Last Night 2:54 4 The Electric Prunes - Luvin' 2:04 5 The Electric Prunes - Get Me To The World On Time 2:29 6 The Electric Prunes - Are you Loving Me More 2:24 7 Electric Prunes - Dr. Do Good 2:27 8 Electric Prunes - Hideaway 2:42 9 Electric Prunes - Long Day's Flight 3:12 10 The Electric Prunes - The King Is In The Counting House 2:00 11 Electric Prunes - The Great Banana Hoax 4:09 12 Electric Prunes - Wind-Up Toys 2:26 13 The Electric Prunes - You Never Had It Better 2:08 14 The Electric Prunes - Every Body Know You're Not In Love 2:59 15 Electric Prunes - Hey Mr. President 2:41 16 The Electric Prunes - Flowing Smoothly 3:01 17 Electric Prunes - Finders Keepers, Losers Weepers 3:25 18 Electric Prunes - Love Grows 4:02
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Thanks Valder

DR. Z - Tree Parts To My Soul (1971)

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Review
by Dave Thompson
In its original vinyl form, Dr. Z's Three Parts to My Soul rates among the most valuable British prog albums of all time. But it is a rarity among such rarities in that it is also as good as a high three-figure value leaves you hoping it would be. Dr. Z was discovered by Nirvana UK frontman Patrick Campbell-Lyons, who is also credited as executive producer on the album. But Three Parts could not be further from its mentor's taste for eclectic airiness. The dominant mood is of percussive keyboards, alternately majestic and militaristic, the sound, if you like, of a Keith Emerson harpsichord concerto if Carl Palmer matched him note for note on a kettle drum. The vocals, meanwhile, have that kind of bellowed edge of conviction which makes every lyric resonate like a profoundly meaningful motto. The first half of the near-singalong "Spiritus Manes et Umbra" moves like a battalion of tanks, with the LP's title itself rendered as compulsive a chant as any "gabba gabba hey" could be. There are moments of less-than-scintillating activity: the four-minute drum solo which punctuates that same song flags long before the chorus careens back into view, while "Summer for the Rose" is a ponderous snarling in desperate need of melody. At its most inventive and textured, however, Three Parts is an excellent example of early-'70s prog at its deepest and darkest, as inventive as it is occasionally magpie-like. "Burn in Anger," the most commercial song in sight, is a dead-ringer for a classic rock hit which will forever float just beyond your ability to name it, while the closing "In a Token of Despair" is a tour de force of Floydian winds, Crimson-ish signatures, and electifyingly symphonic structure. The Si Wan reissue concludes with two bonus tracks drawn from a similarly rare Dr. Z single released a year or so before the LP. Produced by the Pretty Things Dick Taylor, "Lady Ladybird" and "People in the Street" have little in common with the main attraction beyond a similar taste for crashing drums and keyboards; the world's first orchestral garage band.
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1.Evil Woman's Many Chid 2.Spiritus, Manes Et Umbra 3.Summer For The Rose 4.Burn In Anger 5.Too Well Satisfied 6.In A Token Of Despair
BONUS TRACKS:
7.Lady Lady Bird 8.People In The Street
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Thanks Valder

THE NEW COLONY SIX - AT THE RIVER'S EDGE ( 1966 )

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Biography
by Richie Unterberger
Chicago's New Colony Six originally emerged as a tough, British Invasion-styled outfit prominently featuring Farfisa organ and a novel (at the time) Lesley guitar. Scoring a huge local hit with "I Confess," their early recordings — exemplified by their 1966 debut album, Breakthrough — featured first-class original material that gave the sound of Them and the Yardbirds a more commercial, American garage-based, vocal harmony approach. The rest of the '60s saw the band gradually abandoning their roots for middle-of-the-road pop with horns and strings. Continuing to rack up major local hits and minor national ones, they finally cracked the U.S. Top 30 with "Love You So Much" (1968) and "Things I'd Like to Say" (1969).
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1. I confess 2. A heart is made of many things 3. Don't you think it's time you stopped your cryin' 4. Last nite 5. I and you 6. At the river's edge 7. I lie awake 8. Dawn is breaking 9. The time of the year is sunset 10.Some people think I'm a playboy 11.Cadillac 12.Sunshine 13.Love you so much 14.Let me love you 15.You're gonna be mine 16.Warm baby 17.Accept my ring 18.My dreams depend on you 19.I'm here now 20.Woman 21.The power of love 22.Mister you're a better man than I
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Thaks a lot Valder

RO-D-YS - THE COMPLETTE COLLECTION ( Netherlands)

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The Ro-d-ys were from the northern part of The Netherlands and were formed somewhere around 1965. The name Ro-d-ys was chosen after they heard there already was a band called The Rowdies.There very first single, released in 1966 flopped saleswise but got a lot of airplay. Their lucky break came with the follow up single "Take Her Home" in 1967. The succes continued with their best known single "Just Fancy" which was a hit late summer/early autumn 1967. In 1968 more quality singles were met with increasing lack of succes and after one more failed attempt with the beautiful and haunting single "Winter Woman" early 1969 the group called it quits. They released two albums, "Just Fancy"in 1967 and "Earnest Vocation" in 1968.If you like sixties rock with influences from The Beatles, The Kinks & The Yardbirds then this is it. This set is also perfect if you are a completist! All of The Ro-d-ys' singles, A- as well as B-sides and album tracks are collected on these two discs.The bonus tracks are from the post Ro-d-ys era when the group after a lean period hitwise fused with a Dutch group called Zen who had a similar style and also had gone through some hard times.
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1 You'd Better Take Care of You Rijnbergen 2:25 2 Take Her Home Rijnbergen 2:35 3 Just Fancy Rijnbergen 3:01 4 Nothing to Change a Mind Rijnbergen 2:29 5 Sleep Sleep Sleep Rijnbergen 3:06 6 Anytime Rijnbergen 3:12 7 Unforgettable Girl Rijnbergen 3:05 8 Earnest Vocation Rijnbergen 4:56 9 Winter Woman Rijnbergen 4:25 10 Hitch-Hiking Rijnbergen 2:38 11 Bad Babe Rijnbergen 2:12 12 My Woman Has Got Loose Rijnbergen 2:34 13 Waiting for a Cloud-Burst Rijnbergen 3:35 14 When You Hear This Song Rijnbergen 3:15 15 Just Go On Rijnbergen 2:52 16 Destination Rijnbergen 3:01 17 I Still Got You Rijnbergen 2:01 18 Let's Try Rijnbergen 2:26 19 Wrong Shoe Rijnbergen 2:10 20 Get Me Down 2:55
21 Take Me Down to the Riverside 2:49
22 Rosie 3:07
23 Rock & Roller 4:32
24 Wheels, Wheels, Wheels Rijnbergen 2:04 25 Only One Week Rijnbergen 2:01 26 Gods of Evil Rijnbergen 3:06 27 Stop Looking on a Deadlock Rijnbergen 2:51 28 Show Me by Candlelight Rijnbergen 2:31 29 Dr. Sipher Rijnbergen 3:16 30 Everytime a Second Rijnbergen 3:30 31 Isn't It a Good Time Rijnbergen 2:12 32 Looking for Something Better Rijnbergen 2:55 33 Love Is Almost Everywhere Rijnbergen 3:13 34 Robinetta Rijnbergen 3:03 35 No Place Like Home Rijnbergen 4:22 36 Easy Come, Easy Go Rijnbergen 2:38 37 Look for a Windchild Rijnbergen 2:36 38 Let It Be Tomorrow Rijnbergen 2:15 39 Peace Ants Rijnbergen 3:51 40 Flowers Everywhere Rijnbergen 2:53 41 Tomorrow Rijnbergen 2:32 42 You'd Better Take Care of You [alternate take] Rijnbergen 2:27 43 Wayfaring Stranger [*] Traditional 3:28
44 Let Me Try to Cry [*] Rijnbergen 4:10
45 Lifetime [*] Rijnbergen 3:27
46 Mysterious Ways [#/*] Lingbeek, Rijnbergen 4:23
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Thanks a lot
Valder

Timebox - Beggin' : The Sound Of London's Mod Club Scene

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Biographyby Jon 'Mojo' Mills
The roots of Timebox lay in local band Take 5 in 1965 in Southport, a small northern English coastal town (situated near Liverpool). After a succession of interpersonal incidents, which led to the vocalist quitting, the band was left in disorder. Fellow local act the Music Students (who featured 15-year-old drummer Peter Halsal, a great drummer who was also proving himself on a majesty of other instruments) were facing similar problems. Halsall, Chris Holmes (piano), and Kevan Foggerty (vocals) teamed up with Clive Griffits as Take 5 and, very soon after, turned professional and headed towards London. Taken under the wing of the ... Read More...
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1 I Wish I Could Jerk Like My U 2:04 2 I'll Always Love You 2:58 3 Soul Sauce 2:58 4 Waiting for the End [#] 2:23 5 Save Your Love 2:39 6 Your Real Good Thing Is About [#] 3:11 7 Come on Up 3:08 8 A Woman That's Waiting 2:57 9 Beggin' 2:50 10 Walking Through the Streets 2:51 11 Don't Make Promises 3:11 12 Girl, Don't Make Me Wait 2:33 13 Leave Me to Cry [#] 3:18 14 Gone Is the Sad Man 3:45 15 Eddie McHenry [#] 2:46 16 Barnabus Swain [#] H 2:49 17 Baked Jam Roll in Your Eye 3:23 18 Poor Little Heartbreaker 2:45 19 Stay There [#] 2:50 20 Country Dan and City Lil [#] 2:17 21 Love the Girl [#] 2:21 22 Tree House [#] 2:55 23 You've Got the Chance 3:52 24 Black Dog [#] 3:01 25 Yellow Van 2:51 26 Promises [#] 2:06 27 Timebox [#] Halsall, Patto 3:13
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Timebox Beggin' (2008 issue UK 27-track digitally remastered) CD album comprising essentially intelligent, genre-bending late '60s British Pop laced with a surreal sense of humor and regular flashes of maverick unpredictability. Mod Jazz/Pop outings and Blue Eyed Soul populate the first half of our complete overview, with Psychedelic nuggets and blasts of proto-Hard Rock (plus a few that defy categorization) inflecting the second - and all recorded within a two year span, with much of it unreleased at the time.

Timebox originally started at an art college in Southport when Peter Halsall, Clive Griffiths and Chris Holmes decided to swap their art for music. After trying out several vocalists, all of whom proved unsuitable, John Gee, manager of London’s famous Marquee Club, recommended, Mike Patto who was singing with the London Youth Jam Orchestra, a 24-piece big band at the club. Supposedly, Mike was asked to join the group after a jam session at the Playboy Club. Mike accepted the offer and started working with the band in mid 1967. They quickly became know as a "groups group", and their stage act garnered admiration from many of their contemporary musicians, who for obvious reasons are always the hardest to impress. This alone should attest to the musical skill and unique sound of the band's live performances.

In 1970 Patto was formed consisting of the remaining members of TimeBox, Mike Patto (vocals), John Halsey (drums), Ollie Halsall (guitars and vibes), and Clive Griffiths (bass), and was signed to the newly formed Vertigo label, they recorded their first album live in studio with producer Muff Winwood.

This release is actually quite similar in content to the 1998 collection The Deram Anthology, but with a crucial difference. Unlike that previous release, this includes both sides of their first two singles (both done for the Piccadilly label before they moved to Deram); the only track it's missing from The Deram Anthology is a cover of "Misty." It thus replaces The Deram Anthology as the most comprehensive Timebox compilation, including both sides of all seven of their singles, as well as a good 13 tracks that were unreleased in the '60s (though all of those previously appeared on The Deram Anthology).

The four Piccadilly cuts, unsurprisingly, are more oriented toward straight R&B-soul than their later work on Deram, including a blue-eyed soul number ("I'll Always Love You") and three instrumentals (among them a cover of Dizzy Gillespie's "Soul Sauce") with elements of soul, blues, Latin, and ska.

The other recordings show them, like many late-'60s British bands with similar roots evolving from soul-R&B roots to more progressive sounds that, if not quite all-out psychedelic, certainly showed the influence of the psychedelic era.

For all their reputation among audiences of the time and some collectors, none of this showed them making a leap to the fore as innovators in the way bands like, say, Procol Harum and Traffic with somewhat similar roots did. Their forte was heartfelt, wistful, blue-eyed soul-pop ballads; an attempt at Kinks-like whimsy ("Eddie McHenry") didn't work well, and their moves into harder rock-influenced directions weren't married to very memorable material.

That makes Timebox a talented but marginal part of the late-'60s British rock scene, but certainly there's never going to be more thorough documentation of their recordings than this anthology (review by Richie Unterberger - AMG).

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The Action - Action Packed (1965)

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Biographyby Bruce Eder
After the Beatles the Action were the most impressive band signed to EMI by George Martin during the mid-'60s. That they never managed to chart a single in the space of two years with the label, even as lesser bands sold tens of thousands of records with seemingly no effort, is one of those great ironies of mid-'60s English rock & roll. The band started out in North London during 1963 as quartet called the Boys, and cut one single as a backing band for Sandra Barry before getting their own shot at immortality on the Pye label with a single "It Ain't Fair." The Boys went out of existence in 1964, but didn't split up, instead reconfiguring themselves as a five-piece. The original lineup, Alan "Bam" King... Read More...
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01. Land Of 1000 Dances02. In My Lonely Room03. Harlem Shuffle04. I Love You (Yeah!)05. I'll Keep On Holding On06. Hey Sah-Lo-Ney07. Just Once In My Life08. Wasn't It You 09. Baby You've Got It10. Since I Lost My Baby 11. Never Ever 12. Twenty Fourth Hour13. The Place 14. Come On, Come With Me15. The Cissy 16. Something Has Hit Me17. Shadows And Reflections
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Review by Bruce Eder
Beginning in the fall of 1965 with their single "Land of 1000 Dances" b/w "In My Lonely Room," the Liverpool-based quintet the Action graced the world with some of the best R&B and soul ever to come out of a white British band, so utterly convincing and sung and played with such conviction that some listeners today can't believe they were white, much less English. They only got better with their next few singles, including "I'll Keep on Holding On," "Baby You've Got It" b/w "Since I Lost My Baby," and "Harlem Shuffle" (which wasn't even released until the 1980s), but somehow never made it to the charts. The 17 songs here overlap with the contents of the Ultimate Action CD, except that they've all been newly remastered in 24-bit sound from better sources, so the action on the drums is audible and the guitars, bass, and vocals are practically right in your lap (and they never sounded better, to boot). That new digital transfer, coupled with the extensive annotation and the array of group photographs, picture sleeves, advertising art, and original single labels all combine to make this CD an essential upgrade from the earlier release. Further, although it is a compilation of singles (and, thus, a bit unfair to stack up against individual albums by other bands), the music on Action Packed is every bit as essential, bracing, and enjoyable a listening experience as, say, With the Beatles, Rolling Stones Now, the Who's original U.K. My Generation album, or any of the other iconic music releases of the British Invasion. Even the one non-soul number here, Shadows and Reflections," which reflected a change in direction for the group and closes the collection (and also surfaced on Rhino's Nuggets II box), is one of the catchier unknown pieces of British psychedelic pop you're ever likely to run into
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The Attack - About Time! (1966-68)

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Biographyby Jon 'Mojo' Mills
The Attack (thanks to an ever growing legion of collectors dedicated to the vibrant sound of mid- to late-'60s Swinging London) have a far larger fan base now than they ever did during their existence. Indeed their unique brand of guitar-heavy, mod-rock qualifies them as one of the finest examples of (the over used term) freakbeat. Hence over the last 15 years there has been an abundance of vinyl bootlegs and inclusions on such psychedelic/freakbeat compilations as Rubble! The founders Richard Shirman (the only original member to stay with the group throughout all of the lineup changes) and Gerry Henderson were originally in a group called the Soul System... Read More...
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1 Any More Than I Do O'iList, Shirman 2:06 2 Feel Like Flying (Making It) DuCann 2:37 3 Created by Clive [#] Pattison 2:45 4 Try It Ballack, Levine 2:07 5 Go Your Way DuCann 2:45 6 Too Old DuCann 3:05 7 Colour of My Mind Shirman 2:30 8 Lady Orange Peel Shirman 2:28 9 Sympathy for the Devil [#] Jagger, Richards 4:48 10 Neville Thumbcatch Bain, Smith 3:03 11 Strange House Du Cann 4:10 12 Created by Clive Pattison 2:40 13 Mr Pinnodmy's Dilemma Du Cann 4:27 14 Come on Up [#] Cavaliere 2:49 15 Freedom for You Du Cann 2:36 16 Hi-Ho Silver Lining English, Lancer, Weiss 2:30 17 Magic in the Air (Aka Watch w Du Cann 3:38 18 Anything [#] Shirman 2:08 19 We Don't Know O'iList, Shirman 2:44
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Review by Jo-Ann Greene
They were an incredibly hot property at the time, especially in the local London clubs, yet even with two future Nice stars, an Atomic Rooster-to-be, and a member of Marmalade in their various ranks, the Attack failed to breach the British chart. Long gone but far from forgotten, the mods-cum-psychedelic rockers finally get their due with this sumptuous compilation. Amazingly, between the time the Attack first entered the studio in 1966 and their final recordings together in 1968, they shifted their lineup four times. Thankfully, the sleeve notes provide some assistance untangling their convulsive history, with the aid of an interview with frontman Richard Shirman, who also annotates all 16 of the tracks within. The Attack released only four singles during their all-too-brief lifespan, and both sides of all their 45s are included here, joined by a pair of numbers recorded during a BBC radio session and a clutch of unreleased studio recordings. As the songs are not presented chronologically, About Time! has a rather mishmash feel, bouncing willy-nilly around the years and lineups. It's worth pointing out then that the quirky story-song "Neville Thumbcatch" was recorded eight months before Cream's equally eccentric "Pressed Rat and Warthog" hit the shops! The Attack's assault on the scene came from a variety of musical directions that included splashy mod, shiny pop, hefty blues, assaultive rock, and aggressive psychedelia. And perhaps this was a small part of their problem — every time one turned around, the band had a new look and another sound. Still, the talent within their ranks was phenomenal, and with their keen ear for covers, a splendid sense of melody, and their own talents with a pen, the Attack should have won the day. They didn't back then, but the war's not quite over yet.
*******

V.A.- The In Crowd: UK Mod R&B Beat 1964-1967

Mp3\99Mb
*****
There's a decent amount of good stuff on this anthology, but it does represent the second to third rung of artists and tracks in this immensely exciting genre. It's something to investigate only after you've digested the Who, the Small Faces, Creation, and the Pretty Things, especially as there are no tracks by any of those groups on this 26-track anthology. And the songs by the biggest names are rather peripheral to their core discographies: The Yardbirds' "Stroll On" is the reworking of "The Train Kept A-Rollin'" that they did for the Blow-Up film, while the Spencer Davis Group's "Keep on Running" is a live radio version, not the original hit single. Getting past these considerations, almost everything here is fair to excellent British R&B-mod, including cuts by some of the better second-division acts on the scene (Brian Auger, Julie Driscoll, the Artwoods, John's Children, the Untamed, the Eyes, Graham Bond) and early recordings by some future superstars like Rod Stewart, Steve Howe (as part of the In Crowd), and David Bowie (as part of the Manish Boys). The Action's blue-eyed soul masterpiece "I'll Keep Holding On," Gary Farr & the T-Bones' R&B cover of Mongo Santamaria's "Get the Money," and Les Fleur Des Lys' "Mud in Your Eye," in fact, are great cuts, and John's Children's "The Love I Thought I'd Found" (also known as "Smashed Blocked") is mod on the verge of dissolving into psychedelia. "It's Alright," by the Rocking Vickers, is an oddity in that it's basically Pete Townshend's "The Kids Are Alright" with different lyrics and song structure (though Townshend still gets the songwriting credit). This is really more of a first purchase for listeners just beginning to investigate obscure mod music than one for the specialists, though, since many people interested in these sounds in the first place will already have many or most of the songs on other reissues. There's an extraordinary bonus, however: An enhanced CD track has a three-minute video clip from a 1964 documentary focusing on the Four + 1 (with future members of the psychedelic band Tomorrow), including a snippet of a live performance of Bo Diddley's "Nursery Rhyme." ~ Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide
******
1. Blow Up - In Crowd2. Stroll On - Yardbirds3. Shake - Stewart, Rod4. That's How Strong My Love Is - In Crowd5. Hey Hey Hey Hey - Farlowe, Chris & The Thunderbirds6. Keep On Running (live session) - Davis, Spencer Group7. Finger Poppin' - In Crowd8. Don't Lie To Me - Four Plus One9. I Take What I Want - Artwoods10. Get The Money - Farr, Gary & The T-Bones11. I'll Keep On Holding On - Action12. My Baby Is Gone - Untamed13. Take My Tip - Manish Boys14. Man With Money - Wild Uncertainty15. It's Alright - Rockin' Vickers16. I'm Rowed Out - Eyes17. Mud In Your Eye - Les Fleur De Lys18. Love I Thought I'd Found - John's Children19. You're On Your Own - In Crowd20. Can I Get A Witness - Steampacket21. Time Is On My Side - Four Plus One22. It's For You - Rupert & The Red Devils23. Tiger - Auger, Brian & The Trinity24. Don't Do It No More - Driscoll, Julie25. Big Boss Man (live) - Bond, Graham Organisation26. Slow Down (live session) - Episode Six
******

Monday, February 23, 2009

H.P. Lovecraft - Dreams in the Witch House (1967)

Mp3\194Mb
******
Featuring two strong singers (who often sang dual leads), hauntingly hazy arrangements, and imaginative songwriting that drew from pop and folk influences, H.P. Lovecraft was one of the better psychedelic groups of the late '60s. The band was formed by ex-folky George Edwards in Chicago in 1967. Edwards and keyboardist Dave Michaels, a classically trained singer with a four-octave range, handled the vocals, which echoed Jefferson Airplane's in their depth and blend of high and low parts. Their self-titled 1967 LP was an impressive debut, featuring strong originals and covers of early compositions by Randy Newman and Fred Neil, as well as one of the first underground FM radio favorites, "White Ship." The band moved to California the following year; their second and last album, H.P. Lovecraft II, was a much more sprawling and unfocused work, despite some strong moments. A spin-off group, Lovecraft, released a couple LPs in the '70s that bore little relation to the first incarnation of the band.
******
H.P. Lovecraft - Dreams in the Witch House (The Complee Philips Recordings)
03. I've Been Wrong Before04. Drifter05. That's the Bag I'm In06. White Ship07. Country Boy & Bleeker Street08. Time Machine09. That's How Much I Love You Baby (More or Less)10. Gloria PatriaH.P. Lovecraft II11. Spin, Spin, Spin12. It's About Time13. Blue Jack of Diamonds14. Electrollentando15. At the Mountains of Madness16. Mobius Trip17. High Flying Bird18. Nothing's Boy19. Keeper of the KeysBonus tracks20. Anyway That You Want Me21. It's All Over for You22. White Ship (Single Edit)23. Keeper of the Keys (Single Mix)
*******
Despite what another reviewer has said this album is a real gem. It has the clasic song 'The White Ship' on it for a start. This is an album that demands your attention. It is not mind candy . These guys in my opinion are up there with The Doors and the Byrds. This album is far more representative of the 'summer of love' than Sergeant Pepper as good as that album is.......... These guys were part of the Late John Peels Perfumed Garden Programme play list along with Captain Beefheart and Love. Spooky Classics, ideal FM radio fare, a cult band and a mystery. This album is well packaged and good value for money. Try some American Physcedelia and imagine being in San Francisco circa '67. MORE...
********

Bee Gees - Odessa (Special-Edition 3CD) (2009)

Mp3 VBR\215Mb
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Product DescriptionThree-disc expanded Deluxe Edition of Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb's 1969 double-LP pop masterpiece, presented in deluxe packaging that reproduces the original release's red-flocked cover, including a poster and sticker. Disc one features the original stereo mixes of the title's 17 song sequence. Disc two marks the U.S. recording debut of the original mono mixes of the same 17 songs. Bonus disc 3 boasts 22 previously unreleased recordings, including 20 alternate takes and demos plus two songs not featured on the original album-'Pity' and 'Nobody's Someone.'
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******
Tracklist:
Disc 1: stereo / Disc 2: mono
1. Odessa (City On The Black Sea) 2. You’ll Never See My Face Again 3. Black Diamond 4. Marley Purt Drive 5. Edison 6. Melody Fair 7. Suddenly 8. Whisper Whisper 9. Lamplight 10. Sound Of Love 11. Give Your Best 12. Seven Seas Symphony 13. With All Nations (International Anthem) 14. I Laugh In Your Face 15. Never Say Never Again 16. First Of May 17. The British Opera

Disc 3:
“Sketches afor Odessa” [all tracks previously unissued] 1. Odessa” (Demo) 2. You’ll Never See My Face Again”(Alternate Mix) 3. Black Diamond (Demo) 4. Marley Purt Drive (Alternate Mix) 5. Barbara Came To Stay 6. Edison (Alternate Mix) 7. Melody Fair (Demo) 8. Melody Fair (Alternate Mix) 9. Suddenly (Alternate Mix) 10. Whisper Whisper – Part Two (Alternate Version) 11. Lamplight (Demo) 12. Lamplight (Alternate Version) 13. Sound Of Love (Alternate Mix) 14. Give Your Best (Alternate Mix) 15. Seven Seas Symphony (Demo) 16. With All Nations (International Anthem) (Vocal Version) 17. I Laugh In Your Face (Alternate Mix) 18. Never Say Never Again (Alternate Mix) 19. First Of May (Demo) 20. First Of May (Alternate Mix) 21. Nobody’s Someone 22. Pity 23. Odessa Promotional Spot
*******
Thanks for my favorite site MELOMANnew.ru - owners links
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Sunday, February 22, 2009

New Musical Express- Poll Winners Concert III













































New Musical Express- Poll Winners Concert II





















































































New Musical Express- Poll Winners Concert I

Video online




New Musical Express- Poll Winners Concert 1963-64-65-66...




The New Musical Express (better known as the NME) is a popular music magazine in the United Kingdom which has been published weekly since March 1952. It was the first British paper to include a singles chart, which first appeared in the 14 November 1952 edition. The magazine's commercial heyday was during the 1970s when it became the best-selling British music magazine.


The paper's first issue was published on 7 March 1952 after the Musical Express and Accordion Weekly was bought by London music promoter Maurice Kinn, and relaunched as the New Musical Express. It was initially published in a non-glossy tabloid format on standard newspri. On 14 November 1952, taking its cue from the U.S. magazine Billboard, it created the first UK Singles Chart. The first of these was, in contrast to more recent charts, a top twelve sourced by the magazine itself from sales in regional stores around the UK. The first number one was "Here In My Heart" by Al Martino.




During the 1960s the paper championed the new British groups emerging at the time. The Beatles and The Rolling Stones were frequently featured on the front cover. These and other artists also appeared at the NME Poll Winners Concert, an awards event that featured artists voted as most popular by the paper's readers. The concert also featured an awards ceremony where the poll winners would collect their awards. The NME Poll Winners Concerts took place between 1963 and 1966. They were filmed, edited and then transmitted on British television a few weeks after they had taken place.
The latter part of the 1960s saw the paper chart the rise of psychedelia and the continued dominance of British groups of the time. During this period some sections of pop music began to be designated as Rock. The paper became engaged in a sometimes tense rivalry with its fellow weekly music paper Melody Maker, however NME sales were healthy with the paper selling as many as 200,000 issues per week which made it one of the UK's biggest sellers.


******




NME POLL WINNERS CONCERT "BIG BEAT" '64 1964 Apr-26-64. U.K. New Musical Express poll winners concert. The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Hollies, the Searchers, the Merseybeats, the Swinging Blue Jeans, Gerry and the Pacemakers, Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas, Joe Loss orchestra, Brian Poole and the Tremeloes, Manfred Mann, Jet Harris with Sounds Incorporated, Kathy Kirby, Big Dee Irwin, Joe Brown and the Bruvvers....




NME POLL WINNERS CONCERT 1965 Apr-11-65. U.K. New Musical Express poll winners concert. The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Searchers, the Moody Blues, Freddie and the Dreamers, Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames, the Seekers, Herman's Hermits, the Ivy League and Division Two, Sounds Incorporated, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, Cilla Black, Donovan, Them, the Animals, the Kinks.




NME POLL WINNERS CONCERT 1966 May-1-66. U.K. New Musical Express poll winners concert. Compered by disc jockeys Jimmy Savile and Pete Murray. Sounds Incorporated: "Hall of the Mountain King," "Zorba the Greek." The Fortunes: "This Golden Ring," "You've Got Your Troubles." Herman's Hermits: "She's a Must to Avoid," "You Won't be Leaving." Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich: "You Make it Move," "Hold Tight." The Yardbirds: "Train Kept-A-Rollin'," "Shapes of Things." Crispian St. Peters: "Send Me Some Lovin'," "The Pied Piper." The Alan Price Set: "Baby Workout," "I Put a Spell on You." Dusty Springfield (backed by the Echoes): "In the Middle of Nowhere," "You Don't Have To Say You Love Me," "Shake."




Note: British ABC-TV filmed this concert and then edited for TV broadcast. Other artists performed at this concert but were not on the televised show. And, in contrast to the previous two years, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones did not allow ABC-TV to film their performances.



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The Bush - 'Got Bush If You Want It (1965-66)

Mp3\150Mb

*******

The Bush - 'Got Bush If You Want It

Ugly Things' Bush CD (Got Bush If You Want It: The Savage Young Bushmen of Rialto, 1965-1966)

****
"In 1965-66, The Bush ruled the teen scene in California’s Inland Empire with smash hits on the local charts and throngs of fans flocking to their gigs. Originally called the Bushmen, they were the first band in their area with the longhaired Rolling Stones look. After they opened for the Stones in 1965 they became local superstars almost overnight" 'Got Bush If You Want It: The Savage Young Bushmen of Rialto, 1965-1966'

*******
1 Feeling Sad and Lonely 2:35 2 I Want Your Love 2:37 3 Hard to Find 2:48 4 Got Love If You Want It 2:45 5 To Die Alone 1:56 6 I'm Wanting Her 2:35 7 I Feel Good 2:15 8 Who Killed the Ice Cream Man? 2:23 9 It's Alright 2:36 10 What a Shame 2:20 11 Gonna Treat You Bad 2:16 12 Play with Fire 2:05 13 I Know 2:39 14 Heart of Stone 2:38 15 Sit Down, Shut Up (Don't Talk) 1:32 16 You're No Good 2:27 17 You Can't Do That 2:40 18 Don't You Fret 2:03 19 Mel's Truck Stop 3:03 20 Ain't That Lovin' You Baby 1:49 21 Evil Hearted You 2:14 22 Bring It on Home to Me 3:56 23 I Ain't Done Wrong 2:20 24 Every Night 2:52 25 Got Love If You Want It 3:02 26 Don't You Fret 1:58 27 Who Killed the Ice Cream Man? 2:06 28 Bonus Track 1:00

*****

Keith West- Excerpts From...Group and Sessions (1965-1974)

Mp3\139Mb


******


Granted, this 24-track anthology will appeal almost exclusively to those with very deep British '60s/psychedelic collections, gathering bits and pieces from every stage of his career. It's also true that the best work West did is not actually on here, but on the eponymous (and only) album by Tomorrow, which is still easily available on CD. As a supplement to that Tomorrow album, though, this is pretty good, including rare 1965 singles by his pre-Tomorrow groups, Four + 1 and the In Crowd (respectable if a bit generic mod/R&B); a couple of previously unreleased BBC Tomorrow airshots of songs from their album ("Three Jolly Little Dwarfs" and "Revolution"), presented in somewhat harder-rocking versions sans elaborate studio production; the "Teenage Opera" and "Sam" singles; a rare 1968 single; and some unreleased cuts from the late '60s and early '70s, which show him drifting from psychedelia into a more singer/songwriter direction. Especially noteworthy are two unreleased recordings that Tomorrow wrote and recorded for Michelangelo Antonioni's film Blow Up; Tomorrow were apparently considered for the cameo rock band role that eventually went to the Yardbirds. Interesting odds'n'sods from an interesting career.


******


1. Time Is on My Side - Keith West, 2. Don't Lie to Me - Keith West, 3. That's How Strong My Love Is - Keith West, 4. Things She Says - Keith West, 5. You're on Your Own - Keith West, Hopkins, Keith 6. I Don't Mind - Keith West, Brown, James [1] 7. Am I Glad to See You - Keith West, West, Keith 8. Blow Up - Keith West, West, Keith 9. Three Jolly Little Dwarfs - Keith West, Burgess, Ken 10. Revolution - Keith West, Howe, Steve 11. Excerpt from "A Teenage Opera" - Keith West, Hopkins 12. Sam - Keith West, Philwit & Pegasus 13. Shy Boy - Keith West, Burgess, Ken 14. Colonel Brown - Keith West, Burgess, Ken 15. On a Saturday - Keith West, West, Keith 16. The Kid Was a Killer - Keith West, West, Keith 17. The Visit - Keith West, West, Keith 18. She - Keith West, West, Keith 19. A Little Understanding - Keith West, 20. Power and the Glory - Keith West, 21. West Country - Keith West, 22. Riding for a Fall - Keith West, 23. Having Someone - Keith West,


*******


This 23 track Keith West compilation covers his recording career from 1965 to 1974, through early bands like "Four + 1" and "The In Crowd" , his short period of stardom as singer with Tomorrow and his world wide solo hit "Grocer Jack" from the never finished teenage opera and some solo recordings after the break-up of Tomorrow. --NEXT


*******


The Seeds - Raw & Alive&Rare Seeds (LIVE !!!)

Mp3\179Mb

*******
*******
01 - Introduction by 'Humble' Harv02 - Mr. Farmer03 - No Escape04 - Satisfy You05 - Night Time Girl06 - Up In Her Room07 - Gypsy Plays His Drums08 - Can't Seem To Make You Mine09 - Mumble Bumble10 - Forest Outside Your Door11 - 900 Million People Daily (All Making Love)12 - Pushin' Too Hard13 - Daisy Mae14 - The Other Place15 - Lose Your Mind16 - She's Wrong17 - Chocolate River18 - Sad And Alone19 - The Wind Blows Your Hair20 - Satisfy You21 - 900 Million People Daily (All Making Love) (Full Length Version)22 - Wildblood23 - Fallin' Off The Edge (Of My Mind)

****
Canned screams or no, Raw And Alive is probably the best Seeds record of all--propulsive, dextrous, alternatively angry and languid, and full of first-rate Sky Saxon songs. Half of the album [the first 12 tracks here] had appeared on no other Seeds' album when this record first appeared, and what a catch they are! "The Gypsy Plays His Drum" arguably out-abrasives Public Image Ltd. and can be a hard listen for some, but "Satisfy You", "900 Million People Daily", "Nighttime Girl" and "Forest Outside Your Door" proved as strong as earlier highlights and showed that despite the weaknesses of A Full Spoon of Seedy Blues, Saxon and company were far from played out. Even "Mumble and Bumble," noticeably weaker than the other new tracks, has one of the band's loveliest bridges. As for the familiar tracks, all are performed with zip and authority. The "rarities" here are mostly expendable, but the studio version of "Satisfy You" is included, along with "Lose Your Mind", a great Bo Diddley-beat song originally on The Seeds, and the extended studio recording of "900 Million People Daily". "The Wind Blows Your Hair", a late Seeds single, is perfectly nice, which is odd for the Seeds, and it would have been grand if the spooky alternate version had been included-- there is nothing quite like hearing Saxon sing, over an ominous melody line, "I've seen it happen time and again / Think you're alone on a road and then / It's all over, the race is won / By him, crowned Satan, Prince Satan again." Take the rarities tracks here as a bonus-- fine if the songs are good, like "Wind Blows Your Hair", expendable if not-- and concentrate on the true majesty of Raw And Alive.

****

The Seeds- Fallin' Off The Edge

Mp3\64


******


The title track to this collection of rarities and alternate takes, "Fallin' off the Edge (Of My Mind)," is, improbably enough, a psychedelic hoe-down. Literally. Sure, the lyrics are suitably mind-bending, but Jan Savage's guitar playing is pure country. It works in spite of itself, but is hardly representative of the rest of the material (it's the only song co-written by Kim Fowley). It also proves that, contrary to popular belief, the Seeds did have other musical interests beyond psych, garage, and blues. "Daisy Mae," the B-side to "Can't Seem to Make You Mine," is another oddity. In it, Sky Saxon (b. Richard Marsh) wraps his wavery, sandpaper-edged tenor around an R&B number that sounds like a cross between Buddy Holly and Little Richard. The other numbers adhere to a more traditional psych standard. They include alternate versions of "Wind Blows Your Hair" (plus a reprise), "Nobody Spoil My Fun," and "Pushin' Too Hard," their signature hit. Although there's no topping their first two releases, Seeds and Web of Sound, fans are sure to find Fallin' off the Edge of interest.


*****


1 Wind Blows Your Hair Saxon 2 Other Place Saxon 3 She's Wrong Saxon 4 Nobody Spoil My Fun Saxon 5 Fallin' off the Edge (Of My Mind) Fowley 6 Pretty Girl Johnson 7 Tripmaker Hooper, Tybalt 8 Chocolate River Hooper, Saxon 9 Daisy Mae Saxon 10 Wind Blows Your Hair (Reprise) Saxon 11 Pushin' Too Hard Saxon


******


The Seeds - Travel with Your Mind (1965 - 67)


Mp3\94Mb


****


Push on picture

******

Rick Andridge: Drums

Daryl Hooper: Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals, Liner Notes, Executive Producer, Compilation Producer

Jan Savage: Guitar

Sky Saxon: Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals


*****
Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine Best known for their rock & roll standard "Pushin' Too Hard," the Seeds combined the raw, Stonesy appeal of garage rock with a fondness for ragged, trashy psychedelia. And though they never quite matched the commercial peak of their first two singles, "Pushin' Too Hard" and "Can't Seem to Make You Mine," the band continued to record for the remainder of the '60s, eventually delving deep into post-Sgt. Pepper's psychedelia and art rock. None of their new musical directions resulted in another hit single, and the group disbanded at the turn of the decade.
Sky Saxon (born Richard Marsh; vocals) and guitarist Jan Savage formed the Seeds with keyboardist Daryl Hooper and drummer Rick Andridge in Los Angles in 1965. By the end of 1966, they had secured a contract with GNP Crescendo, releasing "Pushin' Too Hard" as their first single. The song climbed into the Top 40 early in 1967, and the group immediately released two sound-alike singles, "Mr. Farmer" and "Can't Seem to Make You Mine," in an attempt to replicate their success; the latter came the closest to being a hit, just missing the Top 40. While their singles were garage punk, the Seeds attempted to branch out into improvisational blues-rock and psychedelia on their first two albums, The Seeds (1966) and Web of Sound (1966). With their third album, Future (1967), the band attempted a psychedelic concept album in the vein of Sgt. Pepper's. While the record reached the Top 100 and spawned the minor hit "A Thousand Shadows," it didn't become a hit. Two other albums — Raw & Alive: The Seeds in Concert at Merlin's Music Box (1968) and A Full Spoon of Seedy Blues (1969), which was credited to the Sky Saxon Blues Band — were released at the end of the decade, but both were ignored. The Seeds broke up shortly afterward.
During the early '70s, Saxon led a number of bands before retreating from society and moving to Hawaii. Savage became a member of the Los Angeles Police Department. A collection of rarities and alternate takes, Fallin' off the Edge, was released in 1977.

***
01 - Satisfy You - Savage, Saxon - 2:0402 - The Wind Blows Your Hair - Bigelow, Saxon - 2:3003 - Pretty Girl - Johnson - 2:0304 - Chocolate River - Hooper, Saxon - 3:1005 - Out of the Question - Saxon, Serpent - 2:1606 - March of the Flower Children - Hooper, Saxon - 1:4807 - The Other Place - Saxon - 2:2208 - Fallin off the Edge (Of My Mind) - Cerf, Fowley - 2:5309 - Travel With Your Mind - Hooper, Savage, Saxon - 3:1010 - Flower Lady and Her Assistant - Saxon - 3:2911 - Daisy Mae - Saxon - 1:5512 - Pushin Too Hard [Rehearsal] - Saxon - 2:3713 - 900 Million People Daily All Making Love - Seeds - 10:2014 - A Thousand Shadows [New Mix] - Hooper, Savage, Saxon - 2:3015 - Nobody Spoil My Fun - Saxon - 3:5016 - Wild Blood - Cerf, Fowley - 2:2417 - Now a Man - Hooper, Savage, Saxon - 3:2018 - Sad and Alone - Hooper, Saxon - 2:5019 - Fallin - Hooper, Saxon - 7:4520 - Pushin Too Hard [Original Version] - Saxon - 2:34

******
In garage rock, a little often goes a long way, especially when it comes to the rehearsal tapes, demos, and alternate versions so beloved by trainspotting collectors. Those who memorize matrix numbers and session lists will absolutely adore this 1965-1967 collection of odds and sods by L.A.'s psychedelic-garage heroes the Seeds: 66 minutes' worth of ephemera, ready to be pored over. More casual listeners might find it rather slow going; despite the inclusion of several great songs, like the phenomenally powerful "Satisfy You" and a weirdly stripped-down alternate take of the trippy "March of the Flower Children," there's much here that's only of interest to die-hard fans, like the plodding ten-minute-plus jam "900 Million People Daily" and a chaotic rehearsal take of "Pushin' Too Hard." Complete novices in particular should avoid this album because it presents too skewed a picture of the group; better to start with one of the more traditional compilations and work up to this should you get hooked.

*****

Saturday, February 21, 2009

The Turtles-It Ain't Me Babe (1965)

Mp3\44Mb
*****



Biography
by John Bush
Though many remember only their 1967 hit "Happy Together," the Turtles were one of the more enjoyable American pop groups of the 1960s, moving from folk-rock inspired by the Byrds to a sparkling fusion of Zombies-inspired chamber-pop and straight-ahead good-time pop reminiscent of the Lovin' Spoonful, the whole infused with beautiful vocal harmonies courtesy of dual frontmen Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman. Though they hit number one in 1967 with the infectious "Happy Together," the Turtles scored only three more Top Ten hits and broke up by the end of the '60s. Kaylan and Volman later joined Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention... Read More...
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01. Wanderin' Kind02. It Was A Very Good Year03. Your Maw Said You Cried04. Eve Of Destruction 05. Glitter And Gold06. Let Me Be 07. Let The Cold Winds Blow 08. It Ain't Me Babe 09. A Walk In The Sun 10. Last Laugh 11. Love Minus Zero 12. Like A Rolling Stone 13. We'll Meet Again 14. Gas Money
******
The Turtles' first album presents them as a folk-rock group covering a lot of Dylan and P. F. Sloan material. They also found "It Was a Very Good Year" on a Kingston Trio album and cut it. Frank Sinatra heard their version and had one of his bigger hits with it, but their version is good too.
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