Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Price & Sheridan - This Is To Certify (1970)


This Is To Certify - Rick Price & Mike Sheridan

Both veterans of Birmingham England's early 1960's "Brumbeat" scene, Mike Sheridan and Rick Price began writing songs together in 1968, just a little bit before Price received an offer from Roy Wood of the Move to join that group. He filled the spot left by guitarist/singer Trevor Burton when the latter quit the group, soon after the release of "Blackberry Way". They continued to write together during Price's tenure with the band, which lasted until 1969, at approximately the same time that Jeff Lynne joined the band and Wood conceived the notion of the Electric Light Orchestra -- during that period, the Move recorded one Sheridan/Price copyright, "Lightning Never Strikes", as the B-side of "Brontosaurus". In the wake of his exiting the Move, Price and Sheridan ended up being signed together as recording artists to President Records.

They lasted with the label for a year, releasing singles variously as Rick Price & Sheridan, Sheridan/Price, and several other permutations, although Sheridan/Price was the name ultimately used for their one official album, This Is To Certify That. . .. The tracks were actually credited separately to them within the album, and the exact work of the duo was always a bit confusing, apparently even to the label, which regarded Price as the principal artist. They lasted together officially thru 1970, and their output consisted of beautifully melodic pop-rock, reminiscent of the most pop-oriented output of the Move. In 2004, President Records released a double CD set entitled This Is To Certify That. . ., containing the complete recordings of the duo augmented with Price's solo output for the label. ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide
1. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 01 - Davey has No dad (2:56)

2. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 02 - Lightning Never Strikes (2:40)

3. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 03 - Bitter Sweet (2:45)

4. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 04 - Tracey Smith (2:08)

5. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 05 - Sometimes I Wonder (2:43)

6. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 06 - Tomorrow's Child (2:27)

7. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 07 - Face In My Windows (2:20)

8. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 08 - Will You Leave me behind (2:07)

9. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 09 - Beautiful Sally (2:07)

10. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 10 - On The Moon (2:34)

11. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 11 - Picture Box (2:12)
12. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 12 - Lamp Lighter Man (2:59)

13. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 13 - Follow me, Follow (2:45)

                      14. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 14 - When Love Breaks Your Heart (1:42)

15. Price & Sheridan - 1970 - This Is To Certify - 15 - Top Ten Record (2:13)

 
This is one of the better albums coming from the Move family tree. It was released in 1970 though it has a clear 1967/1968 sound and is one of the best albums of its kind. Rick Price entered the Move sometime in the late 60s, contributing bass and guitar to “Shazam“, “Looking On” and “Message From The Country.” Mike Sheridan had previously been leader of the Nightriders which were a Birmingham group that specialized in the merseybeat sound and 50s rock n roll.

The Nightriders were sort of a breeding ground for future Move members, most importantly Roy Wood. During Price’s tenure with the Move, he and Sheridan started writing songs together for the above album. Both Sheridan and Price share vocals and writing chores on an album that veers into power pop, psychedelia, sunshine pop and progressive pop. There are horn and string arrangements on this beautiful album that recall some of Paul McCartney’s soft moments on the Beatles’ classic White Album (think “Martha My Dear” or even the Move’s great ”Beautiful Daughter”). Some of the heavier moments like “Sometimes I Wonder,” “Lamp Lighter Man,” and “Lightning Never Strikes” sound like excellent 68/69 era Move outtakes. In fact, “Lighting Never Strikes” was released as a Move single at the tail end of the 60s. Sheridan and Price’s version is just as good though not as trippy, with a splendid backwards guitar solo, slashing acoustic guitars and crashing drums. Other songs such as the string laden pop number ”Davey Has No Dad” or the trippy “Picture Box” have a beautiful child-like, story song whimsy that hints at a Ray Davies influence.
This is an exceptional if little known Move album that will appeal to fans of the Beatles, Kinks and even lovers of soft, sunshine pop sounds.
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