Tuesday, March 30, 2010

The Macs - GG Session by & Kaleidoscope Men (Chile)


Los Macs - Ultra Rare South American Beat- Psychedelic 1966-67

Los Mac's fue una de las bandas inaugurales de rock chileno, iniciada en Valparaíso, en 1962 y que dejó como patrimonio un tema clásico de la música psicodélica de la década del sesenta: "La muerte de mi hermano".


El grupo se inició en 1962 en el barrio de Playa Ancha, como grupo de covers de rock que se revelaba y se oía en algunas radios nacionales. Fue el apellido de los hermanos David y Carlos Mac-Iver (sus primeros exponentes) que le proporcionó el nombre al grupo. Durante sus años de adolescencia, en Playa Ancha, los hermanos Mac-Iver se reunían frecuentemente con personajes, en ciernes, de la cultura chilena. como son los casos de los cantautores Gitano Rodríguez, Payo Grondona y el poeta Sergio Badilla Castillo. Después de tocar en los festivales y en las universidades porteñas, se trasladaron a Santiago, donde conocieron al compositor, arreglador y cantante Willy Morales quien compartía las mismas inquietudes musicales quien decide integrarse al grupo y luego incorpora a Eric Franklin. Morales era hijo de arte y venía de la experiencia de un grupo muy popular (Alan y sus Bates). Ahora con canciones propias el grupo Los Mac’s empieza su nueva etapa que marcará la historia del rock nacional. Sus singles iniciales se grabaron en 1965, en virtud de un acuerdo con la casa de discos RCA. Esa misma firma musical respaldó el álbum Go go / 22, su primer larga duración, en 1966, con temas de The Beatles, los Rolling Stones, los Kinks, The Shadows, Bob Dylan y Willy Morales. Los Mac’s recibieron una vigorosa influencia del disco el Sgt. Pepper's lonely hearts club band, de los Beatles, que los llevó a experimentar en el terreno de la psicodelia, previo a la grabación de su álbum Kaleidoscope Men, a fines de 1967. Este es, tal vez, su obra más representativa que quedó como legado para la historia del rock beat chileno. El tema instrumental "El Evangelio de la Gente Sola", (donde destaca el órgano eléctrico de Willy Morales) es sencillamente sobrecogedor y alucinante. En 1968, el grupo, llevado por la mano de Morales, decide partir a Europa , con un concierto de despedida en la Universidad Santa María. Se instalan en Genova, Italia, pero por diferentes razones la banda se disuelve al año siguiente.



David Mac-Iver (Guitarra y Voz)

Carlos Mac-Iver (Bajo y Voz)

Willy Morales (Guitarra, Teclados y Voz)

Eric Franklin (Batería)

Marty Rhone & The Soul Agents - Village Tapestry (Australia)


Marty Rhone will forever be synonymous for his two seventies hits "Denim And Lace" and "Mean Pair Of Jeans" - but to fanatics of Australian music of the sixties - he is fondly remembered for a string of classic songs which seem rather advanced for their vintage.

Marty was born Carl Van Rhoon, on 7th May 1948. A slight, young and shy singer of Dutch-Indonesian descent, he started singing at an early age, and when he was 17 went straight from school to a professional singing career.

In late 1965, Marty and his band, The Blue Feelings, went to the Channel 9 studios to audition for the television show, 'Saturday Date'. However, it actually turned out to be, on the sly, auditioning for a new record company called Spin Records, which was run by Nat Kipner (the father of Steve Kipner of Steve & the Board). Nat liked Marty but not the band, and as a result Marty signed with the label.

The Soul Agents were a respected Sydney band comprising: John Green (guitar) - Barry Kelly (keyboards) - Gerry Dean (bass) and Roger Felice (drums), all musicians of varied background. Nat Kipner had seen The Soul Agents performing at a Sydney club and was very impressed with the band, so in January 1966, Marty Rhone and The Soul Agents joined forces and became part of Nat Kipner's Spin Records roster along with Steve & The Board, the Bee Gees, Jeff St. John & The Id, Tony Barber, The Dave Miller Set and Ronnie Burns.

The next twelve months was a hectic schedule taken up with recording, touring and television appearances. The first single, "Nature Boy", was released on the Spin Label in 1966, followed by "Thirteen Women", "I Want You Back Again", "She Is Mine" and Marty's own composition entitled: "Village Tapestry" - (the Bee Gees did guest backing vocals on both 'She Is Mine' & 'Village Tapestry'). "Village Tapestry" is now considered a minor classic and has since been critically recognised as being way ahead of its time.

There were many highlights in their touring schedule including Marty's support to The Rolling Stones on their 1966 Australian tour and performing at Sydney Stadium on the P.J.Proby Show with Wayne Fontana, Eden Kane and The Bee Gees. This show was also the first appearance of Marty Van Wyk on lead guitar, who had just left The Throb and replaced John Green as lead guitarist with The Soul Agents.

With all the single releases, chart success eluded Marty and the Soul Agents, even with such a compelling original track as "Village Tapestry".

In 1967, The Soul Agents took on a full-time residency performing at one of Sydney's biggest Nightclubs, and Marty moved to Melbourne where he continued to do television and personal appearances and remained there until early 1970 when he was conscripted into the army for a two-year period.

Out of his battle greens in 1972, Marty enrolled at the Conservatorium of Music on a government grant for a two-year period and then turned his attention toward acting, where he worked both live theatre (Godspell) and on television (Number 96 and The Class Of '75).

Then in August 1975, Marty's dues-paying came to an end when he signed to the M7 label and burst into the charts with "Denim And Lace", which became the year's second biggest selling single, and spent thirty-five weeks in the charts.

Within two years Marty had notched up three more hits - "Star Song", "I'm On The Loose Again" and the funky "Mean Pair Of Jeans". Marty went on to represent Australia at the 1976 Australian Popular Song Festival, performing a song composed by Brian Dawe and Steve Groves entitled "I'm On The Loose Again". It became the winning entry and from there they took it to the World Contest at Tokyo, where they took out two major awards - 'Best Song' and 'Most Outstanding Performance'.

By the end of the 70's, Marty was in London performing on stage alongside Yul Brynner in the production of 'The King And I'.

Today, Marty still remains a respected actor/entertainer, whose early work is long overdue proper attention.

Four of their songs; "Every Minute Of You" - "I Can Tell" - "Nature Boy" and "Thirteen Women" were included on Spinning High; "Green Mansions" and "Lonely Too Long" resurfaced on So Good Together; "No No No No" and "Village Tapestry" got a further airing on Spin Discovery; "Leave While The Music Is Still Playing" can also be found on Countdown Silver Jubilee LP, "Mean Pair Of Jeans" also figured on Jukebox From Hell and you'll also find "Ruby With Red Hair" on Sound Of The 70s. "Every Minute Of You" can also be found on the Pretty Ugly CD. Finally, "Thirteen Women", resurfaced on So You Want To Be A Rock And Roll Star, Vol. 1 and So You Want To Be A Rock 'n' Roll Star (3-CD).

The Soul Agents were a well-known Sydney outfit that became Marty Rhone's backing band. They backed other artists but also had a release of their own. The band's sound was tailored by guitarist John Green, who'd formerly been in The Lost Souls and both he and Barry Kelly went on to Jeff St. John and Copperwine. A respected bunch of musicians, Dutch-born guitarist Marty Van Wyk - writer of the Somebody's Image hit "Hide & Seek" - was an original member of The Throb and later The Cherokees. Roger Felice went on to form Rockwell T. James and The Rhythm Aces with Ronnie Peel, and later moved to England and joined Thunderclap Newman. It was the flip side on their 45, "I'm Still Mad At You", that's the gem. A pounding mod-punker with just a tinge of acid, you can also check it out on Diggin' For Gold, Vol. 3.
                                                                     Roger Felice

1. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - 01 Nature Boy (2:34)

2. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - Thirteen Women (2:54)

3. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - Village Tapestry (2:34)

4. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - I Want You Back Again (2:02)

5. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - She Is Mine (2:46)

6. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - No, No, No ,No (2:45)

7. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - What More Can I Do (1:28)

8. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - I Can Tell (1:58)

9. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - Every Minute Of You (2:12)

10. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - Tell Me Love (2:09)

11. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - Lonely Too Long (2:36)

12. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - Green Mansions (2:27)

13. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - She's Coming Home (2:29)

14. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - Hurry Poor Working Man (2:19)

15. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - As The Sun Goes Down (3:42)

16. Marty Rhone & the Soul Agents - So You Want To Be A Pop Singer (3:34)

The Viscounts - The Pye Anthology

REPOST



The Viscounts were one of those odd pop/rock & roll hybrid groups that were common to both America and England at the end of the 1950s and the start of the '60s, but which always seemed to do better in England. The trio coalesced out of an eight-piece outfit called Morton Fraser's Harmonica Gang, based in London -- they were a variety act that were popular on television, and did a few world tours during the second half of the '50s. Manchester-born Don Paul, who had won a few important talent competitions, including Opportunity Knocks on British television, joined the octet in 1956, and he soon met another newcomer, Ronnie Wells, winner of a recent harmonica competition, from Farnborough, Hampshire. And in 1958, Indian-born Gordon Mills, son of a Welsh army non-com, and another champion harmonica virtuoso, came aboard in 1958. The three soon discovered that, in contrast to Morton Fraser, who considered rock & roll to be little more than a passing fad (and an intermittently annoying one) at best, they liked the new music. They quit the group after a show in Dublin, and took the name the Viscounts after the model of plane that they took back to England.

They spent 1959 learning the ropes at small workingmen's clubs, and somehow were able to interest Larry Parnes, then one of the two or three top rock & roll talent managers in England. Virtually overnight, they were featured on bills alongside Marty Wilde, Billy Fury and other top acts managed by Parnes, and a recording contract with Pye Records followed in 1960. They made their debut with a cover of Ray Smith's hit "Rockin' Little Angel" b/w "That's All Right," in a recording session that included top British rockabilly guitarist Joe Brown. That single never charted in England but was hugely successful in Australia, and the mere fact that they were under contract to Pye got them better bookings. Their rendition of "Shortnin' Bread," in the manner of recent American hit singles by Paul Chaplain and the Bell Notes, followed in the summer of 1960, and it reached number 16 on the British pop charts. The group's sound at this point was a strange amalgam of rock & roll and music hall pop, the production usually included some electric instruments but generally played and presented in a way that wasn't threatening to listeners over 25. They were asked on occasion to reach back to earlier eras in style, which resulted in their cover of Paul Whiteman's "That's My Weakness Now" -- and that record, in turn, brought about the trio's foray into trad jazz as part of a multi-artist compilation album entitled Razzmatazz & All That Jazz, featuring their unlikely renditions of "Ain't She Sweet," and "Yes Sir, That's My Baby," among others. For a supposed rock & roll act, they were saddled with improbable source material, such as "Money (Is the Root of All Evil)," a number associated with the Four Preps; meanwhile, Liverpool acts of the same era were wearing out copies of Barrett Strong's Motown release "Money (That's What I Want)." The Viscounts did tour with the likes of Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran, and covered "Who Put the Bomp (In the Bomp Bomp Bomp)," but there were changes going on in the music around them with which they could not keep up -- groups that were self-contained instrumentally, and even a few that wrote their own songs, were coming up around them, generating a much more powerful sound. They got to see the best of them, the Beatles, up close, when they were booked on a tour in early 1963 in support of Chris Montez that included the Liverpool quartet, just as "Please Please Me" had broken. The Viscounts actually had some songwriting ability -- they'd written a few of their own B-sides -- but soon there emerged from their ranks a major talent in that area in Gordon Mills, with a hit composition of his own entitled "I'll Never Get Over You." Even this attribute further destabilized the trio, as Mills began to see that there was far more money to be made -- with far less work than the six nights a week they appeared in cabaret and personal appearances, or tours across the hinterlands -- from the back-office end of the music business. As Don Paul recalled in his notes to the 2001-vintage Castle anthology of the group's work, once Johnny Kidd & the Pirates took one of Mills' songs to the Top Three, the group's days were numbered. They tried to compete with the harder British beat sounds going on around them when they jumped to EMI's Columbia imprint in 1964, but a trio of their releases failed to chart. They broke up in early 1965 and Mills followed this exit in short order by composing "It's Not Unusual" and becoming the manager of both Tom Jones and, later, a former fellow Larry Parnes' act, Gerry Dorsey, who, by then, was billing himself as Engelbert Humperdinck. Don Paul went on to produce Carl Wayne and Julie Covington, among other vocalists, while Ronnie Wells left music to become a successful restauranteur. In 2001, Castle Records released Who Put the Bomp -- The Pye Anthology, a 31-song collection of their complete Pye Records sides from 1960 through 1963.
****
The Viscounts - The Pye Anthology


Not the American outfit of that name, but the British trio of Gordon Mills, Don Paul, and Ronnie Wells are featured here, on 31 of their early-'60s recordings for Pye Records. The sound is a uniquely British/European adaptation of rock & roll, melding pop and traditional tunes with guitars and drums and a beat — picture a branch of teen pop spun out of the same sensibilities that yielded "Ain't She Sweet" and "My Bonnie" by the Beatles and Tony Sheridan from their Hamburg sessions. The Four Preps' "Money (Is the Root of All Evil)," which is covered here from 1961, is a long way from the Motown-generated "Money (That's What I Want)" as a notion or a song, but it represents what the Viscounts and their management aimed for as an audience — and as a warning, a lot of Americans (and Britishers too young to know) may really hate this sort of hybrid of rock & roll and the music hall represented here. The three singers seemed willing to do whatever would sell, and some of what's here did do that — "Shortnin' Bread" peaked at number 16 in England — but there were some decent rock & rollers present on many of these records, including British rockabilly guitarist Joe Brown (who played on their debut Pye single, "Rockin' Little Angel" b/w "That's All Right"), and the group did tour with Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent. They did do a decent cover of "Who Put the Bomp (In the Bomp Bomp Bomp)," but it's juxtaposed with "Honey Come On, Dance With Me," a decided pop-style number that was theme to the Spin-A-Long TV show, hosted by DJ Alan Freeman, whose notions of pop-based rock & roll were perfectly represented by the Viscounts. These guys were hip enough to share a program with the Beatles early in the latter's national stardom, but not to survive what the Beatles and the acts they pulled onto the national U.K. charts did to rock & roll and pop music. Actually, the group's material here from 1962 onward is not bad, and is of a piece with the work of Helen Shapiro and other pre-Beatles pop/rockers, but be warned — the last half-dozen songs here were derived from their contribution to a trad jazz compilation album, and feature the Viscounts shoehorned into a 1920s repertoire that will only be appreciated by listeners familiar with that British offshoot of Dixieland jazz.


1. Shortnin' Bread 2. Fee-Fi-Fo-Fum 3. That's Alright 4. Rockin' Little Angel 5. Money (Is The Root Of All Evil) 6. One-Armed Bandit 7. Banned In Boston 8. Moonlight Promises 9. Joe Sweeney 10. Honey Come On, Dance With Me 11. Who Put The Bomp (In The Bomp, Bomp, Bomp) 12. What Am I Saying 13. Mama's Doin' The Twist 14. I'm Going - But I'll Be Back 15. One Of The Guys 16. Dear Mary Brown 17. Everybody's Got A Ya-Ya 18. A Lot Of Livin' To Do 19. That Stranger (Used To Be My Girl) 20. Silent Night 21. Don't Let Me Cross Over 22. I'm Coming Home 23. It's You 24. I'll Never Get Over You 25. Five Foot Two, Eyes Of Blue 26. Yes Sir, That's My Baby 27. Well I Ask You 28. I Wanna Be Loved By You 29. That's My Weakness Now 30. Ain't She Sweet 31. You'Ve Got To See Mama Every Night

The Rapiers- -Return of the Rapiers (1991)




Brilliant 'Shadows' styled Rock'n'roll from The Rapiers ...

The Return Of The Rapiers (Fury, 1991)
The current line up of the Rapiers is Colin Pryce-Jones, lead guitarist, vocalist and founder member of the group, Dave Lawes, rhythm guitarist and vocalist who has been with Colin from the outset, Brad Dallaston, bass guitarist and John Tuck, drummer. As for their music The Rapiers champion Beat, Rock and Instrumentals from the pre-Merseybeat era, when those particular genres had reached their collective zenith. As Colin says, "Over the years we've tried to put together an act which is based on memories of the Fentones, the Shadows and early sixties bands like the Gladiators and Johnny Kidd and the Pirates, rather than stylising purely on the Shadows. The band really relates to a period between '59 and '63." The Rapiers also specialise in other respects. They perform numbers which have long since lapsed into obscurity. They don't merely concentrate on big hits. There were many fine recordings issued during 1959-1963 which were either minor hits or chart failures. In this respect, The Rapiers are unearthing a veritable treasure trove of long lost classics and re-presenting them to a new audience.

Rob Bradford, 1991



Formed in the early eighties in the north of London, The Rapiers gained much influence and credibility for a sound that resemble a classic Merseybeat rock and roll sound like Cliff Richard and his backing group The Shadows. Led by singer Colin Pryce-Jones, the group performed in numerous venues in London and England before recording its 1983 debut EP effort, Vol. I, on Red Door Records.

Three more EPs followed from 1984 to 1986, with its first vinyl full-length being Straight To The Point in 1985 on Ace Records. Known for being a great live act, magazines such as The Face and New Musical Express reported on the group. In 1987, The Rapiers released its second album 1961 on Ace Records. Throughout this time though, the group became a supporting group for several British musicians, including Cliff Richard, Billy J. Kramer and Freddie Garrity. In 1991, the quartet released The Return Of The Rapiers on Fury Records. In 1994, Back To The Point was released to much praise. Guitarist Neil Ansby and bass player Brad Dallaston left The Rapiers, replaced by guitarist Wayne Nicholls and bass player Nathan John Hulse. The band released You'll Never Walk Alone With in 2000 and more touring ensured, including supporting Mike Berry. A greatest hits compilation was released in 2002. Spotlight On The Rapiers was released on Fury Records. The group plans to star as The Shadows in a touring British production titled "Cliff The Musical". In 2003, they released Return of ... and Back to the Point, followed by 1961 in December of 2005.

1. The Rapiers - Return Of The Rapiers (2:34)

2. The Rapiers - Move It Baby (2:30)

3. The Rapiers - Jack's Good (2:26)

4. The Rapiers - A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues (2:47)

5. The Rapiers - Breakfast At The Ace (3:59)

6. The Rapiers - The Feminine Look (2:00)

7. The Rapiers - Cuban Heel (4:21)

8. The Rapiers - Is It Her? (3:47)

9. The Rapiers - Jazz At Jones' (3:27)

10. The Rapiers - Choppin' And Changin' (2:21)

11. The Rapiers - Shadowland (3:27)

12. The Rapiers - Doing The Hully Gully (2:01)

13. The Rapiers - Early Morning Twist (2:34)

14. The Rapiers - (I Feel Like) I'm Losing You (2:49)

15. The Rapiers - Lynch Mob (2:57)

The Four Preps & The Lettermen - Back to Back Hits




THE FOUR PREPS  - "CAPITOL COLLECTOR'S SERIES" 
WILL BE SOON !
***
1. 26 Miles (Santa Catalina) - The Four Preps

2. Big Man - The Four Preps

3. Down by the Station (Early in the Morning) - The Four Preps

4. Lazy Summer Night - The Four Preps

5. Got a Girl - The Four Preps

6. Goin' Out of My Head/Can't Take My Eyes off of You - The Lettermen

7. Hurt So Bad - The Lettermen

8. Way You Look Tonight - The Lettermen

9. When I Fall in Love - The Lettermen

10. Come Back, Silly Girl - The Lettermen
 
Thaks for  http://catateblog.blogspot.com

V.A. - 60's At The BEEB ... vol. 5-8.



60’s At The BEEB Disc 5


01. [introduction]

02. A.Peebles The Who - Happy Jack (rec. 1/67)

03. int. w/ Pete Townshend

04. The Who - Boris The Spider

05. The Who - See My Way

06. A.Peebles

07. int. w/ Eric Clapton

08. Cream - I Feel Free (rec. 1/10/67)

09. Cream - N.S.U.

10. Cream - Four Until Late

11. A.Peebles

12. The Spencer Davis Group - Gimmie Some Lovin'

13. The Spencer Davis Group - I'm A Man

14. A.Peebles

15. The Animals - When I Was Young (rec. 1/67)

16. int. w/ Eric Burdon

17. Donavan - Mellow Yellow

18. The Move - I Can Hear the Grass Grow

19. A.Peebles

20. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Purple Haze (rec. 2/13/67)

21. int. w/ Jimi Hendrix

22. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Hey Joe segment five

23. A.Peebles

24. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Foxy Lady

25. int. w/ Eric Burdon (on Hendrix)

26. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Love or Confussion

27. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Killing Floor (rec. 3/28/67)

28. A.Peebles

29. The Jeff Beck Group - Hi Ho Silver Lining (rec. 3/67)

30. A.Peebles

31. The Yardbirds - Little Games

32. int. w/ Chris Dreja, Paul Samuel Smith and Jim McCarty

33. The Yardbirds-Most Likely You'll Go Your Way & I'll Go Mine

34. A.Peebles int. w/ The Bee Gees

35. The Bee Gees - New York Mining Disaster, 1941



60’s At The BEEB Disc 6

01. A.Peebles

02. Cream - Strange Brew

03. Cream - Tales Of Brave Ulyssess

04. The Turtles - She'd Rather Be With Me

05. The Turtles - So Happy Together

06. Procol Harum - A Whiter Shade of Pale (rec. 6/67)

07. A.Peebles / int. w/ Jeff Beck

08. The Jeff Beck Group - Telly Man

09. The Jeff Beck Group - Rock My Flim Soul

10. A.Peebles

11. The Animals - San Franciscan Nights (rec. 8/15/67)

12. A.Peebles The Moody Blues-Nights in White Satin (rec.9/20/67)

13. Traffic - Hle In My Shoe (rec. 9/67)

14. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Catfish Blues (rec. 10/6/67)

15. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Drivin' South (rec. 10/6/67)

16. int. w/ Jimi, Mitch and Noel

17. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Burning Of The Midnight Lamp

18. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Hound Dog segment five

19. The Who - I Can See For Miles (rec. 10/10/67)

20. The Who - Summertime Blues

21. The Troggs - Love is All Around

22. int. w/ Reg Presley

23. A.Peebles Cream - Outside Woman Blues

24. int. w/ Eric Clapton

25. Cream - Born Under A Bad Sign (rec. 10/24/67)

26. The Kinks - Autumn Almanac



60’s At Ther BEEB Disc 7

01. A.Peebles

02. The Jimi Hendrix Experience-Day Tripper (rec. 12/15/67)

03. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Wait Until Tomorrow

04. Eric Burdon - Monterey

05. A.Peebles

06. Cream - Steppin Out (rec. 1/9/68)

07. Cream - Politician

08. A.Peebles

09. The Troggs - Peggy Sue

10. The Troggs - Little Green Apples

11. A.Peebles / int. w/ Chris Dreja

12. The Yardbirds - Think About It (rec. 3/68)

13. int. w/ Jimmy Page

14. The Yardbirds - Goodnight Sweet Josephine

15. A.Peebles / int. w/ Arthur Brown

16. The Crazy World of Arthur Brown - Fire

17. A.Peebles

18. Pink Floyd - Julia Dream (rec. 6/25/68)

19. Pink Floyd - Let There Be More Light

20. Pink Floyd - Murderistic Women

21. A.Peebles

22. Joe Cocker-With A Little Help Fom My Friends (rec 10/7/68)

23. Fleetwood Mac –

24. Jethro Tull - Love Story (rec. 11/68)

25. A.Peebles

26. Pink Floyd - Point Me At the Sky (rec.12/68)

27. Pink Floyd - Embryo

28. Ten Years After - I'm Going Home



60’s At The BEEB Disc 8

01. A.Peebles

02. Deep Purple - Emmeretta

03. Led Zeppelin - Communication Breakdown

04. Led Zeppelin - You Shook Me (rec. 3/3/69)

05. A.Peebles

06. Free -

07. The Nice - Diary of an Empty Day

08. King Crimson-In the Court of the Crimson King (rec. 5/6/69)

09. A.Peebles

10. Led Zeppelin - Whole Lotta Love (rec. 6/69)

11. int. w/ Jimmy Page

12. Led Zeppelin - What is and What Should Never Be

13. Led Zeppelin - Travelling Riverside Blues

14. A.Peebles

15. Elton John - Lady Samantha (rec. 7/69)

16. int. w/ Elton John

17. Elton John - Sails

18. Yes - Looking Around (rec. 8/4/69)

19. A.Peebles

20. Deep Purple - Speed King (rec. 10/31/69)

21. David Bowie-Un-washed and Slightly Dazed (rec. 10/20/69)

22. int. w/ David Bowie

23. David Bowie - Let Me Sleep Beside You

24. The Beatles - Rock and Roll Music (rec. 11/25/64)

Sunday, March 28, 2010

V.A. - 60's At The BEEB ... vol. 1- 4.

"...Back around 1987, Westwood One produced a show for radio broadcast called "The 60's at the Beeb". It contained a bunch of rare recordings and Interviews made for BBC radio from 1964 through 1969.
The quality is actually quite good, and there is too much great stuff on this 8 disc collection to let it pass you by! ..."


60’s At The BEEB
Disc 1

01. Introduction

02. Andy Peebles>

03. The Beatles - Long Tall Sally (recorded for Top Gear)

04. The Beatles - Things We Said Today “

05. int. w/ the Beatles "

06. The Beatles - A Hard Day's Night "

07. The Kinks - You Really Got Me

08. The Kinks - All the Day and All the Night

09. Andy Peebles

10. The Rolling Stones - Route 66 (recorded 3/19/64)

11. The Rolling Stones - Mona (I Need You Baby) "

12. The Beatles - I'm A Loser

13. int. w/ the Beatles

14. The Beatles - Everybody's Tryin to Be My Baby

15. int. w/ the Beatles

16. The Beatles - She's A Woman

17. The Beatles - I Feel Fine

18. int. w/ the Beatles

19. The Beatles - Rock and Roll Music

20. int. w/ the Beatles

21. The Beatles - Kansas City

22. The Beatles - I'll Follow the Sun

23. Jerry and the Pacemakers -

24. The Searchers - Love Potion #9

25. Herman's Hermits -

26. Andy Peebles

27. The Animals - Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood

28. The Animals - Gonna Send You Back to Walker

29. Andy Peebles / int. w/ The Yardbirds

30. The Yardbirds - For Your Love

31. Andy Peebles / Brian Matthews interviews The Rolling Stones

32. The Rolling Stones - The Last Time

33. The Rolling Stones - Down the Road Apiece

34. Them - Here Comes the Night

35. Them - All For Myself



60’s At The BEED
Disc 2

01. The Animals - Bring it on Home to Me (rec. 4/65)

02. int. w/ Eric Burdon

03. The Animals - C. C. Rider (rec. 4/65)

04. A. Peebles

05. The Moody Blues - Go Now (rec. 4/65)

06. Donavan - Catch the Wind

07. A.Peebles>The Kinks-Tired of Waiting for You

08. A.Peebles

09. The Who - Just You and Me (rec. 5/24/65)

10. int. w? Pete Townsend

11. The Who - Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere

12. A.Peebles

13. Brian Matthew

14. The Beatles - Dizzy Miss Lizzy

15. int. w/ The Beatles

16. The Beatles - Everybody's Tryin to Be My Baby

17. The Beatles - Ticket to Ride

18. A.Peebles

19. The Yardbirds - Heart Full of Soul (rec. 6/65)

20. The Yardbirds - I Wish You Would

21. The Yardbirds - I've Been Wrong

22. Them - Gloria

23. Them - One More Time

24. A.Peebles The Animals - We Gotta Get Out of This Place

25. int. w/ Eric Burdon

26. The Animals - Heartbreak Hotel

27. int. w/ Eric Burdon

28. The Animals - Work Song (rec. 7/65)

29. The Kinks - See My Friends

30. int. w/ Chris Dreja, Paul Samuel Smith and Jim McCarty

31. The Kinks - This Strange Effect

32. The Yardbirds - I'm A Man

33. int. w/ Chris Dreja, Paul Samuel Smith and Jim McCarty

34. The Yardbirds - Too Much Monkey Business



60’s At The BEEB
Disc 3

01. The Rolling Stones-(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction

02. int. w/ Mick Jagger

03. The Rolling Stones - Cry To Me

04. The Rolling Stones - Mercy, Mercy

05. The Rolling Stones - Fannie Mae

06. The Rolling Stones - Oh Baby, We've Really Got A Good Thing Going

07. The Yardbirds - Evil Hearted You

08. int. w/ Jim McCarty

09. The Yardbirds - Still I'm Sad

10. The Yardbirds - Hang On Sloopy

11. A.Peebles

12. The Small Faces - What Ya' Gonna Do About It?

13. The Steam Packet (w/ Rod Stewart) - It's All Right

14. A.Peebles/The Animals - It's My Life

15. The Animals - Carina Carina

16. The Hollies - Look Through Any Window

17. The Yardbirds - You're A Better Man Than I

18. The Yardbirds - Train Kept A' Rollin

19. A.Peebles

20. int. w/ Pete Townsend

21. The Who - My Generation (rec. 11/22/65)

22. A.Peebles

23. The Kinks - A Well Respected Man (rec. 12/13/65)

24. The Kinks - 'Till The End Of the Day

25. The Kinks - Where Have All the Good Times Gone?

26. A.Peebles

27. The Animals - Inside Looking Out

28. The Animals - Sweet Little Sixteen

29. The Who - Substitute (rec. 3/66)

30. int. w/ Pete Townsend

31. The Who - A Man With Money

32. The Who - Dancing in the Streets



60’s At The BEEB
 Disc 4

01. A.Peebles

02. The Mindbenders - Groovy Kind Of Love (rec. 3/66)

03. Manfred Mann - Pretty Flamingo

04. The Troggs - From Home

05. int. w/ Reg Presley

06. The Troggs - Wild Thing

07. int. w/ Reg Presley

08. The Troggs - With A Girl Like You

09. int. w/ Reg Presley

10. The Troggs - Lost Girl

11. int. w/ Reg Presley

12. The Troggs - The Yellow In Me

13. The Jimi Hendrix Experience -

14. The Yardbirds - Shapes of Things (rec. 2/66)

15. int. w/Chris Dreja, Paul Samuel Smith & Jim McCarty

16. The Yardbirds - The Sun is Shining

17. The Yardbirds - Over Under Sideways Down

18. A.Peebles

19. The Who - Disquises (rec. 9/13/66)

20. int. w/ Pete Townshend

21. The Who - I'm A Boy

22. The Who - So Sad

23. A.Peebles

24. int. w/ Reg Presley

25. The Troggs-I Can't Control Myself (rec. 9/27/66)

26. A.Peebles

27. The Animals - Jailhouse Rock

28. int. w/ Eric Burdon

29. The Animals - Paint It Black

30. A.Peebles

31. Cream - Sweet Wine

32. int. w/ Eric Clapton

33. Cream - Wrapping Paper

34. A.Peebles

35. Cream - Lawdy Mama

36. Cream - Train Time

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Kaleidoscope - Pulsating Dream The Epic Recordings (1967-1970) 3 CD


Kaleidoscope were arguably the most eclectic band of the psychedelic era, weaving together folk, blues, Middle Eastern, and acid more often and seamlessly than any other musicians. The California group were formed under the nucleus of multi-instrumentalists David Lindley and Chris Darrow in the mid-'60s. Adding fiddle, banjo, and various exotic string instruments such as the oud and saz to the traditional rock lineup, Kaleidoscope complemented their experimental sounds with taut and witty (if lyrically eccentric) songwriting. Other important members were Solomon Feldthouse, who specialized in the Turkish-style instruments, and Chester Crill, who, to make documentation just that much more difficult, sometimes used odd pseudonyms like Fenrus Epp.



Saul (Solomon) Feldthouse - caz, oud, doumbeg, gong, bass, vocals

David Lindley - banjo, fiddle, guitar, harpguitar, vocals

Max Buda (Chester Crill) - organ, harmonium, fiddle, bass, piano, harmonica, harpsichord

Chris Darrow - bass, guitar, mandolin, vocals

John Vidican - percussion, drums, timpaniWith the exception of their mawkish forays into old-timey music, Kaleidoscope's work holds up well. Their first three albums were their best, highlighted by the lengthy tracks "Taxim" and "Seven-Ate Sweet," which are groundbreaking fusions of Middle Eastern music and rock. Kaleidoscope were a popular live act, even incorporating some flamenco and belly dancers into their performances. But in commercial terms their very eclecticism probably worked against them. Hit singles, too, were a difficult proposition for such a versatile group to get to grips with, although several of their 45s were pretty good. One of the best, "Nobody," was a most unusual fusion of R&B and psychedelia that found the group backing veteran rock and blues greats Larry Williams and Johnny "Guitar" Watson.

Kaleidoscope's eclecticism may have been a by-product of numerous personnel changes throughout the last half of the '60s that would make the construction of a family tree a most unwieldy task. Darrow, in fact, only lasted a couple of albums; in 1970, shortly after their fourth album, they split up. Several of the group's more important contributors reunited for an album in 1975 (although Lindley played only a small part); there was another reunion record in 1988.

CD 1

01.Egyptian Gardens 3.05

02. If The Night 1.45

03. Hesitation Blues 2.25

04. Please 3.16

05. Keep Your Mind Open 2.15

06. Pulsating Dream 1.54

07. Oh Death 3.25

08. Come On In 2.07

09. Why Try 3.43

10. Minnie The Moocher 2.13

11. Elevator Man 2.54

12. Little Orphan Nannie 1.54

13. I Found Out 2.09

14. Greenwood Sidee 4.12

15. Life Will Pass You By 3.22

16. Taxim 11.20

17. Baldheaded End Of A Broom 3.12

18. Louisiana Man 2.42

19. You Don't Love Me 3.57

CD 2

01. Beacon From Mars 12.29

02. Rampe, Rampe 3.31

03. Nobody 2.35

04. Love Games 2.28

05. Egyptian Candy 3.01

06. Hello, Trouble 2.04

07. Just A taste 2.13

08. Lie To Me 2.45

09. Let The Good Love Flow 2.10

10. Killing Floor 2.44

11. Petite Fleur 3.29

12. Banjo 3.34

13. Cuckoo 4.15

14. Seven-Ate Sweet 11.31

CD 3

01. Sefan 4.25

02. Chocolate Whale 2.27

03. Another lover 2.42

04. Sneakin' through The Ghetto 3.17

05. To Know Is Not To Be 2.13

06. Lulu Arfin Nanny 3.09

07. Lie And Hide 2.52

08. Ballad Of Tommy Udo 2.49

09. Bernice 2.41

10. Soft And Easy 2.55

11. New Blue Ooze 9.39

12. Why Try 2.46
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...