Sunday, May 30, 2010

The Dennisons - From Music Of Year 1964 (Live and Singles Privat Compiling )



One of England's earliest Merseyside bands, the Dennisons failed to break through to an international audience. Although they released an impressive debut single featuring their original tune, "Be My Girl" b/w a song, "You Don't Know What Love Is," written for them by Ben E. King, their decision to turn down a chance to record John Lennon and Paul McCartney's "All My Loving" turned out to be their downfall. With the departure of vocalist Eddie Parry, following the release of their final single, "Nobody Like Me Baby," in November 1964, the group struggled until disbanding in 1966.





Line up:
Eddie Parry - Vocals
Steve McLaren - Lead Guitar
Ray Scragge - Rhythm Guitar
Alan Willis - Bass Guitar
Clive Hornby - Drums

Inspired by Liverpool-based band the Ravens, later known as Faron's Flamingos, the Dennisons spent much of their early days in the band's shadow. Attending the group's rehearsals, they diligently copied the chords of their songs.

Acquiring a solid following with their Saturday night performances at the BICC Club in Melling, the Dennisons signed a management contract with Kennedy Street Enterprises in early 1963. The association reaped almost immediate dividends as the band was frequently booked into the Cavern Club, where they often shared bills with the Beatles.
During the quarter of a century since their disbanding, the Dennisons have periodically reunited. They performed a special memorial concert following the death of bass guitarist Terry "Tex" Carson in 1991. Six years later, the remaining three bandmembers -- Steve McLaren, Ray Scragg, and Clive Hornby -- performed on Hornby's solo album, This Is Your Life. Although a reorganized version of the band, featuring original member Scragg, began performing in 2000, the death of Scragg in February 2001 ended the project. ~ Craig Harris, All Music Guide

1. The Dennisons - Nobody Like My Babe (1:41)

2. The Dennisons - Be My Girl (2:37)

3. The Dennisons - Devoted To You (live) (2:13)

4. The Dennisons - Little Latin Lupe Lu (1:56)

5. The Dennisons - Lucy (You Sure Did It This Time) (2:13)

6. The Dennisons - Walking The Dog (2:31)

7. The Dennisons - You Better Move On (Live) (2:57)

8. The Dennisons - You Don't Know What Love Is (1:57)
 
The Dennisons where another very popular group who many thought would make it to the top, they made such an impact at The Cavern, DJ Bob Wooler said “they’ve created the biggest impression on Merseyside since The Beatles”. Record companies heard they were drawing crowds in Liverpool like the Beatles used to do and Decca rushed up to sign them, releasing their debut record ’Come On Be My Girl’ in July 1963, a number they had written themselves. This was followed up with their version of the Rufus Thomas song ‘Walkin’ The Dog’, the ‘B’ side, ‘You Don’t Know What Love Is’ was written for them by Ben E King while they were touring with him, the record reached No. 36 in the charts. Their final single, ’Nobody Like My Babe’ , was released in November 1964 and although it was very commercial, it didn’t enter the charts.
The group disbanded in 1966.

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas - Little Children & I'll Keep You Satisfied (1964)


This Collectables reissue features two albums released in 1964 on the Imperial label by British invasion band Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas. Although their reign on the pop charts would be extremely short, they managed to score a few memorable hits. The albums Little Children (also the title of their first hit single in the U.S.) and I'll Keep You Satisfied include several Lennon/McCartney-penned songs: "Bad to Me" (another hit), "Do You Want to Know a Secret," and "I Call Your Name," along with cover versions of "Da Doo Ron Ron," "Great Balls of Fire," and "The Twelfth of Never." While this is a fine reissue, The Best of Billy J. Kramer on EMI would probably be a better purchase for anyone but the most ardent Merseybeat fan.




Little Children

01. Little Children

02. Da Doo Ron Ron

03. Dance with Me

04. Pride

05. I Know

06. They Remind Me of You

07. Do You Want to Know a Secret

08. Bad to Me

09. Great Balls of Fire

10. It's Up to You

11. Tell Me Girl



I'll Keep You Satisfied

12. I'll Keep You Satisfied

13. I Call Your Name

14. Beautiful Dreamer

15. The Twelfth of Never

16. Sugar Babe

17. I'll Be On My Way

18. From a Window

19. Second to None

20. Anything That's Part of You

21. Still Waters

22. Yes

23. The Cruel Surf

Friday, May 28, 2010

Heimatliche Klaenge - Privately Tapes

From  Jancy
This really rarest original stuff



Heimatliche Klänge - Jancy's privately tapes

01 - Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Da

02 - Sweet For My Sweet

03 - Come On And Sing

04 - Boys

05 - Play With Fire

06 - Dizzy Miss Lizzy

07 - Poor Boy

08 - Satisfaction

09 - Paint It Black

10 - Johnny Guitar

11 - Louie Louie

12 - Come On

13 - Poor Boy

14 - Why

15 - As Tears Go By

16 - Long Long While
 
 

Thursday, May 27, 2010

John Smith & The New Sound - Snoopy vs The Red Baron


FROM JANCY

John Smith – Biography

John thinks he’s a clown”, said my final school report!....it was the only time the school got anything right ( for me anyway ).


I started playing the Ukulele in 1955 during my lunch-hour at my first job. I learnt 3 chords, D, G, & A7. Then I heard Josh White, Big Bill Broonzy, & Lonnie Donegan and formed my first skiffle group called “Jubilee”. For our first job, we earned £5.00 between four of us for a 4 hour gig (not bad money for 1955 considering we were only worth 5 shillings). By 1958 we were doing 6-8 gigs a week and learning all the time.

After being offered a solo recording contract in 1964, I recorded “More & More” with a new name…..”Bobby Dean”. It got quite a lot of airplay but never did well.

The name had to go, Bill Wellings, my manager, was a great friend and fan of mine, as I was of him. He introduced me to EMI & the “Top Six” label in 1964. Bill got together some of the best musicians around and we copied the original hits of the day. We were known as “The Ghost Squad”. Our slogan was:


“Six Hits for 6s & 8p”

I had the best couple of years recording about 75 hits of the time and, boy oh boy, did I learn a lot, but how could you miss with the following line-up, all directed by the great Johnny Harris and produced by Bill Wellings at the Pye Studios in London.


MUSICIANS MD : Johnny Harris (also piano, trumpet & backing vocals) Piano / keyboards: Johnny Harris & Laurie Holloway Guitar: Big Jim Sullivan, Bass: Vic Pitt, Lennie Bush Drums: Kenny Clare, Bobby Kevin, Jimmy Nicol ( the Beatles deputy drummer) Organ: Roger Coulan (also percussion) Various Brass & Strings


BACKING VOCALS The Mike Sammes Singers I will be eternally grateful to these very talented performers who were always a joy to work with. During this time I was still recording under my own name

“John Smith & The New Sound” and “John Smith & Co.”

I was very lucky to have my recording of “Winchester Cathedral” make number 2 in Germany and “Snoopy Vs The Red Baron” get to number 8 with a self-penned song “Send her Home” on the ‘B’ side. I worked a lot in Germany (see the video clip of “Beat Club” above) & had a few other successful recordings there such as “Make it Me”, “Don’t Break it Up” and a couple of 12” albums did quite well.

At the ripe old age of 28, I was offered a Job working on a cruise ship (guitar/vocals/comic). I was supposed to stay on the ships for about 4 months, but retired from the sea in 1993. ( See my book “A Laugh on The Ocean Wave”)

During my time ashore, I worked with some of the greats:

Guy Mitchell, Frankie Laine, Al Martino Eddie Fisher Bobby Rydell Del Shannon The Village People Chubby Checker John Rowles Tom T.Hall Blood Sweat & Tears Harry Secombe Dick Emery the wonderful Vera Lynn, and many more

I now reside in Devon with my two favourite ladies Pat & Lily…. (by the way, Lily is a Golden Retriever)
01 - High Time

02 - Send Her Home

03 - Got To Get You Into My Life

04 - No-one Knows

05 - Wrapping Paper

06 - Stop Stop Stop

07 - Snoopy VS. The Red Baron

08 - I'm On The Up

09 - Big Time Operator

10 - Here's A Heart

11 - When I Come Home

12 - All Or Nothing

13 - Wait For Me Baby

14 - Winchester Cathedral



from lp va "original beat aus england" vol. 20

15 - See Emily Play

16 - You Keep Me Hangin' On

John Smith & The New Sound - Singles


FROM  JANCY


Lp va. R & R (italy)

01 - Guitar Booge

02 - That's Right

03 - Walk Time Track



Sgs

04 - Matthew And Son

05 - Night Of Fear

06 - Make It Me

07 - Don't Break It Up

08 - Out And About

09 - Don't Back The Loser

10 - Girls In Love

11 - Birthday

12 - Just A Loser

13 - Return Of Django

14 - Gin Gan Goolie

The Swinging Blue Jeans - 1964 Live Aus Dem Cascade Beat-Club (Remastered 1994)


Live aus dem Cascade Beat Club in Köln is one of the rarest albums by a hit British Invasion band released near the peak of its popularity. Its existence is unknown even to most Swinging Blue Jeans fans, and the material doesn't even appear on the otherwise thorough four-CD set of their 1960s recordings, Good Golly, Miss Molly! The EMI Years 1963-1969. Does that mean it's worth the hunt? Quite possibly not, though it's not without its merits. First, at least some of it sounds like it was recorded in the studio and subjected to some dubbing of live audience noise.

 In fact, a few of the tracks are definitely overdubbed versions of recordings that found official release as studio cuts. There are, however, a few songs that they didn't put on any other release in the 1960s, those being covers of "Kansas City," "Johnny B. Goode," Roger Miller's "King of the Road" and "Chug-a-Lug," Glenn Miller's "In the Mood" done Merseybeat style, and, even odder, the Beatles' "Eight Days a Week." "Tutti Frutti," "Shakin' Feeling," and "Good Golly Miss Molly" are sung in German, but these are obviously the studio recordings the Swinging Blue Jeans released for the German market overdubbed with live ambient noise. Of the songs not available elsewhere, actually the group does attack these with vigor, especially "Johnny B. Goode." In all, however, it has to be considered a very peripheral item, even for big Swinging Blue Jeans/Merseybeat enthusiasts. A CD reissue adds four bonus tracks, those being all four of the German-language studio recordings they did in which they re-recorded some of the songs they'd placed on their standard releases.



1. The Swinging blue Jeans - Kansas City (2:32)

2. The Swinging blue Jeans - Johnny Be Good (2:36)

3. The Swinging blue Jeans - Tutti Frutti (1:57)

4. The Swinging blue Jeans - Eight Days A Week (2:36)

5. The Swinging blue Jeans - Chug-A-Lug (1:57)

6. The Swinging blue Jeans - I've Got A Girl (2:24)

7. The Swinging blue Jeans - king Of The Road (2:31)

8. The Swinging blue Jeans - Long Tall Sally (2:22)

9. The Swinging blue Jeans - Good Golly Miss Molly (2:02)

10. The Swinging blue Jeans - In The Mood (5:43)

11. The Swinging blue Jeans - Das ist prima (2:12)

12. The Swinging blue Jeans - Tutti Frutti, German version (1:58)

13. The Swinging blue Jeans - Das ist vorbei (2:44)

14. The Swinging blue Jeans - Das ist prima (2:05)

15. The Swinging blue Jeans - Good Golly Miss Molly, German version (2:04)

Beryl Marsden - Rares Compilation + Bonus SHOTGUN EXPRESS

Beryl Marsden was one of the undeservedly neglected singers to come out of the Liverpool beat boom. A powerful vocalist with a fine sense of style, she was a precocious talent similar to Lulu in that she could bring her own style and stamp to American R&B and soul standards from her mid-teens onward. Born Beryl Hogg (and no relation to Gerry Marsden of Gerry & the Pacemakers) in Liverpool, she began her professional career backed by a band called the Crew and was signed to Decca Records in 1963.

She released a pair of singles on the label that somehow failed to click, the first ("I Know") rather inexplicably and the second, a cover of "When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes," when the Supremes' version eclipsed it. Marsden had the distinction of being one of the earliest performers to be managed by Tony Stratton-Smith, a sports journalist turned music maven who later founded Charisma Records and managed such acts as the Nice, Genesis, and Lindisfarne. Marsden jumped to EMI's Columbia label in 1965 and lasted there for two singles, of which "Break-A-Way" -- arranged and conducted by Ivor Raymonde, outdoing his work with Dusty Springfield -- was a British pop-soul jewel. After the failure of her single "What's She Got" in 1966, Marsden changed her approach to music. Her solo career having failed to ignite sales, Marsden joined Rod Stewart in Shotgun Express and after that moved on to a stint with an all-girl band called She Trinity before linking up with Paddy Chambers (of Paddy, Klaus & Gibson) in a group called Sinbad. During the 1970s, she also performed as a member of a group called the Gamblers. Marsden was most visible on record as a session vocalist and resumed her work as a solo act in the 1980s. Perhaps her high point as a singer -- and the highest tribute ever paid this underrated talent -- was her stint performing as a member of the latter-day Martha & the Vandellas alongside Martha Reeves. Marsden never recorded enough during the 1960s to support a compilation album, much less a CD of her work, which has reappeared as part of anthologies such as Deram Records' The Girls' Scene ("When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes"), EMI's Beat at Abbey Road 1963-1965 ("Break-A-Way"), and her rendition of the Shirelles' "Everybody Loves a Lover" appeared on See for Miles' 1985 compilation LP At the Cavern.





SHOTGUN EXPRESS -
 I COULD FEEL THE WHOLE WORLD TURN ROUND (1966)


Beryl Marsden - vocals

Rod Stewart - harmonica/vocals (born January 10th 1945, London)

Peter Bardens - organ

Peter Green - guitar (born Peter Greenbaum, October 29th 1946, London)

Phil Sawyer - guitar

Dave Ambrose - bass guitar

Mick Fleetwood - drums (born June 24th 1942, London)



Shotgun Express were a short-lived band, they only stayed together for a few months from late '66 - early '67. Their main importance lies in what the individual members went on to achieve with other groups. Rod Stewart joined ex-Yardbird Jeff Beck in The Jeff Beck Group, Green and Fleetwood were briefly with John Mayall's Bluesbreakers before going on to form Fleetwood Mac, and Bardens was with The Love Affair before forming Village.
 
1. Shotgun Express - I could feel the whole world turn round ® (3:14)

2. Shotgun Express - Curtains (2:21)

3. Shotgun Express - Funny 'cos neither could I ® (2:56)

4. Shotgun Express - Indian thing ® (3:00)
 
 
 THANKS McLuhan's Garden FOR SINGLE

Faron's Flamingos 1963 - See If She Cares


Faron's Flamingos was one of the most promising Liverpool outfits never to have a hit, even locally, this despite the fact that its members came from and went to some successful and much better remembered bands. Originally linking up under the name the Ravens (aka Robin & the Ravens) in 1959, when few people over the age of 20 even in Liverpool were paying much attention to the city's music scene, their initial lineup was Nicky Crouch (guitar, vocals), Billy Jones (guitar, vocals), Eric London (bass), and Trevor Morais (drums). Bill Ruffley (aka Faron Ruffley), who had previously sung with the Tempest Tornados, came in as lead singer two years later -- it was legendary Liverpool DJ Bob Wooler who reportedly suggested Faron's Flamingos as a successor name in 1961.
Their lineup was in a state of flux almost from the get-go, with Eric London and Billy Jones exiting in 1962 -- Dave "Mushy" Cooper, late of the Liverpool group the Undertakers, succeeded London on bass and guitarist/singer Paddy Chambers joined soon after. The group had long held a reputation for a wild and exciting stage act, featuring comedic acrobatics by Faron and Morais, and they were sufficiently successful to tour France in 1962, before the Liverpool beat boom had even taken hold. By early 1963, their lineup had changed again, with Cooper exiting and Faron taking over on bass, in addition to being lead singer. The group somehow almost managed to miss the beat explosion that came up in the wake of the Beatles' initial success. At a point where any four guys with instruments were getting screened for studio auditions, Faron's Flamingos just got in under the wire, recording "Let's Stomp," "So Fine," and "Talkin' 'Bout You," all reasonably powerful, thumping pieces of rock & roll, for the multi-artist album This Is Merseybeat.

They also got a short-lived contract with Oriole Records, the largest independent label in England, and their August 1963 single of "Do You Love Me" was reputedly the first Liverpool 45-rpm release of a Motown song, but Oriole unwisely put it out initially as the B-side of "See If She Cares." Within a matter of days, Brian Poole -- allegedly coaxing the words out of Faron at a tavern -- had covered the same song (less competently) as part of Brian Poole & the Tremeloes for England's Decca Records, and scored a major hit (though even their rendition was eclipsed by the Dave Clark Five's version). The group's October 1963 release of "Shake Sherry" b/w "Give Me Time" did no better, and by the end of the following month, they'd decided collectively to pack it in. Faron and Paddy Chambers became members of the second lineup of the Big Three (another Liverpool group, much bigger, that also never made it), Nicky Crouch became a member of the Liverpool band the Mojos, and Trevor Morais achieved success with the jazz-based trio the Peddlers. Faron, who had been known in the local music press as "the Panda-footed Prince of Prance" for his flamboyance on-stage, re-formed a version of Faron's Flamingos in 1965 and made a career in France until the late '60s, and in subsequent years had a Liverpool version of the band that included ex-Undertakers saxman Brian Jones. Faron was later sidelined by serious health problems, though he remains well-liked in Liverpool and has performed on rare occasions. Faron's Flamingos remains one of the most intriguing footnotes of the Merseybeat boom. They enjoyed a very brief, faint flash of international recognition alongside the Undertakers, Lee Curtis & the All Stars, Rory Storm & the Hurricanes, etc., in the mid-'70s when -- amid the boom of interest in '60s sounds, including the early British beat era -- various singles and anthologies devoted to the Merseybeat scene were reissued, most notably British United Artists' double-LP Merseybeat 1962-1964. ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide


Faron's Flamingoes - Do You Love Me.

Faron's Flamingoes - Give me time.

Faron's Flamingoes - Lets stomp (live, with spoken intro) rare!!.

Faron's Flamingoes - Let's Stomp.

Faron's Flamingoes - Secret love.

Faron's Flamingoes - See If She Cares.

Faron's Flamingoes - Shake Sherry.

Faron's Flamingoes - So fine.

Faron's Flamingoes - Talk about you.

HOMBRES & THE SKUNKS -Let It Out & Gettin Started





ALBUM:

1 Let It Out  (Verve Forecast) 1967
2 Gettin Started (Verve-Forecast ) 1969


HOMBRES

Personnel:


B.B. CUNNINGHAM
JOHNNY WILL HUNTER
JERRY LEE MASTERS
GARY WAYNE MOEWEN

The Hombres started life as the road band version of Ronny & the Daytonas of "G.T.O." fame; guitarist Gary McEwen, organist B. B. Cunningham (brother of Box Tops bassist Bill Cunningham), and bassist John Hunter had all attended Memphis High before they became the touring version of the Daytonas. They spent years playing under that name and doing that repertory, but had greater aspirations. Cunningham and McEwen authored a song called "Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out)," which seemed like it had some possibilities as a single. It took them the better part of a year to get anyone in the business interested, during which bassist Jerry Lee Masters joined their lineup. Finally, Shelby Singleton brought producer Huey P. Meaux aboard to produce the record, which was issued by Verve Forecast in the summer of 1967. By that time, the group had briefly worked as the Bandits before settling on the name the Hombres. Cunningham sang lead and spoke the introduction on the folksy, country-ish narrative, filled with lyrics saturated in elements of surrealism reminiscent of Bob Dylan's mid-'60s work. This was no accident — Cunningham admitted in a Goldmine interview that their original inspiration for the song had been Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues," which they regarded as a goof masquerading as something profound; but "Let It Out" was even more over-the-top, and also had a decided working-class southern feel that made it a little more regionally appealing than its inspiration, and a short two-minute-and-six-second running time, which made it ideal for radio. "Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out)" entered the charts in September of 1967 and rose to number 12 nationally. The band tried issuing more humor-laced singles, including "Am I High (Boy Am I High)," and an LP that disappeared without leaving a trace, and the Hombres were history by 1969.
 
THE SKUNKS
Personnel:


RICK ALLEN (SUTHERLAND)
TONY KOLP
DUANE LUNDY LARRY LYNNE (real name OSTRICKI)
TEDDY PEPLINSKI
JACK TAPPY
RANDY KLEIN
PAUL EDWARDS (FREDERICKS)
 
Originally a Milwaukee rock'n'roll combo called The Bonnevilles, they got the British Invasion bug and adopted the name, and hairstyle of, Skunks. Their debut 45 was recorded during a brief period in California but was released as by the Unbelievables, possibly because they caught the whiff of other Skunks around at the same time (one such had a 45 in 1965 - Youthquake / A Girl Like You, on Mercury).

The album is a patchwork of disparate styles - from pop covers and crooners to folk-rockers (the Byrds-like I Need No One). They do venture into garage and psych territory so the highlights, from our viewpoint, are a cover of Jefferson Airplane's Somebody To Love (with psychedelic guitar work), When I Need Her (good punk-psych) and The Journey (chiming folk-rock tinged with psychedelia).

1. HOMBRES - Let It All Hang Out 2'05

2. HOMBRES - Little 2+2 1'41

3. HOMBRES - So Sad 3'50

4. HOMBRES - Gloria 5'42

5. HOMBRES - Am I High 2'43

6. HOMBRES - Mau Mau Mau 2'16

7. HOMBRES - This Little Girl 1'54

8. HOMBRES - Sorry 'bout That 2'15

9. HOMBRES - Ya Ya 3'14

10.HOMBRES - Hey Little Girl 1'46

11.HOMBRES - Its A Gass 1'51

12. THE SKUNKS - Elvira 2'15

13. THE SKUNKS - The Journey 2'16

14. THE SKUNKS - It's Only Love 2'30

15. THE SKUNKS - When I Need Her 3'19

16. THE SKUNKS - I Need No One 2'04

17. THE SKUNKS - The Night Before 2'23

18. THE SKUNKS - Little Angel 1'50

19. THE SKUNKS - It's Too Late 3'30

20. THE SKUNKS - Knock On Wood 2'35

21. THE SKUNKS - Somebody To Love 2'25

22. THE SKUNKS - Watch To Flowers Grow 3'35

23. THE SKUNKS - I Belive 1'45

Lloyd Thaxton & The Challengers - Goes Surfing (1963)


This is album by the surfband The Challengers band. This album was issued in 1963, at the peak of the "surf wave", in South California. This record was an "hard to find" Lp, until the Sundazed Records cie (on the Yesterdazed Series) released it back, in 1994, with 2 previously unissued bonus tracks.



Lloyd Thaxton is host-producer of one of the highest rated musical shows in Hollywood. Born in Memphis, Tennesse, and brought up in Toledo, Ohio, Lloyd moved his familly to Hollywood in 1957. The LLOYD THAXTON SHOW is a favorite not only for teenagers, but with their parents as well, because the show is more than a dance-party; it is filled with a variety of crazy and entertaining gimmicks.

By the time "Surfing With The Challengers" was issued in the Spring of 1963, the band become one of the most visible and influential musical groupe in the Southern California. Every records store in the area was selling this, and their first album "Surfbeat like crazy. Wallich's Music City, at Sunset and Vine in Hollywood, even had an entire window display devoted to the band. They were on local TV dance shows every week it seemed, and appeareared at the Y-Day Concert at the Hollywood Bowl.
The Choice of the tracks used for "Surfing With The Challengers" repeated the approach followed on their first album: unique surf instrumetal versions of late 50's rock instrumental (songs by Duane Eddy, The Fireballs and The Ventures) coupled with The Challenger's originals. This served to emphasize how much the new genre of surf music had been inspired by the rich heritage of rock instrumentals from the "golden age' just three or four years before.
The choice of material, and the wonderful crisp and restrained production of both this album and the earlier Surfbeat, were inspirational to most teen bands at the time. This is even more than the records by Dick Dale or The Beach Boys, was THE sound of Surf Music.


One of the most popular of the early Southern Californian surf bands, the Challengers were formed by drummer Richard Delvy after he left the Bel-Airs, who had recorded one of the very first surf singles, "Mr. Moto." Their debut LP, Surfbeat (early 1963), was one of the very first all-instrumental surf albums and sold 200,000 copies, an astronomical number for a regional act.

1. Thaxton L & challengers - 01 - Moondawg 1963 (pr) (2:51)

2. Thaxton L & challengers - 02 - Dance with me guitar man 1963 (p) (2:17)

3. Thaxton L & challengers - 03 - Comin' home baby 1963 (p) (2:18)

4. Thaxton L & challengers - 04 - You can't sit down 1963 (p) (2:57)

5. Thaxton L & challengers - 05 - Foot patter 1963 (p) (2:27)

6. Thaxton L & challengers - 06 - Rampage 1963 (2:18)

7. Thaxton L & challengers - 07 - Ventures medley 1963 (p) (3:02)

8. Thaxton L & challengers - 08 - Surfers pony 1963 (p) (2:15)

9. Thaxton L & challengers - 09 - The twomp 1963 (2:03)

10. Thaxton L & challengers - 10 - Tidal wave 1963 (p) (2:15)

11. Thaxton L & challengers - 11 - Satan's theme 1963 (2:26)

12. Thaxton L & challengers - 12 - So what 1963 (2:13)

13. Thaxton L & challengers - 13 - Out of limits 1963 (p) (2:17)

14. Thaxton L & challengers - 14 - Moondawg (prev) 1963 (2:19)

Cay & The Scaffolds Complete Recordings (1963-1964)



Cay Karlsson

Born December 24th, 1945 in Helsinki, Finland. A Finnish singer and musician who has never had a solo career but has been a member of many known bands: Cay & The Scaffolds, Roosters .
The Scaffolds started their life as a "rautalanka", instrumental guitar band in the autumn of 1961. The group comprised of Harry Bergholm (lead guitar), Christer Bergholm (bass), Ulf Dolk (rhythm guitar) and Jan Nordberg (drums). The two last-named were soon replaced by Arto Lönnfors and Mårten Wikström.Their first gig was in the winter of 1962 at a friend's wedding. A year later they signed a contract with Musiikkitalo Westerlund, who released two instrumental singles: "Dark Eyes Beat" and "Katariinan kamarissa".



In the spring of 1963 Harry and Mårten visited London and brought The Beatles' debut LP with them, resulting in several of its songs being added to The Scaffolds' setlist. They were assumedly the first Finnish band who performed Beatles songs.

When Harry and Mårten left to serve in the army, new men Mårten Enqvist and Hannu Euramaa replaced them, and the lineup was augmented with vocalist Cay Karlsson. The boys started writing material themselves, and the next six singles and one EP they did during the next 11 months consisted almost entirely of songs by either Christer, Arto or Cay. The band was at the height of their popularity, and they could almost be called the Finnish Beatles, since they were the only band that had properly screaming girls in their audience.
1. The Scaffolds - Dark Eyes Beat (2:03)

2. The Scaffolds - Tullalla Twist (1:44)

3. The Scaffolds - Katariinan kammarissa (2:12)

4. The Scaffolds - Crazy Horse (1:48)

5. Cay & the Scaffolds - Jingle Bells Twist (2:20)

6. Cay & the Scaffolds - Girls (2:28)

7. Cay & the Scaffolds - You Are My Everything (2:07)

8. Cay & the Scaffolds - I'm Wond'ring (1:56)

9. Cay & the Scaffolds - Far Away (3:03)

10. The Scaffolds - Ghost Train (1:58)

11. The Scaffolds - You (1:56)

12. Cay & the Scaffolds - Stay with Me (2:06)

13. Cay & the Scaffolds - Would You Like to Dance (1:50)

14. Cay & the Scaffolds - How Can You Do This (1:43)

15. Cay & the Scaffolds - The Look of You (2:01)

16. The Scaffolds - I Wanna Be (2:39)

17. The Scaffolds - Sweet Sally (2:40)

18. The Scaffolds - You're Running Out of Money (2:03)

19. The Scaffolds - Wonderful Time (2:44)

THANKS ROCKROSCHA for SHARING

Brian Poole & The Tremeloes - Do you love me


It's difficult for anyone who has heard them not to like -- or even love -- the Tremeloes. They were one of the more prodigiously talented British pop/rock bands of the 1960s, and they threw that talent into the making of amazingly catchy and well-crafted singles that lit up the charts and radio on both sides of the Atlantic for four years running, from 1966 through 1970.


Yet, the Tremeloes are also one of the least-known and least-respected of 1960s English bands. The precise reason for the lack of respect is difficult to pin down, except perhaps that their timing was out, as far as making the most of their success. They generally didn't write their own material, and they cut their best singles long after the British Invasion (and the mystique surrounding the bands that were part of it) had ended. And, yet, ironically, the Tremeloes are also one of the longest surviving English rock & roll bands, playing regularly more than 40 years after the group's founding.
The band first got together in 1958, when the original members were all in their teens. They were closer in years and background to early British beat bands like the Shadows than to the British Invasion bands with which they subsequently became associated. The original lineup of Brian Poole (vocals, guitar), Alan Blakley (drums), Alan Howard (sax), and Graham Scott (guitar) had Buddy Holly's Crickets as their inspiration. This version of the band didn't stay together long, however, and Blakley quickly switched to guitar (which Poole relinquished) after Dave Munden joined on the drums. Munden proved not only to be a very talented percussionist but also a good singer. This gave the group a third vocalist, which would prove essential to their success further on in their history. Alan Howard also switched to bass soon after Munden joined.
The band -- then known as "the Tremilos" thanks to a misspelling -- built up a following at local dances and clubs, and then broke into the U.S. air-base circuit, where the length of the sets that they were forced to play required them to learn a massive number of new songs. By 1961, they had turned professional. The group's lineup changed again around that time when Graham Scott left and was replaced by Rick West (born Rick Westwood), who had previously played with Tony Rivers & the Castaways.
West's arrival was key to the group's long-term success, providing the band with a top-flight (indeed, classically trained) guitarist. They also got a professional manager in the guise of Peter Walsh, who already represented such acts as the Brook Brothers (England's answer to the Everly Brothers) and the vocal group the Kestrels. The band's first break happened soon after when they were spotted by Jimmy Grant, the producer of the BBC's Saturday Club music showcase, who got them an audition for the BBC. This led to the group becoming regulars on radio, and, in turn, resulted in an audition for Decca Records on New Year's Day, 1962. At the time, Decca was looking for a new rock & roll act, and the Tremeloes were up against a relatively obscure Liverpool quartet called the Beatles. Decca executives Dick Rowe and Mike Smith were in charge of the auditions, with Rowe reportedly leaving the choice up to Smith. The latter chose the Tremeloes, reportedly based on the fact that they were based in London and, thus, would be more accessible than the Beatles.
The signing had a range of consequences for the band and its future. At the time, it was routine for groups to have a featured member, Cliff Richard & the Shadows being the prime example; thus, the label insisted that the band be signed as Brian Poole & the Tremeloes.
The band accepted this as one price of pursuing success, and Poole became the perceived star of the band. They cut a series of records backing other artists -- including the Vernons Girls ("The Locomotion") and DJ Jimmy Savile, on the latter's version of "Ahab the Arab," as well as some failed singles of their own -- got into the lineup of artists in the juke-box comedy film Just for Fun, and generally missed even modest chart action by the length of their fingertips; their singles of "Twist Little Sister" and "Keep on Dancing" failed to find audiences, despite some valiant efforts at promotion. Success seemed to become less likely as 1963 wore on and a new wave of English rock & roll acts, spearheaded, ironically enough, by the Beatles, began dominating the radio and the charts.
Rather than wilting in this new environment, Brian Poole & the Tremeloes rose to the challenge. They changed their look and pumped up the rhythm-guitar parts in their songs, and began looking at R&B, rather than white rock & roll, as a source of material and inspiration.
The result was their version of "Twist and Shout," which managed to rise to number four on the English charts, despite running up head-to-head with the Beatles' recording, issued on an EP that summer. Their next record, a cover of the Contours' hit "Do You Love Me," was a classic of the era, an honest, authentic-sounding screamer of a single that hit number one in England once the Beatles' "She Loves You" vacated the spot, and managed to eclipse a rival version by the Dave Clark Five. In its wake, Brian Poole & the Tremeloes managed a series of respectable, even occasionally inspired hits over the next two years, including a U.K. Top Ten cover of Roy Orbison's "Candy Man" and a convincingly raucous rendition of the Strangeloves' Bo Diddley-beat-driven anthem "I Want Candy."
They appeared on film, most notably a pair of performance clips in the feature film Go Go, Big Beat, and a featured spot in A Touch of Blarney, and made the rounds of the television-music showcases, charting moderately well until the end of 1965. The band ran into hard times just about then, owing to issues of music and style.
Possibly it was a result of the fact that they'd never really been part of the British Invasion, but the Tremeloes had never seen fit to update their image, which had been something of a pose to start with. They still dressed in matching suits on stage, and performed the same brand of stomping covers of American R&B and rock & roll. It was no longer possible to expect those to chart, however. Their competition wasn't the Dave Clark Five or Gerry & the Pacemakers, but the likes of much heavier and musically higher-powered bands such as the Yardbirds and the Kinks, not to mention the rapidly evolving Beatles and Rolling Stones; all of whom seemed to up the musical ante, in terms of what sounds and instruments they brought to the table, with each new release. Additionally, Poole had emerged as the star of the group and developed a star mentality, and became convinced that his future lay in a career as a pop-oriented vocalist, in the manner of such up-and-coming figures as Tom Jones. The chart failure of their cover of the Olympics' "Good Lovin'" brought a halt to the success the quintet had been enjoying, and started Poole looking out for his own interests and future.
By the end of 1965, the split was in the works. The band was inactive in the studio for almost six months while the mechanics of Poole's exit worked themselves out. The consensus in the music press was that Poole was poised for stardom, while the Tremeloes were believed to be headed for oblivion. His singing had been the focus of their singles, he was the "name," and little that the group had done on record had distinguished the other members.
Instead, Poole ended up disappeared from view after a series failed singles, and ultimately left music. The Tremeloes had their own problems, including the exit of bassist Alan Howard, who was replaced by Mike Clark, a former bandmate of West's, and then by Len "Chip" Hawkes. In the meantime, they'd released a single covering the Paul Simon song "Blessed," a rather improbably dissonant song which failed to chart and got the band dropped by Decca. The members' own best musical instincts, coupled with changes in the British record industry, helped rescue them.

Although they'd been written off in the press, the Tremeloes themselves knew better what they were capable of. They had three competent singers, including a lead vocalist in the form of Hawkes, and an excellent if somewhat underrated guitarist in Rick West; and they had eight years of experience as a band, and had retooled their sound before.
Additionally, they had a good and dedicated friend in the guise of Mike Smith, who'd exited Decca in 1966. Smith was now in the employ of the newly created CBS Records label, the British outlet for America's Columbia Records. The new label was hungry for homegrown talent to augment the label's roster of American stars, and Smith convinced CBS to sign the Tremeloes.
The band updated its look and image, and then they returned to the same source whence they had got their first chart single, "Twist and Shout," back in 1963: the Beatles. The band by now was beyond peer, and each of their albums had songs that could have charted.
The Tremeloes grabbed onto one of them, "Good Day Sunshine." It never charted, but it did re-establish the Tremeloes' name as a credible force in their own right, getting played heavily, receiving good reviews in the music press, and helping the band get onto television. More important, it allowed the group to transform its image into a more contemporary one.
It was the band's next single that put them back on track. "Here Comes My Baby," written by Cat Stevens, became an infectiously tuneful, upbeat song, with very pleasing harmony vocals and solid playing in the hands of the Tremeloes. It became a number-four hit in England for the group and even made it to number 13 in America, pleasing the group, CBS/Columbia, and Mike Smith to no end. (Smith also brought a similar Scottish group, the Marmalade, also managed by Walsh, to British CBS with successful results).
This was the break they needed. The Tremeloes were suddenly booked alongside the Hollies, Paul Jones, and the Spencer Davis Group, where they proceeded to roll over the rest of the show with their sound and style. The group was suddenly poised for greater things than they'd ever seemed capable of during their days at Decca. "Silence Is Golden," a popular concert number, became their next single and their first chart-topper in England since "Do You Love Me," ascending to number 11 in America during the spring of 1967, and becoming their second U.S. gold record.
For all of their reputation as a pop/rock band, the Tremeloes had a surprisingly progressive and musically sophisticated edge. Rick West's fuzz-tone guitar on "Let Your Hair Hang Down," "What a State I'm In," and "Suddenly Winter" (B-sides all) were a match for anything that Jeff Beck, Davy O'List, or any of the other progressive axemen of the era were doing; and according to historian Roger Dopson, West had it one up on all of them, because he was the first guitarist in England to perfect the use of the fuzz-tone on-stage. They also harmonized nearly as beautifully as the Beatles, and if Chip Hawkes wasn't a match for Paul McCartney in his bass playing, he was still a strong, melodic player. "Even the Bad Times Are Good," "Be Mine," "Silence Is Golden" (a number-one hit), "Suddenly You Love Me," "Helule Helule," "My Little Lady," "All the World to Me," and "I'm Gonna Try" -- songs whose respective beats, harmonies, and hooks half the groups in England or America would have killed to put together -- were all achingly catchy, rousing, perfect pop/rock creations; and even those experimental B-sides were tuneful in ways that many progressive rock tracks by the Nice and the Yardbirds weren't.
The Tremeloes toured America just as the Summer of Love was blossoming and managed to chart their album Here Comes the Tremeloes on that side of the Atlantic, while its U.K. version got to number 15. The next three years saw them move from success to success in England and around the world, with another three singles in the U.K. Top Ten and two more in the British Top 40; tours of three continents only confirmed that they could reach audiences well beyond the Sceptered Isle.
In a sense, the Tremeloes' music filled a gap that was left when bands like the Beatles and the Hollies started getting serious and intense in their writing and messages, and groups like Gerry & the Pacemakers disappeared. There was still an audience out there for well-sung and inventively played pop/rock, songs that were fun to hear on the radio and to hum or sing to. In America, outfits like the Monkees, Paul Revere & the Raiders, and bubblegum rockers such as the Ohio Express and the 1910 Fruitgum Company on Buddha Records were filling this same gap in slightly different variations.
The Tremeloes, as it happened, were musically very strong, which was one of the reasons that they survived and thrived across an entire decade of stylistic changes in popular music. Rick West, in particular, was a virtuoso guitarist who was respected by his peers, and deserves a place in the annals of British rock music not too far behind George Harrison. Hawkes and Munden shared the lead vocal responsibilities (with West doing harmonies), while Hawkes -- somewhat younger and more conventionally attractive than the rest of the band -- became the resident heartthrob for the band's teenybopper fans, sort of the Tremeloes' answer to the Raiders' Mark Lindsay.
They went along well for three years, their one seeming error a popish, elegantly harmonized cover (accompanied by the Keith Mansfield Strings) of Bob Dylan's then-new song "I Shall Be Released," that barely made the U.K. Top 30 (although to listen to it today, it seems like a perfectly good interpretation, and more tasteful and valid than the Hollies' attempts at doing Dylan songs). Then, in 1970, the band committed a series of grave errors that started innocently enough. The members, apparently weary of being treated as a soft pop band, decided to change their sound and image, but they couldn't have chosen a worse way in which to do it.
Rather than go along making the kind of exquisitely crafted pop/rock that had served them well since late 1966, the Tremeloes decided it was time to be taken seriously. Just what they were thinking at the time was anyone's guess. After three years of tapping into the same market that Paul McCartney had cultivated through the Beatles and his early solo career, they felt the need to emulate John Lennon, Bob Dylan, et al. (Author's Note: They might better have taken a look at Preston Sturges' movie Sullivan's Travels, about a movie director with the same impulse; he learns that making people laugh and making them feel happy is the most serious and important business that there is, and something not everyone can do).
They spent a year writing and preparing an album of music that was intended to prove they could do serious songs, and that was not, in and of itself, a mistake. The error came when the group announced their intention and, in the process, disparaged all of their past hits and dismissed the listeners whom they had attracted as "morons." When the smoke cleared, the group had managed to alienate most of their listeners and any representative of the music press who had previously been in their corner, while the new music, the album Master, was ignored by the very people they'd sought to attract. Even in the midst of this debacle, the band showed that it still had the golden touch. "Me and My Life," which was a tuneful number off the album, reached number four in England, while its B-side, "Try Me," was a first-rate rock & roll number.
Beyond that point, the group seemed to lose its rudder. They tried sounding heavy ("Right Wheel, Left Hammer, Sham") and country ("Hello Buddy"), spoofing glam rock with "Blue Suede Tie," and even changed their name (the Trems). By the mid-'70s, the Tremeloes were playing in cabaret, a strategy similar to that of the Searchers and a few other surviving '60s bands. They never stopped working, or were without work, however; Dave Munden was there on drums and Rick West stayed on guitar, and the group cut music for DJM, Pye, and Polydor intermittently, before briefly returning to CBS in the early '80s.
In the late '90s, Munden and West were still there, with keyboardist/singer/engineer Joe Gillingham and bassist/guitarist/singer Davey Freyer, playing regular gigs in England and Europe. The group's Decca sides with Poole (who since re-emerged as a singer, sometimes billed on CDs as "Brian Poole OF the Tremeloes") have been reissued on CD by Decca Records, but are rather difficult to find; by contrast, Rhino, Sequel, and Repertoire Records each has out a collection of the Tremeloes' post-1965 hits. The band keeps an active website up and bids fair, at this rate, to be busy for their golden anniversary in rock & roll before the end of the first decade of the 21st century.


1. Tremeloes - Do You Love Me (2:21)

2. Tremeloes - You Can't Sit Down (2:11)

3. Tremeloes - Baby Workout (2:25)

4. Tremeloes - South Street (2:16)

5. Tremeloes - Time Is On My Side (2:33)

6. Tremeloes - Twenty Miles (2:00)

7. Tremeloes - Keep On Dancing (1:55)

8. Tremeloes - Rag Doll (2:49)

9. Tremeloes - Twist Little Sister (1:55)

10. Tremeloes - What Do You Want With My Baby (2:21)

11. Tremeloes - Chills (1:48)

12. Tremeloes - Twist And Shout (2:02)

The Pleazers -Definitely Definitive (1965-1966)



Originally an Australian band from Brisbane, known as 'Johnny Gray and The G Men'. They were hired to as a backing band for 'The London Brothers', Billy Bacon and Bob Cooper back in 1964. At that time the band cosisted of, Jimmy Cerezo, lead guitar, Peter Newing, rhythm guitar, Bruce Robinson, bass guitar and me on drums.




Band Members:

Billy London (Vocals)
Bob Cooper (Vocals)
Bruce Robinson (Lead Guitar)
Peter Newing (Rhythm Guitar)
Ronnie Peel (Bass)
Dennis Gilmore (Drums)



They were joined by Bob Cooper and decided to change their name to the Pleazers. They then went professional and at this point Vince Lipton decided to leave and was replaced by Bruce Robinson (Bass). The band moved to Sydney, losing Jim Cerezo on the way, so Robinson moved to lead guitar and Ronnie Peel joined on bass.
It was while playing in Sydney that they were noticed by Zodiac owner, Eldred Stebbing, who brought them to New Zealand in 1964, with a promise of guaranteed work and unlimited studio time. They started playing at the Shiralee and also appeared on the TV show Let's Go. They looked to be set to take the nation by storm, but fell out with TV producers and were subsequently banned from the airwaves. They started looking scruffier and seemed more comfortable with this image.

Their first single, 'Last Night'/'Poor Girl', got minor response. It wasn't until they released their follow-up song, a cover of Them's 'Gloria', with 'That Lonely Feeling' on the reverse, in February 1965, that saw them get any action on the charts. Seven singles, one EP called 'Midnight Rave', and one album called 'Definitely Pleazers' were released on the Zodiac label. The other singles were 'Like Columbus Did', 'Sometimes', 'Is It Over Baby', 'Hurtin' All Over', 'Guilty', 'Can't Pretend', 'Here Today', 'La La Lies' and 'Three Cool Cats', 'Security'.

Eldred Stebbing took over the Shiralee in 1966 and renamed it the Galaxie. He installed as resident bands, two of the raunchiest R&B groups around, The La De Da's and the Pleazers. The La De Da's fitted in well with the image of the club, but the Pleazers wanted to continue their rough looking image and Bob Cooper was soon replaced by Shane Hales. Cooper showed up with Hubb Kapp and the Wheels. Ronnie Peel left the group in 1966 and was replaced by Gus Fenwick from the Layabouts. The Pleazers went back to Australia in June 1966, but returned in March 1967, without Peter Newing, only to split up 6 months later.

They were one of the premier groups on the New Zealand scene, but their behaviour was far from acceptable in a staid New Zealand society. Peel spent a brief period with The La De Da's before moving to the UK and a stint with Thunderclap Newman. He later changed his name to Rockwell T James and performed well in Australia. Gus Fenwick also continued his career in Australia, before joining Shane Hales in the Shane Group, which evolved into the Apple. In Australia Gus was a member of the Bootleg Family Band, Healing Force, Nightflyer and Swanee.

Shane Hales had a short stint with Jamestown Union, before forming the Shane Group, and after that had a very successful solo career, while Bruce Robinson went on to join Troubled Mind, then Flinders and Rockinghorse.
 
1. The Pleazers - Baby Jane (1:57)

2. The Pleazers - Thou Shalt Not Steal (1:57)

3. The Pleazers - I'm Movin' On (2:13)

4. The Pleazers - Bald Headed Woman (2:48)

5. The Pleazers - Don't Gimme No Lip Child (2:16)

6. The Pleazers - Last Night (2:09)

7. The Pleazers - That Lonely Feeling (2:29)

8. The Pleazers - Gloria (2:38)

9. The Pleazers - Like Columbus Did (2:10)

10. The Pleazers - Is It Over Baby (2:31)

11. The Pleazers - Hurtin' All Over (2:42)

12. The Pleazers - Guilty (2:24)

13. The Pleazers - Here Today (2:55)

14. The Pleazers - La La Lies (2:11)

15. The Pleazers - Three Cool Cats (2:28)

16. The Pleazers - Security (2:14)

17. The Pleazers - Land Of A Thousand Dances (2:39)

18. The Pleazers - A Love Like Yours (2:54)

19. The Pleazers - Sometimes (2:33)

20. The Pleazers - Can't Pretend (2:07)

21. The Pleazers - Da Doo Ron Ron (2:26)

22. 22 - Dancing In The Streets

23. 23 - Without You

24. 24 - House Of The Rising Sun

25. 25 - Be My Baby

26. 26 - 175

27. 27 - Poor Girl

28. 28 - I Ain't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore
 
In the mid-'60s, the Pleazers were one of the only New Zealand groups competently playing tough, British Invasion/R&B-styled rock & roll; they were probably only second to the La-De-Da's in their homeland in this regard. They managed to record about half a dozen singles, an LP, and an EP, gaining a few hits in New Zealand and playing some stints in Australia during their brief life. Mixing typical covers of the time with fairly strong original material, the Pleazers were not an extraordinary band; in the United States or Britain, they would have been just another decent regional act. Tough rock bands were still a rarity in New Zealand, though, and so the Pleazers are still remembered there as trailblazers of sorts.

The Human Expression's - Love at Psychedelic Velocity (1966-1967)


But for a 1967 decision about which single to record, The Human Expression might've been a lot more than an obscure but beloved psychedelic band from Los Angeles. The band was formed in 1966 by Jim Quarles (lead vocals), Jim Foster (rhythm guitar), Martin Eshleman (lead guitar), Tom Hamilton (bass), and Armand Poulin (drums), with Quarles providing the name and Foster's father as their manager. They cut a demo single ("Everynight" b/w "Readin' Your Will," which got them a recording contract with Los Angeles-based Accent Records. An official single of "Everynight" b/w "Love at Psychedelic Velocity" was issued soon after.


The band played played local clubs and USOs, and built up a great reputation for their hot live performances -- they good deliver on-stage what most groups scarcely achieved on record, an intensely virtuoso musicality coupled with punk defiance and a charismatic projection of all of these elements. In a different reality, they might've been a more mature and serious competitor to the Seeds, perhaps even succeeding at doing what the Doors did, only without the literary pretensions or personal excesses -- equally impressive was the fact that most of the songs that the Human Expression played were originals by Quarles and Foster, who were entirely self-taught songwriters; Quarles later admitted that he wrote from his heart and instinct, without over-intellectualizing any of it, and the results seemed to pay off when coupled with the band's musicianship -- their demos were as good as many contemporary groups' released singles. A second single, "Optical Sound" b/w "Calm Me Down," released in 1967, showed the group becoming more experimental, utilizing studio electronic effects. "Optical Sound" itself, as a title, was extremely clever, carrying with it connotations out of both psychedelia and film. It was impressive, but that single wasn't the breakthrough that the band had hoped for.
The Human Expression's downfall came with the decision over what was to be their third single. Offered a pair of songs to choose from, they selected a number called "Sweet Child of Nothingness." The one they rejected was a song authored by Mars Bonfire called "Born to Be Wild," because Quarles had some doubts about the lyrics. This decision, which proved disastrous when Steppenwolf took their version of the song to the top of the charts, coincided with a major personnel shake-up -- lead guitarist Martin Eshleman was injured and had to be replaced, and Quarles didn't like the new lin-up and exited. The Human Expression's history ended, though Quarles continued writing songs and pursued some solo recording, and later establish his own studio. In 1994, Collectables Records released a 14-song CD (Love at Psychedelic Velocity) of the complete Human Expression demos and released singles, rounded out with a quartet of Quarles solo sides.


1. The Human Expression - Everynight (Demo) (2:43)

2. The Human Expression - Readin' Your Will (Demo) (2:47)

3. The Human Expression - Everynight (2:36)

4. The Human Expression - Love At Psychedelic Velocity (2:39)

5. The Human Expression - Calm Me Down (Demo) (2:24)

6. The Human Expression - Optical Sound (Demo) (2:34)

7. The Human Expression - Calm Me Down (2:24)

8. The Human Expression - Optical Sound (2:35)

9. The Human Expression - I Don't Need Nobody (2:57)

10. The Human Expression - Sweet Child Of Nothingness (3:10)

11. The Human Expression - Outside Of It All (Unreleased) (2:59)

12. The Human Expression - Following Me (Unreleased) (4:09)

13. The Human Expression - Who Is Burning? (Unreleased) (3:09)

14. The Human Expression - You Need Lovin' Too (Unreleased) (4:00)
 
In contrast to the typical psychedelic punk unearthings, which are pleasing if unexceptional period offerings, Love at Psychedelic Velocity is genuinely impressive (as are the Human Expression), and, what's more, impressive from the get-go. The demo version of "Everynight" is virtually a match for any piece of garage punk of 1966, and "Readin' Your Will," heard for the first time publicly, is as fine a piece of sneering teenage defiance as the Standells or the Chocolate Watch Band ever produced. Jim Quarles sings like a cross between Sky Saxon and Mick Jagger, depending on the song. The official version of "Everynight" is even better, and there's not a wrong note or move made on any of ten tracks by the Human Expression featured here. Even the four previously unissued Quarles solo tracks, while a little smooth and polished, have a pleasing psychedelic shimmer to them.

The Modbeats- Mod is... The British Modbeats (1967)


Founded in the mid-'60s by vocalist Fraser Loveman, guitarists Greig Foster and Mike Gorgichuk, bassist Joe Colonna and drummer Robbie Jeffrey, the Ontario-based British Modbeats played covers of British Invasion groups such as the Rolling Stones and Spencer Davis Group and posed as true Englishmen. Red Leaf Records signed them and released their 1967 album, Mod Is the British Modbeats. The band was gone by 1968

Fraser Loveman (vocals)
 Joe Colonna (bass)
 Robbie Jeffrey (drums)
 Greig Foster (guitar)
Mike Gorgichuk (guitar)


As their name suggests this Toronto, Ontario, outfit were heavily influenced by the British mod movement and dressed in the latest fashions set in London's Carnaby Street. This is largely explained by the fact that the band's vocalist and leader Fraser Loveman was British. A professional dancer, he had previously choreographed mod dance routines for himself and two Go-Go Girls.
They started out in Ste. Catherine, Ontario, in 1963 and were discovered by Ronn Metclafe who was the managing director of a night club there. By 1966 they had become the house band at the Castles Club in Ste. Catherine. They were originally known as The Modbeats. Musically they mainly recorded and played good cover versions of some of the classics of the era.

Unfortunately the musical content of the album is very tame compared to their dress sense - a competent 'club' sound that might appeal to beat fans but not to garage or psychedelic followers. They achieved some chart success, particularly with their cover of The Spencer Davis Group's hit, Somebody Help Me, which was originally penned by Jackie Edwards.
After they quit in late 1967, Loveman and Gorgichuk formed the Fraser Loveman Group which operated in Hamilton and Toronto and included members of Dr. Funk. Later Loveman played in S.T.O.P. which relocated to Boston. By 1969 they had changed their name again to Crocodile.


With the invasion of the Beatles in 1964 and the subsequent British Invasion later that year, the North American music industry was rocked to its foundation. In 1963 A St. Catharines Ventures-styled band called The Lintels were already aware of the British turmoil before it ever made it to Atlantic shores and so in late-'64/early '65 The British Modbeats were born. They were quick to capitalize on the craze and were the first to wear paisley, bell bottoms and shaggy hair driving Ontario teens out of their minds (and parents too but for totally different reasons). Ironically, the band only performed cover tunes, but the fans didn't care. They couldn't get enough and so, to fill the demand, the Modbeats released the Doris Troy song "Whatcha Gonna Do About It"s in 1966 followed by their debut album "Mod Is The British Modbeats" in 1967. The album spawned a hit single in "Somebody Help Me" followed by two others. The group would rise to the occasion with opening slots for The Rascals, The Byrds, The McCoys and play Expo '67 plus a pit stop at The Scene in New York City, but with the change in attitudes during the Beatles evolution on "Sgt. Pepper" and "The White Album", the hippie movement had taken hold and the Modbeats became redundant circa 1968. They subsequently turned down an offer to record with Phil Spector in Detroit feeling that the US was not a particular avenue they cared to pursue. Some of the members continued as The Modbeats and later as Looking Glass (different than the US band who had the hit "Brandy"). Fraser Loveman seemed to have the most success with appearances in theatre starring in "Hair" and "Annie Get Your Gun"; he had a 1920's styled dance act for awhile; played in The Village Stop from 1968-1970; formed the Fraser Loveman group in 1970 and the Yenmor Blues Band from 1972 to 1973; worked in a paper mill for 17 years; owned the St. Catharines concert hall Rock III. The British Modbeats reunited in 1989 for some one-off nostalgia revues at Lulu's in Kitchener and Prudhommes. Loveman would then move on to Cafe Bizarre and was last seen writing new material with Modbeats member Joe Colonna.

Singles


1966 Whatcha Gonna Do About It/Price Of Love (Red Leaf) 620 1967 Love's Just A Broken Heart/You're My World (Red Leaf) 625 1967 Somebody Help Me/Ain't Nobody Home But Me (Red Leaf) 632 1967 Try To Understand/Sorrow (Red Leaf) 636



Albums

1967 Mod Is The British Modbeats (Red Leaf)

1998 Mod Is The British Modbeats [CD re-issue] (Flash - Germany)
 
 
 
 
1 AIN'T NOBODY HOME


2 DON'T ANSWER ME

3 LADY *

4 LAND OF 1000 DANCES

5 LOVE'S A BROKEN HEART

6 LSD

7 NO MORE LOVE

8 SOMEBODY HELP ME

9 SORROW

10 THE RIGHT ONE *

11 TORRID ZONE *

12 TRY TO UNDERSTAND *

13 WALKING THE DOG **

14 WHATCHA GONNA DO ABOUT IT **

15 WHATCHA GONNA DO ABOUT IT ** ALT.
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