Thursday, September 30, 2010

Buddy Holly&The Crickets - Words Of Love ~ 28 Classic Songs Plus Rarities & Versions


Buddy Holly is perhaps the most anomalous legend of '50s rock & roll -- he had his share of hits, and he achieved major rock & roll stardom, but his importance transcends any sales figures or even the particulars of any one song (or group of songs) that he wrote or recorded. Holly was unique, his legendary status and his impact on popular music all the more extraordinary for having been achieved in barely 18 months.


Among his rivals, Bill Haley was there first and established rock & roll music; Elvis Presley objectified the sexuality implicit in the music, selling hundreds of millions of records in the process, and defined one aspect of the youth and charisma needed for stardom; and Chuck Berry... Read More...

Buddy Holly - 28 Classic Songs

01 - Words of Love
02 - That'll Be the Day
03 - Peggy Sue
04 - Think It Over
05 - True Love Ways
06 - What to Do
07 - Crying. Waiting. Hoping
08 - Well... All Right
09 - Love's Made a Fool of You
10 - Peggy Sue Got Married
11 - Valley of Tears
12 - Wishing
13 - Raining in My Heart
14 - Oh, Boy!
15 - Rave on
16 - Brown Eyed Handsome Man
17 - Bo Diddley
18 - It's So Easy
19 - It Doesn't Matter Anymore
20 - Maybe Baby
21 - Early in the Morning
22 - Love Is Strange
23 - Listen to Me
24 - I'm Gonna Love You Too
25 - Learning the Game
26 - Baby I Don't Care
27 - Heartbeat
28 - Everyday

Buddy Holly - Rarities & Versions

01 - Because I Love You
02 - Dearest (Um Um)
03 - Wait Till The Sun Shines Nelly
04 - Gone
05 - Rip It Up
06 - Honky Tonk
07 - Ain't Got No Home
08 - Holly Hop
09 - Mailman Bring Me No More Blues
10 - Not Fade Away
11 - Take Your Time
12 - Smokey Joe's Cafe
13 - Slippin' And Slidin' (fast version)
14 - Learning The Game (first version)
15 - Crying, Waitin, Hopin (first version)
16 - Dearest (version)
17 - Your'e The One
18 - Girl On My Mind
19 - That'll Be The Day (slow version)
20 - It's Too Late
21 - Think It Over
22 - Dearest (demo)
23 - Maybe Baby (first version)
24 - Because I Love You (first version)

...This is one of the finest collection of Buddy Holly you will ever find.

With all the classics you will find Peggy Sue, True Love Ways, Peggy Sue Got Married, Raining in My Heart, Oh Boy!, Rave On, Heartbeat & Everyday.

Then there is some of the lesser known ones which are What to Do, Valley of Tears, Early in the Morning, Love is Strange, I'm Gonna Love You Too & Learning the Game.

This is a classic collection which should be treasured for life... ~   W. Taylor

The Alan Bown! - Outward Brown Plus (1968)


The Alan Bown Set later known as The Alan Bown! or just Alan Bown, were a British band of the 1960s and 1970s whose music evolved from jazz and blues through soul and rhythm and blues and ended up as psychedelia and progressive rock. The band achieved limited chart success and is best known the for the role it played in developing the careers of numerous musicians including Mel Collins, John Helliwell, Robert Palmer, Jess Roden and Dougie Thomson.


Alan Bown made an improbable rock star -- though it could be argued that he was never really a "star." With the trumpet as his instrument, he wasn't even a terribly likely rock & roll bandleader, but he definitely was that, and for a lot of years. And if his bands' recordings had been as successful as their live shows, he'd likely have been a star and then some.

Any musical aspirations that he harbored were invisible until he completed a stint in the Royal Air Force at the outset of the 1960s. He found a music scene that was booming throughout England with an important extension to Germany, and which encompassed not only rock & roll but also blues, R&B, and jazz. The latter two areas were where Bown's interest lay, and he was soon a member of a group called the Embers that was booked into the Star Club in Hamburg, Germany, working on the same bills as such Liverpool-based artists as Tony Sheridan, the Beatles, the Undertakers, et al. He returned to England after the extended engagement and joined the John Barry Seven, led by the trumpeter/arranger John Barry. He was actually more involved with the group than Barry, whose burgeoning careers as a record producer and film music composer were taking off in a big way and keeping him busy outside of performing. When Barry disbanded the group in 1964, Bown picked up the pieces and formed an outfit of his own -- his proposed name was ABC, standing for Alan Bown Community, but at the behest of his manager he chose the Alan Bown Set instead. The sextet was an immediate success as a live act, and it became an audience and critical favorite in London.
Oddly enough, Bown and company never even thought about a recording contract, intending the band as a vehicle for steady work for themselves, doing what they enjoyed. It wasn't until a couple of years into their history that Tony Reeves (the future member of Colosseum), an A&R man for Pye Records, spotted the Alan Bown Set and got them under contract, which resulted in a string of 45s and half of an LP called London Swings that included part of their live show, in tandem with Jimmy James & the Vagabonds. The Pye contract ended in late 1967, and the group was then signed to the British division of MGM Records, to an imprint called Music Factory. By this time, they'd modified their image and sound -- the interest in R&B and soul was fading somewhat in the London clubs, even as psychedelic music was starting to become all the rage. And so, for its MGM/Music Factory releases, a somewhat longer-haired and more flamboyant version of Bown's band was seen, and in lieu of the Alan Bown Set, the group was simply known as the Alan Bown!, complete with exclamation point. They cut a song called "We Can Help You," which had originated with the British band Nirvana -- and the Alan Bown version started to make a splash in England in terms of exposure.
But on the week of the record's actual release, disaster struck on both sides of the Atlantic simultaneously. A strike at the plant where the record was pressed and due to ship from prevented its release, at precisely the moment when it had to be in stores. And MGM Records chose to abandon the Music Factory label -- though the Alan Bown! would remain with the company on the MGM label proper, this also meant that the company abandoned all promotional and distribution efforts involving the Music Factory releases. "We Can Help You," despite a string of promotional appearances by the band on its behalf (including the television show Top of the Pops), was left to die and rot on the vine, and the accompanying LP, called Outward Bown, was ignored. A pair of singles that followed, "Toyland" b/w "Technicolour Dream" and "Story Book" b/w "Little Lesley," both failed to chart. The album included the group's psychedelic pop version of Bob Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower," which the Alan Bown! had been doing in their live shows as well -- the record label would never consider it for a single release, but Jimi Hendrix (who apparently knew their version) was more successful with his own Track Records label and got a hit single out of the same song.
A contract with Deram Records, the progressive rock imprint of English Decca, followed, along with a pair of singles and a self-titled LP, and there was also a lineup shift that, for a time, brought Robert Palmer into the group as its lead singer. But despite a lot of touring and television exposure, and the reconstituting of its sound and image in a much more progressive rock vein, the group's moment had clearly passed by the start of the new decade. Even a signing to the Island label failed to re-ignite their commercial prospects, though Bown did keep a version of the band -- including Mel Collins on saxophone -- together for touring purposes as late as 1972. After that last tour, Bown himself -- following a short stay in a band called Jonesy -- moved on to a producer's spot with British CBS Records, where he was one of those involved with the signing of Mott the Hoople and Sailor. By the 1980s, he had long since abandoned performing in favor of the business side of the music business, and started his own production and publishing company. Thanks to the continued reissue of his '60s-era recordings, however, he remains a much-loved and fondly remembered figure as a performer, from the British beat era into the psychedelic period.

Personnel:

Alan Bown – Trumpet
Stan Haldane - Bass, Vocals
Jeff Bannister - Keyboards/Vocals
John Helliwell – Sax
Robert Palmer – Vocals
Vic Sweeney – Drums
Tony Catchpole – Guitar
Jess Roden – Vocals
Gordon Neville – Vocals
Andy Brown - Bass, Vocals
Albums:
Outward Bown (Music Factory MF 12000) 1967
CD: See For Miles SEECD490, 1998
The Alan Bown (Deram DML/SML 1049) 1968
CD: Universal, Japan, POCJ-2835, 1999
Listen (Island ILPS 9131) 1970
Stretching Out (Island ILPS 9163) 1971
CD: Listen/Stretching Out, Edsel EDCD362, 1993
+ CD: Emergency 999 - singles and previously unreleased tracks, Castle NEMCD483, 2000
45s:
Can't Let Her Go/I'm The One (Pye 7N 15934) 1965
Baby Don't Push Me/Everything's Gonna Be Alright (Pye 7N 17084) 1966
Headline News/Mister Pleasure (Pye 7N 17148) 1966
Emergency 999/Settle Down (Pye 7N 17192) 1966
Gonna Fix You Good (Everytime You're Bad)/I Really Really Care (Pye 7N 17256) 1967
We Can Help You/Magic Hankerchief (Music Factory CUB 1) 1967
Toyland/Technicolour Dream (MGM 1355) 1967
Story Book/Little Lesley (MGM 1387) 1968
Still As Stone/Wrong Idea (Deram DM 259) 1969
Gypsy Girl/All I Can (Deram DM 278) 1969
Pyramid/Crash Landing (Island WIP 6091) 1971
Rockford Files/I Don't Know (CBS 3721) 1975



 01.Toyland (2:36)

02.Magic Handkerchief (3:20)

 03.Mutiny (3:06)

04.Little Lesley (2:14)

05.All Along The Watchtower (3:11)

 06.Sally Green (3:21)

 07.Penny For Your Throughts (3:42)

 08.Story Book (3:17)

09.Technicolour Dream (2:57)

10.We Can Help You (2:30)

 11.Love Is A Beautiful Thing (3:36)

 12.Violin Shop (3:04)

 13.You're Not In My Class (3:36)

 14.My Girl The Month Of May (2:44)

15.Technicolour Dream (single version) (2:57)

16.Toyland (single version) (2:54)

The Bruthers - Bad Way To Go (1966)

 REPOST

The Bruthers only released one single, "Bad Way to Go"/"Bad Love," in 1966. But the A-side eventually became one of the most highly regarded mid-'60s garage band obscurities after its reissue on Pebbles, Vol. 8. It was also one of the rawest garage band tracks to gain release on a major label (RCA), its furiously fast, shifting rhythms, berserk circular guitar and organ riffs, and malicious put-down lyrics bringing to mind something like a garage band at a harem.

Although the Bruthers did do some more recording in a similarly tightly coiled, slightly unhinged manner for RCA, the label didn't issue anything else before dropping them, although a few unreleased RCA outtakes would eventually surface on a Bruthers CD compilation.The Bruthers were actually real brothers: Alf Delia (who wrote most of the original material they recorded, including "Bad Way to Go"), Frank Delia, Mike Delia, and Joe Delia. The Pearl River, New York quartet had started performing in the early 1960s, and by the mid-'60s hooked up with manager Sid Bernstein, who also handled the Young Rascals and the Blues Project (as well as promoting mid-'60s New York City concerts for the Beatles). The single made no commercial impact, depending upon revival from garage collectors to reach a bigger audience, starting with its inclusion in the Pebbles series, and culminating with a full CD on Sundazed in 2003 that matched both sides of the single with RCA outtakes and some demos from 1965 and 1967. After the Bruthers broke up in 1967, keyboardist Joe Delia went on to play as a sideman for numerous acts, playing and arranging David Johansen's 1987 hit "Hot Hot Hot," and scoring many feature films, documentaries, and TV series. Guitarist Frank Delia eventually directed videos for the Ramones, Wall of Voodoo, and Jefferson Starship, as well as some episodes for television series.

1. The Brothers - Bad Way To Go (2:55)

2. The Brothers - Bad Love (2:17)

3. The Brothers - The Courtship Of Repunzel (2:49)

4. The Brothers - Don't Forget To Cry (2:52)

5. The Brothers - Just Had To Laugh (2:05)

6. The Brothers - I Wanna Be Your Man (2:33)

7. The Brothers - Walk Out In The Sun (2:42)

8. The Brothers - My Generation (2:17)

9. The Brothers - I'm Gonna Be Alone (2:41)

10. The Brothers - Wake Me, Shake Me (3:05)

11. The Brothers - The Courtship Of Repunzel (In (2:58)
 
Considering the Bruthers released just one single, it took some digging to manufacture an entire album of material from their brief legacy. Sundazed, as usual, was up to the task, compiling the 11-track Bad Way to Go CD, all but two of the songs coming from previously unreleased studio recordings. Both sides of their sole 1966 45, "Bad Way to Go"/"Bad Love," are here of course, and "Bad Way to Go" is certainly the best of the bunch. Its tense, almost circus-like up-and-down riffs, archetypically snarling mid-'60s garage vocal, doom-clouded organ, and furious tempo changes make it one of the best '60s garage records to have escaped inclusion on the Nuggets box set. The previously unreleased "The Courtship of Rapunzel," recorded just a couple of months later, had a similarly manic-aggressive feel, though perhaps its roller coaster riffs were a little too similar to "Bad Way to Go" to raise it to the same level. A few more Alf Delia originals here are enjoyable teen outrage in the same herky-jerkyish style, the 1965 demo "I'm Gonna Be Alone" betraying a melodramatic pre-Beatles influence along the lines of Del Shannon, and the folk-rock-influenced late-1966 outtake "Walk in the Sun" offering evidence of possible growth into a more mature sound. But the brief set's diluted by some typically energetic-but-derivative garage covers (of the Beatles' "I Wanna Be Your Man," the Who's "My Generation," and the Blues Project's "Wake Me, Shake Me"), as well as an instrumental version of "The Courtship of Rapunzel." ~~~ by Richie Unterberger

Barry Ryan - The Singles


1. Eloise (5:44)

2. Love Is Love (4:54)

3. My Mama (3:53)

4. The Colour Of My Love (2:49)

5. The Hunt (3:02)

6. Magical Spiel (3:55)

7. Kitsch (4:20)

8. Give Me A Sign (3:05)

9. We Did It Together (3:04)

10. Today (2:43)

11. It Is Written (3:45)

12. Red Man (3:24)

13. Canґt Let You Go (3:00)

14. Zeit macht nur vor dem Teufel (2:49)

15. Sanctus Sanctus Hallelujah (4:26)

16. Iґm Sorry Susan (2:30)

17. Donґt Bring Me Your Heartaches (2:44)

18. Have Pity On The Boy (2:36)

19. I Love Her (2:30)

20. I Love How You Love Me (2:50)

21. Have You Ever Loved Somebody (2:52)

22. Missy Missy (2:41)

23. Keep It Out Of Sight (2:48)

24. Claire (2:13)

Friday, September 24, 2010

Barry Ryan - Love Is Love


The son of pop singer Marion Ryan, Ryan and his twin brother Paul began to perform at the age of 16. In 1965 they signed a recording contract with Decca and, under the name of "Paul & Barry Ryan", brought out singles such as "Don't Bring Me Your Heartaches" (1965), "Have Pity on the Boy" (1966) and "Missy Missy" (1966)
When it turned out that Barry's brother, allegedly on the verge of a nervous breakdown, was unable to cope any longer with all the stress connected with show business, the two brothers decided on a new division of labour: Paul would write the songs which Barry would then interpret as a solo artist. Their greatest success as a composer-singer duo, now for MGM Records, was "Eloise" (1968), melodramatic and heavily orchestrated. Later singles included "Love Is Love" (also 1968), "The Hunt" (1969), "Magical Spiel" (1970), and "Kitsch" (1970).

"Love Is Love", written by Barry himself, and released in the United Kingdom during February 1969 was not a great success in his own country. However combining sales from Germany, Austria and the Netherlands, "Love is Love" sold a million copies by August 1969, the second million-seller for Ryan.



Ryan was also very popular in Germany. Promoted by BRAVO, the German youth magazine, Ryan also recorded a number of songs in German, for example "Die Zeit macht nur vor dem Teufel halt" ("Time Only Stops at The Devil").

Ryan stopped performing in the early 1970s. There were rumours that Ryan had had an accident in the recording studio. Supposedly he suffered serious burn wounds in the face and could no longer appear in public. However, he made a comeback in the late 1990s when a two CD set with his, and his brother's, old songs was published. Ryan was also part of the 'Solid Silver 60s Tour' of the UK in 2003, singing "Eloise" backed by The Dakotas.
.

Barry Ryan - Love Is Love (Hit History )

01 - Eloise

02 - Sanctus, Sanctus Hallelujah
03 - Loneliest Night of the Year
04 - Magical Spiel
05 - It is written
06 - The Hunt
07 - Love is Love
08 - Who puts the lights out
09 - Give me a sign
10 - Its a wild world
11 - i'm sorry Susan
12 - We did it together
13 - Can't let you go
14 - Today
15 - The color of my love
16 - Kitsch
17 - Goodbye ( Spectrum 554 117 )  1968
18 - Zeit macht nur vor dem Teufel halt ( Polydor 2001 207 )  1971


Bee Gees - This Is Where I Came In (2001)



Every time the brothers Gibb make another LP, the word is that they are going to return to the brilliant, crystalline pop with which they began in 1962-1972. It does make for a tasty proposition: Masters of early-'60s Merseybeat and late-'60s psych-pop, the Aussie teen sensations returned to their native England and wrote and recorded 12 indelible rock/pop hits from 1967-1972, all with fantastic three-part harmonies, as well as seven inspired LPs. So when one notes this album's title and the cover photo of the Bee Gees as teens, it's clear what the Gibbs intend, but they come up woefully short. Probably the best LP they've given in three decades, since Trafalgar and To Whom It May Concern, but that still says so pitifully little.


 It's shot down by '90s/'00s overproduction and Barry Gibb's penchant for oversinging; even when he writes a whimsical little "When I'm 64"/"Honey Pie" dance-hall pop tune such as "Technicolor Dreams," he still can't stop himself from trilling with all that bogus, phony air, where once he nailed such material with his natural voice. Worse, the LP is sabotaged by limpid, edge-less, polite production, so sanitized and squishy and mushy it's like aural wallpaper. The guitars have no bang, the keyboards are facile, the drums too mechanical, the bass too relegated to the background. In short, it's so over-stylized, there's no longer any there there. This is too bad, because their old songwriting knack isn't entirely absent. There's no "World," "Lemons Never Forget," or "Please Read Me," but the highlight title track racked up some deserved adult contemporary play (and some great, vintage singing from Robin Gibb), and the verses of "She Keeps on Coming" and "Walking on Air," and the choruses and bridges of "Wedding Day" and "Man in the Middle" are fine -- showing that with less sappy production, less overdramatizing, and/or a younger, grittier backing band, these three nice men might have been justly hailed again for something more than being has-been heritage artists. They can still sing instinctive harmonies like few others, and they can still write, but this is just another bad Bee Gees record.

01 - This Is Where I Came In
02 - She Keeps on Coming
03 - Sacred Trust
04 - Wedding Day
05 - Man in the Middle
06 - D?©j?  Vu
07 - Technicolor Dreams
08 - Walking on Air
09 - Loose Talk Costs Lives
10 - Embrace
11 - The Extra Mile

Bobby & Laurie - Bobby & Laurie (Go!!) & Hitch Hiker (1965-66)


Sort of a mishmash of the Beatles, Peter & Gordon, and the Everly Brothers, Bobby & Laurie were one of Australia's first and best responses to the British Invasion. Comprised of Bobby Bright and Laurie Allan (who were both guys), they released no less than eight singles and three albums in Australia in 1965 and 1966. Writing much of their own material, they were quite popular in their day down under, although they made no impact whatsoever on the international scene. Featuring close harmonies in the Beatles' style, they were actually one of the better British Invasion-inspired acts, outclassing many U.K. groups following in the Fab Four's footsteps. Leaning toward the tougher rather than the wimpier side of Merseybeat, they also roamed fairly far afield for their cover material, choosing relatively obscure U.S. R&B numbers and British beat B-sides and flops. They pursued an increasingly country & western-oriented direction before splitting at the end of 1966.
At this time, Bobby & Laurie started working with a Blackmore-managed backing band The Rondells (previously called The Lincolns and The Silhouettes). The duo reached their peak in late 1964, busily touring the country and appearing in numerous concert and television performances. They had dozens of engagements and personal appearances every week, with as many as six shows on a Saturday night. One unusual performance was playing 'Tweedledum' and 'Tweedledee' in a Christmas pantomime production of Alice In Wonderland at the Tivoli Theatre in Melbourne in December 1964.

In early 1965 the pair appeared on the Teen Scene music television show on the ABC, where they were famously dragged off the stage by screaming female fans. They appeared in the premiere episode of Channel 0's new children's program the Magic Circle Club on 23 January, playing characters 'Twoddle' and 'Boddle'.

They released three more successful singles on the Go label during 1965: Someone (which reached #3 in Melbourne), Judy Green and Crazy Country Hop which reached #25.

In May 1965 they supported a national tour by The Dave Clark Five, The Seekers and Tommy Quickly. Later in the year they supported American P. J. Proby on his national tour.

In 1966 they switched to the Albert Productions label, releasing Sweet And Tender Romance and Hitch Hiker, which gave them a national number-one hit for five weeks in May and June. At about this time they also changed management from Blackmore to Mal Fisher. On the strength of Hitch Hiker, the ABC gave them their own television show, It's A Gas, which was later rebadged as Dig We Must. The name change was designed to attract a more sophisticated 'adult' market, but lost the duo much of their 'teen' appeal which led to friction between the two singers.
After recording their last album Exposaic, the pair officially split in early 1967 after just three years as Australia's chart-topping stars. ~ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_%26_Laurie

References:




The Paupers - Ellis Island (1968)


Formed 1965 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
The Paupers were originally formed as the Spats in 1965 by lead guitarist Chuck Beale, bassist Denny Gerrard, guitarist Bill Misener and vocalist Skip Prokop. In 1966, Adam Mitchell replaced Misener and in 1968 bassist Brad Cambell joined the band after Gerrard departed. After two albums recorded in the late '60s, Magic People and Ellis Island, the Paupers broke up in 1969. Adam Mitchell went on to release a solo record in 1979, Redhead in Trouble, for Warner Bros..


Ronn 'Skip' Prokop (drums)
Denny Gerrard (bass)
Bill Marion [aka Bill Misener] (guitar)
Adam Mitchell (guitar; replaced Misener)
Chuck Beal (lead guitar)
Brad Campbell (bass; replaced Gerrard and was replaced by Gerrard)
Mel O'Brien (replaced Gerrard)
John Orde (keyboards)
Roz Park (drums; replaced Prokop)
Wally Cameron (drums; replaced Park)
Peter Sterback (organ; replaced Orde)
James Houston (drums; replaced Prokop)
Bill King (drums; replaced Park)


***

Following the tepid response to their 1967 debut LP Magic People, and the near-mythical meltdown at the Monterrey Pop Festival that followed it, the Paupers went back to Toronto to regroup. Essentially broke, travel-weary, and on the verge of break-up - bassist Denny Gerrard was given the boot for his constant drug use and errant absenteeism, and co-leader Skip Prokop even considered bailing - the band played an impressive set at CNE Stadium in support of the Soft Machine and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. After shelving three tracks cut in Nashville, the lads headed to New York in early May to record that "difficult second album" as it were, with producer Elliot Mazer bringing in Al Kooper on keyboards for the sessions.


The result, despite the former Blood Sweat and Tears member's best efforts, was an unfocused, patchy affair that lacked the occasional brilliance of their first. The menacing acid guitar of opener 'Southdown Road' seems to portend great things to come, but from there Ellis Island fragments into a bit of an incoherent mess. The choice of Adam Mitchell's folksy ballad 'Cairo Hotel' as the single is baffling to say the least. Ditto for the inclusion of flimsy ballads like 'Another Man's Hair on My Razor' and the country-tinged 'Can't Go On'. Still, when the Paupers choose to rock, as on the aforementioned lead-off track and the frighteningly electric 'Numbers', the results are occasionally gripping, if not exactly stellar. But pair that with the cheesy AM-fare of 'Juliana' and the lethargic 'Ask Her Again', where drummer Prokop curiously plucks the Japanese koto (a gift from Peter, Paul and Mary after a tour of Japan), and it is easy to see how Ellis Island would ultimately sound the band’s death knell.

Prokop left soon after, while guitarists Mitchell and Chuck Beal, saddled with $40,000 in debts, dutifully carried on for a year or so before jumping ship themselves. As for the talented Prokop, he would emerge the following year stronger than ever, later leading his soul-brass behemoth Lighthouse into the charts on both sides of the border with the likes of 'One Fine Morning' and 'Sunny Days' ~ http://www.canuckistanmusic.com/index.php?maid=178

1. The Paupers - South Down Road (8:21)

2. The Paupers - Cairo Hotel (4:07)

3. The Paupers - Cant Go On (3:29)

4. The Paupers - Another Mans Hair On My Razor (4:03)

5. The Paupers - Numbers (5:28)

6. The Paupers - Oh That She Might (4:47)

7. The Paupers - Yes I Know (6:07)

8. The Paupers - Ask Her Again (4:13)

9. The Paupers - Julliana (2:36)
 
llis Island, the second album by the Paupers, contains a front cover color photo of the four bandmembers inserted on a Sgt. Pepper-style collage by Ollie Alpert. Inside the LP is a very psychedelic black-and-white picture of the group, which also features 16 single photos of Cambell, Mitchell, Prokop, and Beale -- photos which you can cut out to make a flick book. Like a trendy flicker ring with more sustain, you can see the musicians move in the optical illusion if you follow the instructions. Problem with this concept was that there was no Andy Warhol to splash his name on the cover and get the idea some attention à la the famous banana cover. If Verve had difficulty understanding the Mothers of Invention and the Velvet Underground, where the Paupers fit in was anybody's guess. Adam Mitchell takes seven of the nine lead vocals as the band touches on a variety of psychedelic styles, beginning with "South Down Road." This opening track plays like Procol Harum battling the Electric Prunes -- it's eight and a half minutes of acid blues on an interesting album by an interesting crew. Mitchell's originals, four co-written with Skip Prokop, are an odd bunch. It seems Procol Harum won the war on the first song because "Cairo Hotel" sounds like they've now taken on Kaleidoscope U.K. in a battle of the bands. The intellectual display quickly disappears when the country comedy of "Another Man's Hair on My Razor" brings side one to a close. OK, it's amusing, but despite all the Sgt. Pepper trappings, there's no "Lucy in the Sky" in these grooves. Al Kooper guest stars on keyboards, and maybe they should have taken his "This Diamond Ring" and jumped the gun on Frijid Pink by reinventing that pop classic with a wall of distortion. Side two's opener, "Numbers," could be "Eight Miles High" meets Simon & Garfunkel's "Fakin' It." "Numbers," with its Strawberry Alarm Clock guitars and Janis Joplin bassist-to-be Brad Campbell singing lead, is jarring, but that's the rule on this album. Campbell would go on to track I Got Dem Ol' Kozmic Blues Again Mama! and Pearl with Joplin, as well as Joplin in Concert. That live album was collected and assembled by Elliot Mazer with some of the tracks recorded by Fred Catero, both men involved with the Paupers' Ellis Island project. Interesting to note the credible resumés involved in this esoteric project. Skip Prokop's one solo composition is also his one vocal. The man who would perform on Live Adventures of Al Kooper and Mike Bloomfield and create the band Lighthouse does an off-key Keith Moon-style vocal over a dreamy track, the Small Faces phase shifting meets...you guessed it...Procol Harum. This track is minus the fuzz guitars, instead employing the strings, piano, and effects, giving the listener some breathing room. Adam Mitchell takes the vocals back from here on out -- it's a dramatic "Yes I Know" written by Campbell, Prokop, and Mitchell, six minutes and 23 seconds of more psychedelic blues. This music would've been a blessing for the latter-day Blues Magoos and Electric Prunes, groups who moved away from these types of sounds, much to the chagrin of their fans. Without the hit singles those groups enjoyed, the Paupers' Ellis Island never got the attention it kind of deserved. It is both vintage and obscure, which could make it quite collectable at some point in time.~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

The Ugly Ducklings - Somewhere Outside (1967)



Along with the Haunted, the Ugly Ducklings were probably the best Canadian rock group of the mid-'60s. Like the Haunted, they drew heavily from the Rolling Stones -- as well as bits of the Kinks and Pretty Things -- for their raunchy R&B/rock sound, but had the edge over the Haunted in that they wrote stronger original material. Scoring a national hit with "Nothin'," the Toronto band recorded an album in 1966 and a few singles in 1966 and 1967, perhaps gaining their greatest international exposure when their "Just In Case You're Wondering" made it onto one of the Pebbles compilations.

Nineteen sixty-six was the year pop's voice cracked, when its squeaky clean Beatles complexion broke out in the pimply scruff of garage rock all over North America. From the Chocolate Watchband out in San Jose and the 13th Floor Elevators in Texas to the Unrelated Segments in Detroit and the Remains in Boston, a plethora of scrawny kids fumbled with chords on their used Telecasters while aping Mick's already affected snarls. Canada had its share of garage/psych bands whose discs now orbit the stratosphere in collectors' values. And whereas Montreal's the Haunted can lay claim to both the coolest single (the local smash '1-2-5') and the priciest vinyl (four figures for their 1967 album), the Ugly Ducklings emerge as the better of the two, scoring hits on Toronto's legendary CHUM-AM radio station with their debut platter, 'Nothin', eventually reaching number 18 in 1966, and 'Gaslight', peaking even higher the following year.


The Duckies, surfing on the success of 'Nothin', even opened for the Rolling Stones at (Toronto's hockey shrine) Maple Leaf Gardens in front of 15,000, no doubt providing them with fodder for a lifetime of middle-age boasts on their local pub nights.

In 1965, however, the Ugly Ducklings were little more than a teenage Stones cover band with the cheeky monicker the Strolling Bones (for what its worth, perhaps a more apt name for Mick and crew these days), but a year later they had changed their names and begun penning their own songs. They struck both chords and pose well, especially with rhythm-guitarist Glynn Bell's blond mophead making him the spitting image of Brian Jones and no doubt upping his groupie cachet a few notches.

Released in early 1967 but containing the band's three 1966 singles, Somewhere Outside skirts the cusp of '66 r'n'b and '67 psychedelia. The LP opens with 'Nothin' and its prototypical garage riff, allegedly recorded on a two-track machine for $300 and pushed into regular rotation just a few weeks later by local deejays. Other tracks, such as the revved-up 'She Ain't No Use to Me' and the searing 'Just in Case You Wonder', their third single, capture on vinyl the hegemony of cool the Ducklings had over the Yorkville scene in Toronto at the time. Still other tracks, like the Rascalesque, harmonica-tinged 'Not for Long', add a quieter balance, while the closer 'Windy City (Noise at the North End)', an acid-blues rave-up, echoes Paul Butterfield's excursions of the same year.

The Ugly Ducklings regrouped in 1980 on the wave of punk to release the humdrum Pain is Alright on Razor records. An eponymous long-player (with a brutally unimaginative cover) that same year compiled the essential tracks on Somewhere Outside along with miscellaneous tracks and their final singles 'Gaslight' and 'Epilogue'. But it wasn't until 1998 that Unidisc mercifully reissued this sweetly remastered CD with its original artwork, front and back, as a low-price disc - no bonus tracks, no added filler - thus making skeets out of all those previous bootleg versions. ~  http://www.canuckistanmusic.com/index.php?maid=9

1. Ugly Ducklings - Nothin' (2:28)

2. Ugly Ducklings - Postman's Fancy (2:24)

3. Ugly Ducklings - Windy City (5:58)

4. Ugly Ducklings - Do What You Want (2:45)

5. Ugly Ducklings - She Ain't No Use To Me (3:03)

6. Ugly Ducklings - Just In Case You Wonder (2:28)

7. Ugly Ducklings - Not For Long (2:57)

8. Ugly Ducklings - I Ain't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore (3:00)

9. Ugly Ducklings - Mama Keep Your Big Mouth Shut (3:01)

10. Ugly Ducklings - 10:30 Train (2:29)

11. Ugly Ducklings - Just A Thought (2:41)
 
The Ugly Ducklings were probably the best known Canadian garage rock group of the mid-'60s. Formed in famed Toronto's Yorkville area in 1965, the band flourished in the many coffeehouses around the Yorkville district as a Rolling Stones cover band before becoming the Ugly Ducklings and attracting the attention of the local Yorkville Records label. The band recorded a single, Nothin', that became a Canadian hit and opened for the Rolling Stones in 1966 when the band played Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens. The band members were quickly becoming local heroes and in 1967 the album Somewhere Outside was released on the small independent Yorkville label. The album contained nine original compositions as well as two cover songs. The band drew heavily from the Rolling Stones, the Kinks, and the Pretty Things style with a raunchy R&B/rock sound. The album sold well in the Toronto area but due to lack of national distribution the band failed to break out across the rest of the country. It wasn't until many years later, after the band broke up, that the album became a collectors item and now original pressings of the Somewhere Outside on the Yorkville label fetch hundreds of dollars between collectors. The popularity of the album has lead to it being bootlegged in many European countries over the years but most versions suffer from poor sound. This legitimate reissue by Unidisc has been digitally mastered for superb sound quality and is available at a budget price complete with the original album graphics.~ by Keith Pettipas

V.A.- Brum Beat


1. The Senators - She's a Mod (2:10)

2. The Cescendos - Gandy Dancer (1:57)

3. The Snakes - Silvery Moon (2:33)

4. The Sinners - Sleepwalk (1:55)

5. Frankie Williams & The Highcards - The Lady is A Tramp (2:02)

6. The Fortunes - Cygnet Twitch (2:12)

7. Mark Stuart & The Crestas - St. Louis Blues (2:37)

8. The Grashoppers - In Love (2:17)

9. The Two Corvettes - Runaway Guitar (2:33)

10. The Solitares - Over You (2:51)

11. The Congressman - The Shuck (1:52)

12. Roy Everett & The Climbers - I Believe (2:36)

13. The Renegades - Hungarian Mod (2:12)

14. Cal Denning & The Cimmarons - Pretend (2:31)

15. The Strangers - What Away (2:44)

16. The Mountain Kings - You Left Me Alone (2:04)

17. Dave Lacey & The Corvettes - Clap Your Hands (2:02)

18. The Blue Stars - I Saw You Yesterday (2:23)

19. The Kaven Four - So Glad (2:15)

20. The Mountain Kings - Don't You Know (1:40)

21. The Kaven Four - Stop Your Crying Little Girl (2:04)

22. The Blue Stars - Your's Forever (1:47)

23. The Mountain Kings - There'll Be Times (2:28)

24. The Strangers - It's Not to Late (2:20)

25. 25 - The Blue Stars - School Day

26. 26 - The Kaven Four - I Want Too Dance

27. 27 - The Strangers - Bye Bye Johnnie

28. 28 - Dave Lacey & The The Corvettes - Unlicky Am i

29. 29 - The Strangers - Return To Mary

30. 30 - The Mountain Kings - Can't You See

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Thee Midniters - Greatest Hits (2003)


Indisputably the greatest Latino rock band of the '60s, Thee Midniters took their inspiration from both the British Invasion sound of the Rolling Stones and the more traditional R&B that they were weaned on in their native Los Angeles. Hugely popular in East Los Angeles, the group, featuring both guitars and horns, had a local hit (and a small national one) with their storming version of "Land of a Thousand Dances" in 1965.

Much of their repertoire featured driving, slightly punkish rock/R&B, yet lead singer Willie Garcia also had a heartbreaking delivery on slow and steamy ballads. In the manner of other local phenomenon's like the Rationals (from Detroit), they were equally talented at whipping up a storm with up-tempo numbers and offering smoldering romantic soul tunes. After a few albums and an interesting detour into social consciousness with the single "Chicano Power," the group split in the early '70s, though their legacy is felt in later popular L.A. Latino rock acts like Los Lobos.
01 - Land Of A Thousand Dances (2:27)

02 - Whittier Blvd. (2:31)

03 - That's All (3:09)

04 - Empty Heart (2:35)

05 - I Need Someone (3:04)

06 - Giving Up On Love (2:49)

07 - Sad Girl (2:53)

08 - Brother Where Are You (4:10)

09 - It'll Never Be Over For Me (3:24)

10 - Love Special Delivery (2:16)

11 - Are You Angry (2:16)

12 - Don't Go Away (2:49)

13 - Everybody Needs Somebody To Love (2:46)

14 - Dreaming Casually (3:07)

15 - Never Knew I Had It So Bad (2:36)

16 - Making Ends Meet (2:38)

17 - Welcome Home Darling (2:20)

18 - The Town I Live In (3:22)

19 - Jump, Jive And Harmonize (2:31)

20 - Chicano Power (2:59)
Before the release of this 2003 compilation, the absence of a Thee Midniters CD collection was one of the most egregious omissions in the catalog of 1960s rock on compact disc. This 20-track anthology happily rectifies that situation, including everything from the fine 14-song 1983 Rhino LP Best of Thee Midniters, and adding half a dozen other worthy selections.
All of the band's very best cuts are here, whether it's the soul covers ("Land of a Thousand Dances," "Sad Girl," "Giving Up on Love," "The Town I Live In," "It'll Never Be Over for Me"); raucous bluesy garage rock ("Whittier Blvd.," "Jump, Jive and Harmonize," "Love Special Delivery," "Empty Heart"); or tasty romantic soul-pop originals ("Dreaming Casually," "Making Ends Meet"). There are, too, a few songs that sample the unpredictable directions into which the group occasionally flew, like the ghostly cover of jazz singer Oscar Brown, Jr.'s "Brother Where Are You?" and the Latin jazz-rock fusion of "Chicano Power." Audio purists might regret that some surface noise can be heard as the music was mastered from the best vinyl sources possible, rather than the original tapes, but really the vinyl noise is very faint and not a significant hindrance. It's also too bad that enjoyable oddities-rarities from the Thee Midniters discography like the psychedelic "Breakfast on the Grass," the Spanish ballad "Tu Despedida," and the searing instrumental "Thee Midnite Feeling" didn't make the cut. But given a 20-track cutoff point, it's hard to argue with the selection on this worthy summary of one of the finest 1960s American rock bands never to have a big national hit. ~ Richie Unterberger




Reparata & The Delrons - Rock & Roll Revolution (1970)


For a group that never made the Top 40, and came along almost too late to exploit the sound they produced, Reparata & the Delrons have proved amazingly durable. Their album haunted used record bins for years, and 18 of their songs cut for World Artists (a label most closely associated with Chad & Jeremy) are available on CD.



Reparata & the Delrons were one of hundreds of girl groups that flourished in the early '60s, and actually had a higher profile than many of their rivals, achieved in their own time by their participation in a pair of Dick Clark national tours and, for years after, from the fact that they actually released a complete LP to accompany their one widely recognized hit, "Whenever a Teenager Cries." That album, Whenever a Teenager Cries, was a low-level collectable piece that was easily found in record store used bins (especially in the northeast) well into the '80s and, in contrast to most other original girl group LPs, only cost $15 to $20. Thus, for 20 years after that album's release, Reparata & the Delrons' music, easier to find and less expensive than, say, originals by the Crystals or Darlene Love, was frequently a first-purchase by lots of people getting into the girl group sound.

The group started out as a quartet in 1962 at St. Brendan's Catholic School in Brooklyn, NY, led by lead singer Mary Aiesen — the other originals were Regina Gallagher, Anne Fitzgerald, and Nanette Licari. By 1964, Mary Aiese, working under the name Reparata Aiese (the name came from a nun at the school, Sister Mary Reparata), had a new group consisting of Sheila Reillie, Kathy Romeo, and Carol Drobnicki. The quartet was singing at a high school dance when they were spotted by Bill and Steve Jerome, brothers and producers looking for new talent to record.

The Jerome brothers got the group — reduced to a trio when Kathy Romeo exited — a record deal with Laurie Records for one single. "Your Big Mistake" passed without notice in the summer of 1964. This was already rather late in the girl group era, and the trio found themselves competing with a tidal wave of British Invasion sounds for attention from DJs. The Jeromes next brought them to the World Artists label in Pittsburgh, PA in late 1964, and they cut a group of songs at their first session that included "Whenever a Teenager Cries."
That song, released in early 1965, became a local success, although it never ascended as high as the Top 50 on the national charts. It was an attractive song in a sort of sub-Angels manner, and got the trio a spot on Dick Clark's Caravan of Stars national tour. Meanwhile, World Artists tried a string of Reparata & the Delrons singles, of which "Tommy" was a modest hit, although their subsequent efforts, including "The Boy I Love," were failures. A complete LP, containing "Whenever a Teenager Cries" and covers of such British Invasion fare as "If I Fell" and "Do Wah Diddy Diddy," was also released in 1965.

By the second half of the year, the Jerome brothers were label-shopping again, and this time the trio ended up at RCA. By the time their debut single on that label was recorded, the group was down to a duo of Mary Aiese and Nanette Licari, Carol Drobnicki having exited rather than embark on another national tour with Dick Clark. Lorraine Mazzola came in to fill the third slot and the trio ultimately cut five singles for RCA over a two-year period, none of which charted, and in early 1967, the group jumped to Mala Records, a division of Bell Records.

The Dick Clark tours ensured that Reparata & the Delrons got seen and heard nationally, even when their records didn't chart. At the same time, the fact that they were based in New York gave the group reason to hope that they might recapture some of their early success and build on it.

Their fortunes picked up a bit late that year with the release of "Captain of Your Ship," the first single to feature Lorraine Mazzola singing lead. It just missed charting in America, but made number 15 in England in early 1968. After three hitless years in America, Reparata & the Delrons found themselves touring England. It was to be a momentary uptick in their success, however, for the group never had a follow-up hit in England. A year later, they were on the Kapp Records label, where they also went hitless for three single releases.
Mary Aiese elected to leave the group she'd founded after five years in the business, turning it and the name "Reparata" over to Lorraine Mazzola. She put together a new group of Delrons and began performing on the oldies circuit, which was becoming a major draw by the dawn of the '70s. In 1973, Mazzola did an album of oldies tunes in a classic girl group style that failed to sell, and Reparata & the Delrons were retired as a name late that year. In 1974, Mazzola re-emerged as a member of Lady Flash, the backup group behind Barry Manilow, and scored a hit a year later with "Street Singin.' Strangely enough, it was Mary Aiese who had the last word as Reparata, reassuming the name and scoring a minor hit in 1975 with her single "Shoes."


1. Reparata & The Delrons - Whenever A Teenager Cries (2:46)

2. Reparata & The Delrons - He's My Guy (1:54)

3. Reparata & The Delrons - Tommy (2:33)

4. Reparata & The Delrons - Angel baby (3:57)

5. Reparata & The Delrons - Do You Remember When (2:24)

6. Reparata & The Delrons - I Met Him On A Sunday (2:09)

7. Reparata & The Delrons - In My Diary (1:53)

8. Reparata & The Delrons - Do Wah Diddy Diddy (2:30)

9. Reparata & The Delrons - Be My Baby (2:28)

10. Reparata & The Delrons - Summer Thoughts (2:38)

11. Reparata & The Delrons - Who Do You Love (2:04)

12. Reparata & The Delrons - Please Love Me Forever (2:48)

13. Reparata & The Delrons - Maybe (2:54)

14. Reparata & The Delrons - He's The Greatest (1:52)

15. Reparata & The Delrons - Dedicated To The One I Love (2:51)

16. Reparata & The Delrons - A Song For All (3:15)

17. Reparata & The Delrons - Eddie My Love (3:12)

18. Reparata & The Delrons - Every Beat Of My Heart (1:56)

19. Reparata & The Delrons - Love For You And Me (3:42)

20. Reparata & The Delrons - Shoes (3:04)

21. Reparata & The Delrons - That's How It All Began (2:21)

22. Reparata & The Delrons - He's So Fine (2:01)

23. Reparata & The Delrons - Lollipop (2:05)

24. 24 - Reparata & The Delrons - If I Fell

25. 25 - Reparata & The Delrons - To Know Him Is To Love Him

26. 26 - Reparata & The Delrons - Mr. Lee

27. 27 - Reparata & The Delrons - I Have A Boyfriend

28. 28 - Reparata & The Delrons - The Loneliest Girl In Town

29. 29 - Reparata & The Delrons - Till

30. 30 - Reparata & The Delrons - Bye Bye Baby

The Phinx - Sometimes (1968)


Unknown 60s garage band, who were once believed to be the Gants in disguise.



As part of his tax-scam activities, the legendary 'crazy cajun' Huey P Meaux reached into his vast vault of Texas '60s recordings and came up with a bunch of demos (?) from an obscure Houston group. Once assumed to be the Gants under an alias, this does feature a Gants cover ("My Baby Don't Care") which is the most garage-sounding thing here, unless you count the amusing "I Feel A Whole Lot Better" with altered, simplified lyrics and a long section where the guitar-break apparently went AWOL. All over a neat slice of circa 1967 organ/guitar teenbeat, given a weird twist by the tax scam angle. None of the tracks can be found anywhere else, and have never been reissued. Mediocre pressing but clean-looking, with a slight warp which does not affect play ~ http://members.tripod.com/lysergia_2/RenaissanceFair/RenaissanceFair_cat.htm



1. The Phinx - you make me feel good (2:29)

2. The Phinx - it takes friends (2:36)

3. The Phinx - sometimes (2:23)

4. The Phinx - mama lou (2:34)

5. The Phinx - feel a whole lot better (2:13)

6. The Phinx - stormy weather (2:20)

7. The Phinx - my baby don't care (2:45)

8. The Phinx - never so right (2:35)

9. The Phinx - eve of destruction (2:16)

10. The Phinx - duke of earl (2:06)

Johnny & The Hurricanes - The Big Sound Of Johnny & The Hurricanes




One of the most distinctive instrumental groups of the '50s and '60s, Johnny & the Hurricanes produced the Top Ten hit "Red River Rock" and scored several other instrumental hits that mixed rock & roll with traditional melodies. Originally known as the Orbits, the group formed in Toledo, OH, in 1958 and was led by saxophonist Johnny Paris; other members included organist Paul Tesluk, guitarist Dave Yorko, bassist Lionel "Butch" Mattice, and drummer Tony Kaye.

 After a stint recording with rockabilly singer Mack Vickery, the group traveled to Detroit, hoping to become a backing band for up-and-coming singers. However, a pair of music promoters, Harry Balk and Irving Michanik, signed them as a group on their own, and they recorded their first single, "Crossfire," for the Twirl label in 1959. "Crossfire" went to number 23 and the group moved to the Warwick imprint for "Red River Rock," a rock & roll instrumental of the standard "Red River Valley" that peaked at number five. The Hurricanes responded to their success with more of the same, delivering "Reveille Rock," "Rockin' Goose," "Revival," and "Beatnik Fly" over the next year, touring extensively all the while. Eventually the pace — and lack of further hit singles — caught up with the group, and Johnny & the Hurricanes disbanded in 1965. Paris moved to Hamburg, started his own label, Atila, and in 1970 formed a new Hurricanes lineup that toured until November 2005, two weeks before Paris took ill and was hospitalized. He died on May 1, 2006, due to pneumonia and septic blood after a splenectomy.



1. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Beatnik Fly (Stereo) (2:10)

2. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Bye Bye Blackbird (Stereo) (2:11)

3. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Corn Porne (Stereo) (2:17)

4. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Like Rock (Stereo) (1:51)

5. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Mister Irving (Stereo) (2:20)

6. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Molly-O (Stereo) (2:22)

7. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Sheba (Stereo) (2:12)

8. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Teensville Tonight (Stereo) (2:01)

9. Johnny & The Hurricanes - The Kid (Stereo) (2:27)

10. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Tom's Tune (Stereo) (1:47)

11. Johnny & The Hurricanes - Traffic Jam (Stereo) (2:27)

12. Johnny & The Hurricanes - You Are My Sunshine (Stereo) (2:13)

The Guess Who - Shakin' All Over/Hey Ho! /It's Time (3 Classic Albums - 1 Great CD) 2003




Editorial Reviews by amazon.com

Product Description

Aside from the magical garage rock classic of "Shakin' All Over"(originally recorded by Johnny Kidd & The Pirates) by The Guess Who, the other thirty one gems that make up this wonderful new collection are probably being heard for the very first time by many of their fans. In 1965, when the first rudiments of this superstar act were just beginning to soar into the American and Canadian charts with the smash single "Shakin' All Over", three Canadian only released albums would follow over the next few years. Friday Music is proud to be issuing these fantastic three albums on one new compact disc for the first time anywhere for your listening pleasure.


Their debut album Shakin' All Over includes some of the finest musicianship to ever be recorded in their homeland of Canada. Other tracks like "I've Been Away" and "Like I Love You" make this first effort a memorable one. A very pleasing half hour of Canadian Rock 60's style that has stood the test of time. Even to this day, The Guess Who still perform the title track in concert.


Hey Ho (What You Do To Me) continues The Guess Who's sojourn with an almost English Invasion approach, which works extremely well on songs like the harmonica laden "I Should Have Realized" and Randy Bachman's stellar instrumental "Made In England." A nicely balanced album with a surprising rendition of Bruce Johnston's five star ballad "Don't Be Scared." Rescued from vinyl oblivion, Bachman's remastering job really shines on this second effort.

A real find in this collection is the Canadian garage band classic It's Time. This amazing third chapter from this superstar band also introduced the world to the great voice of Burton Cummings. Along with founders Randy Bachman on guitar, the ever talented Jim Kale on bass and jazz rock drum style of Gary Peterson, these four gentlemen delivered some of the finest tunes ever with tracks like "One Day", the bluesy "Clock On The Wall" and the chain gang rock of "Seven Long Days." Never released on vinyl in the States, this newly remastered version should make a lot of Guess Who fans rejoice.

Shakin' All Over / Hey Ho (What You Do To Me) / It's Time were three definitive rocking chapters in the legendary career of The Guess Who. These recordings reveal a snapshot in Canadian musical history, never to be repeated again by anyone, but to be emulated by many. Their music is played on every classic rock and oldies station in the world, and fortunately for all of us, they continue to thrill crowds with their shopping list of number ones from multi-platinum albums recorded over the years. Now, you have your own eighty minute concert to enjoy courtesy of The Guess Who. Play it loud!


SHAKIN' ALL OVER-1965
1. Guess Who - Shakin' all over (2:43)

2. Guess Who - Like I love you (1:59)

3. Guess Who - Till we kissed (where havo you been) (2:37)

4. Guess Who - Shy Guy (2:27)

5. Guess Who - Shot of Rhythm N' Blues (2:07)

6. Guess Who - I want you to love me (2:20)

7. Guess Who - I'd rather be alone (2:10)

8. Guess Who - I've been away (2:08)

9. Guess Who - Tuff E Nuff (2:33)

10. Guess Who - Turn around and walk away (2:30)

HEY-HO 1965

1. Guess Who - Hey Ho (2:09)

2. Guess Who - Don't be scared (2:12)

3. Guess Who - Goodnight Goodnight (2:30)

4. Guess Who - I should have realized (2:05)

5. Guess Who - Hurting each other (2:16)

6. Guess Who - Made in England (3:01)

7. Guess Who - I'll keep coming back (1:52)

8. Guess Who - Stop teasing me (2:35)

9. Guess Who - Could this be Love (2:08)

10. Guess Who - Theme from a Music Box (2:13)


IT'S TIME 1966
1. Guess Who - Alright (2:21)

2. Guess Who - One Day (2:01)

3. Guess Who - Gonna search (2:27)

4. Guess Who -  Guess I'll find a Place (2:24)

5. Hey Ho - And she's mine (2:40)

6. Guess Who -  As (2:23)

7. Guess Who - You know he did (2:03)

8. Guess Who - Baby Feelin' (2:00)

9. Guess Who - Clock on the Wall (3:01)

10. Guess Who - Don't act so bad (3:09)

11. Guess Who - Believe me (2:53)

12. Guess Who - Seven long Years (2:45)

Before the Guess Who became one of the top album rock acts of the '70s, they were a darn good British Invasion-influenced garage band. This set features the three records they made in the mid-'60s: Shakin' All Over, Hey Ho (What You Do to Me), and It's Time for the small Canadian label Quality. Most of the songs on the set are Beatles-inspired but not derivative. Chad Allan and Randy Bachman wrote strong melodies, and the band usually sounds inspired and full of verve. They would have been a fun band to see live, sure to have the kids on the dancefloor. Apart from the Beatles, the band jumps around, hitting all kinds of sounds like rockabilly ("Tuff E Nuff"), surf ("Made in England"), blue-eyed soul ("Hey Ho," "Hurting Each Other"), Motown ("Could This Be Love"), and pop balladry ("Turn Around and Walk Away"). Their version of "Shakin' All Over" is just as good as Johnny Kidd's original, by the way. The third album, It's Time, is the most successful as the band welcomed Burton Cummings into the band and toughened up their sound considerably, drawing more from garage rock than the British Invasion. Cummings' voice adds a new element of a commanding vocal presence on barnburning rockers like "Alright" and "Gonna Search" and moody ballads like "Seven Long Years" and "Clock on the Wall." Bachman wrote some great songs for the record too like the chiming folk-rocker "And She's Mine" and the wonderfully aching "One Day." This record alone makes the set worth purchasing for garage rock aficionados. That you can get all three records together makes it even better. It is a toss up between this and Sundazed's great Shakin' All Over collection. That one probably wins out due to the presence of two unreleased tracks and their fine cover of Buffalo Springfield's "Flying on the Ground Is Wrong." Still, you can't go wrong with either. ~ Tim Sendra, Rovi
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