Sunday, February 13, 2011

Dave Berry - Dave Berry & Singles Bonus Trucks (1964)


Briefly a big star in Britain in the mid-'60s, Dave Berry faced the same dilemma as several other British teen idols of the era: R&B was obviously nearest and dearest to his heart, but he needed to record blatantly pop material to make the hit parade. It was also obvious that Berry was in fact much more suited toward pop ballads than rough-and-tumble R&B, regardless of his personal preferences. At his peak, his output was divided between hard R&B/rockers and straight pop. Help from ace session players like Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones notwithstanding, his smooth voice was frankly ill-equipped to deliver the goods with anything close to the same panache as Mick Jagger or Eric Burdon on the bluesier items. He made a rather good go of it, on the other hand, with romantic pop/rock ballads, hitting the British Top Ten with "The Crying Game" (1964), Bobby Goldsboro's "Little Things" (1965), and the excruciatingly sentimental "Mama" (1966). "This Strange Effect," written by Ray Davies (though not released by the Kinks), was a huge European hit for him in 1965 as well. 

Berry's voice was not exactly teeming with character and he never made the slightest impression on the U.S. market, but the best of his material is quite pleasant period fare. He remains well regarded in his homeland, where the Sex Pistols unexpectedly covered his toughest track, "Don't Gimme No Lip Child." Even more unexpectedly, "The Crying Game" brought Berry's voice to his biggest international audience ever in 1992, when it was used as the theme song for one of the year's most successful films.




The New Tweedy Brothers - The New Tweedy Brothers (1968)



New Tweedy Brothers 
Portland, Oregon 
About 1965 -1968 






Steve Ekman ~ Lead Guitar, Vocals 
Dennis "Phang" Fagaly ~ Bass 
Danny Lackaff ~ Drums, Vocals 
Fred Lackaff ~ Rhythm Guitar, Vocals 
Dave McClure ~ Bass 



By the time the New Tweedy Brothers put out their only album in 1968, the group had been on the San Fran scene for several years, opening for the Grateful Dead, Them, the 13th Floor Elevators, and a slew of other big-name bands. Originally hailing from Portland, these Puddletowners could have easily risen to the top of the local rock heap, had it not been for ... well, why didn't the band make it? Who knows? The Brothers simply sank into obscurity and were absorbed by the Me Decade and the vast morass of time.

The Grateful DeadJerry GarciaJefferson AirplaneMoby GrapeJimi Hendrix
Fortunately, after being highly sought after in record collector circles for decades, The New Tweedy Bros! has been reissued, complete with a classy package that mimics the original multigatefold, acid-cube design. The record shows the variety of its time, with tracks that range from thumping electrified boogie to jangly folk rock, from Elizabethan chants to full-on, kaleidoscopic, psychedelic freakouts. While the work of other artists -- Canned Heat, the Byrds, Jerry Garcia, the Jefferson Airplane -- echoes throughout this disc, the New Tweedies had a distinctive feel that was individual, if not entirely original. The group's yearning, somewhat shaky vocals are part of what stands out, as well as its diverse repertoire and its ability to shift from one style to another. Of the New Tweedy crew's contemporaries, probably only Moby Grape could match the group for its stylistic range and offbeat songwriting.

In the wake of the commercialized canonization of '60s pop, it's commonplace to split the music between perfectionist pop (the Beach Boys, the Beatles) and druggie self-gratification (the Doors, Jimi Hendrix, etc.) As we gaze back through the gray shades of hindsight, it's easy to overlook the original psychedelic scene's genuine experimental growth and diversity. Occasionally, however, records like The New Tweedy Bros! reappear, offering a glimpse at the real creative excitement of the time. While the Tweedy Brothers' album has all the clunky charm of modern lo-fi recordings, it is undeniably a work of its era -- you can't help but smile when you hear it, both because of its stereotypical '60s motifs and because of those ideas' continued ability to enchant us, even across the digital divide of our cynical, post-everything era.





Gary Farr & The T-Bones (1966)


Gary Farr formed the T-Bones in Worthing, Sussex, in 1963. They started out as a raw R&B outfit who were very popular in the clubs and made an appearance on 'Ready Steady Go'. Their debut 45 was a cover of Howlin' Wolf's How Many More Times, which was backed by a raw cover of the R&B standard, I'm A Lover Not A Fighter. Their second 'A' side was a cover of Soloman Burke's Won't She Give Him (One More Chance), backed by another good R&B number, Hamish's Express Relief. After this Gary Farr went solo, although he used the T-Bones to back him on his initial recordings. 



Future Nice and Emerson, Lake and Palmer member Keith Emerson was briefly with the T-Bones en route to The V.I.P.'s. Lee Jackson, previously of Hedgehopper's Anonymous, was also later in The Nice. Andrew Steele also went on to The Herd and Doggerel Bank. 




Gary Farr was best known for his work with the T-Bones, beginning in the early '60s and extending well into the '80s. He was born to British heavyweight boxing champion Tommy Farr, and grew up with a love of folk and blues music. He began to play in pubs and clubs around Sussex, until he finally put the T-Bones together. The lineup changed continually, including a short stint from keyboardist Keith Emerson, and even scored the spot as the resident band at London's Crawdaddy Club after the Yardbirds left it. The band was a live sensation, but in its long existence it never quite broke out of the underground and eventually disbanded in the late '80s. ~ (Bradley Torreano, All Music Guide)
T-Bones : One of the many British R&B groups fighting for attention in 1964 and 1965, the T-Bones (not to be confused with the American group that had an instrumental hit in 1965 with "No Matter What Shape") were reared in the shadow of the Yardbirds, sharing their manager (Giorgio Gomelsky), taking over their residency at London's famed Marquee club, and confounding collectors when a picture of the Yardbirds appeared on a French T-Bones EP. A decent, energetic act, they lacked the interpretative vision of the Yardbirds and other major British bands on the R&B scene and, like so many of the era's groups, had virtually no songwriting acumen. Keith Emerson was briefly a member, and lead singer Gary Farr recorded some solo albums. Gomelsky licensed a lot of material by his former bands haphazardly all over the world, and the T-Bones were not spared, accounting for the availability of a lot of unissued material this extremely minor band recorded in the mid-'60s. ~ (Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide)
*******
1 Won't You Give Him One More Chance2.I'm A Lover Not A Fighter 3 Get The Money.(Incomplete Grab)4 Give All She's Got5 Don't Stop And Stare6 Dearest Darling7 Quit Teasing Me Baby8 I Feel Alright9 I'm Lonesome Red10 Jumback11 Indeed I Do12 Hamish's Express Relief13 How Many More Times14 Oh Baby, Baby15 CC Rider16 You Don't Love Me
Bonus tracks :
17 I'm Louisiana Red 17 I'm Louisiana Red 19 Won't You Give Him (One More Chance) 20 I'm A Lover Not A Fighter

Aum - Resurrection (1969)


Aum was a San Francisco-based blues-rock group that lasted from 1968 to 1970 and released only two albums. Members were Wayne Ceballos (guitar, piano), Kenneth Newell (bass), and Larry Martin (drums).



Dusty Springfield - 2 albums





Britain's greatest pop diva, Dusty Springfield was also the finest white soul singer of her era, a performer of remarkable emotional resonance whose body of work spans the decades and their attendant musical transformations with a consistency and purity unmatched by any of her contemporaries; though a camp icon of glamorous excess in her towering beehive hairdo and panda-eye black mascara, the sultry intimacy and heartbreaking urgency of Springfield's voice transcended image and fashion, embracing everything from lushly orchestrated pop to gritty R&B to disco with unparalleled sophistication and depth. She was born Mary O'Brien on April 16, 1939, and raised on an eclectic diet of classical music and jazz, coming to worship Peggy Lee; after completing her schooling she joined the Lana Sisters, a pop vocal trio which issued a few singles on Fontana before dissolving. In 1960, upon teaming with her brother Dion O' Brien and his friend Tim Feild in the folk trio the Springfields, O'Brien adopted the stage name Dusty Springfield; thanks to a series of hits including "Breakaway," "Bambino," and "Say I Won't Be There," the group was soon the U.K.'s best-selling act. 

After the Springfields cracked the U.S. Top 20 in 1962 with "Silver Threads and Golden Needles," the group traveled stateside to record in Nashville, where exposure to the emerging American girl-group and Motown sounds impacted Dusty so profoundly that in 1963 she left the Springfields at the peak of their fame to pursue a solo career. Her first single, "I Only Want to Be With You," boasted a dramatic sound and soulful melody worthy of a Phil Spector hit, and it quickly reached the British Top Five; it also fell just shy of the Top Ten in the U.S., where it became the first major record from a U.K. act other than the Beatles since the Fab Four's launch of the British Invasion. Her biggest American Top Ten hit, "Wishin' and Hopin'," was the first in a series of Springfield smashes from the pen of songwriters Burt Bacharach and Hal David; she would subsequently cover Bacharach/David classics including "Anyone Who Had a Heart" and "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself," surpassed only by Dionne Warwick as the finest interpreter of the duo's songs. 

Additionally charting with hits including "Stay Awhile" and "All Cried Out," by the end of 1964 Springfield was arguably the biggest solo act in British pop, winning the first of four consecutive Best Female Vocalist honors in NME; that same year, she also created a political furor after she was deported from South Africa for refusing to play in front of racially segregated audiences. Returning to England, in 1965 Springfield hosted the television special The Sound of Motown, a show widely credited with introducing the Sound of Young America to the their British counterparts, and continued racking up smashes like "Losing You," "Your Hurtin' Kinda Love," and "In the Middle of Nowhere"; in 1966, she scored her biggest international hit with the devastating ballad "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me," which topped the U.K. charts and reached the Top Five in the U.S. The soundalike "All I See Is You," another heart-wrenching evocation of unrequited love, soon reached the British Top Ten as well; it was followed, however, by the Bacharach/David-penned "The Look of Love," a bossa nova-inflected classic positively radiating with dreamlike sensuousness. 

By 1968, however, Springfield's commercial fortunes were on the decline -- in the wake of Sgt. Pepper and the Summer of Love, "girl singers" were now widely perceived as little more than fluff. In response, she signed to the American label Atlantic, traveling to Memphis to record with producers Jerry Wexler, Tom Dowd, and Arif Mardin; the resulting album, issued in early 1969 as Dusty in Memphis, remains her masterpiece, a perfect marriage of pop and soul stunning in its emotional complexity and earthy beauty. Although the classic single "Son of a Preacher Man" cracked the Top Ten on both sides of the pond, the album itself was nevertheless a commercial failure, as was its fine 1970 follow-up, A Brand New Me, recorded in Philadelphia with the input of the songwriting/production team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. After completing 1972's See All Her Faces, Springfield relocated from London to New York City, eventually settling in Los Angeles; there she signed to ABC/Dunhill and recorded 1973's Cameo, another critical success which like its predecessors made virtually no impact on the charts. 

A projected follow-up, Longings, was abandoned prior to its completion, and apart from singing backup on Anne Murray's Together album, Springfield spent the mid-'70s outside of music while battling substance abuse problems. She finally resurfaced in 1978 with the Roy Thomas Baker-produced It Begins Again, followed a year later by Living Without Your Love; both attracted little notice, although the non-album single "Baby Blue" was a minor British hit in 1979. Apart from a handful of soundtrack contributions, Springfield was silent until returning to London in 1982 to record White Heat, an album firmly grounded in the prevailing synth-pop sound of its times; again, despite good critical notices, a comeback failed to materialize. She would release just a handful of singles over the next few years, including the 1984 Spencer Davis duet "Private Number," the 1985 ballad "Sometimes Like Butterflies," and a 1987 collaboration with Richard Carpenter, "Something in Your Eyes," which became a minor success in the U.S.

Upon returning to California in 1987, Springfield was contacted to collaborate with techno-pop innovators the Pet Shop Boys on a duet titled "What Have I Done to Deserve This?" The single was a global blockbuster, peaking at number two in both the U.S. and the U.K., and it introduced her to a new generation of listeners; Pet Shop Boys Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe also agreed to produce a handful of tracks for 1990's Reputation, which became Springfield's best-selling new album since her '60s-era peak. The follow-up, 1995's country-influenced A Very Fine Love, was recorded in Nashville; during sessions for the album, she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and after months of radiation therapy the illness was believed to be in remission. By the summer of 1996, however, the cancer had returned, and on March 2, 1999, Springfield died at the age of 59; just ten days later, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

1965  - Ev'rything's Coming Up Dusty







1. Dusty Springfield - Won't Be Long (3:23)
2. Dusty Springfield - Oh No! Not My Baby (2:48)
3. Dusty Springfield - Long After Tonight Is Over (2:39)
4. Dusty Springfield - La Bamba (2:36)
5. Dusty Springfield - Who Can I Turn To? (When Nobody Needs Me) (3:25)
6. Dusty Springfield - Doodlin' (2:48)
7. Dusty Springfield - If It Don't Work Out (2:45)
8. Dusty Springfield - That's How Heartaches Are Made (2:46)
9. Dusty Springfield - It Was Easier To Hurt Him (2:45)
10. Dusty Springfield - I've Been Wrong Before (2:24)
11. Dusty Springfield - I Can't Hear You (2:28)
12. Dusty Springfield - I Had A Talk With My Man Last Night (2:56)
13. Dusty Springfield - Packin' Up (2:04)
14. Dusty Springfield - Live It Up (2:28)
15. Dusty Springfield - I Wanna Make You Happy (2:27)
16. Dusty Springfield - I Want Your Love Tonight (2:05)
17. Dusty Springfield - Now That You're My Baby (2:10)
18. Dusty Springfield - Guess Who? (2:34)
19. Dusty Springfield - If Wishes Could Be Kisses (2:55)
20. Dusty Springfield - Don't Say It Baby (2:25)
21. Dusty Springfield - Here She Comes (2:21)


1968  - Dusty ... Definitely


1. Dusty Springfield - Ain't No Sun Since You've Been Gone (2:46)
2. Dusty Springfield - Take Another Little Piece Of My Heart (2:36)
3. Dusty Springfield - Another Night (2:13)
4. Dusty Springfield - Mr Dream Merchant (3:04)
5. Dusty Springfield - I Can't Give Back The Love I Feel For You (2:32)
6. Dusty Springfield - Love Power (2:09)
7. Dusty Springfield - This Girl's In Love With You (3:37)
8. Dusty Springfield - I Only Wanna Laugh (3:06)
9. Dusty Springfield - Who (Will Take My Place) (3:04)
10. Dusty Springfield - Think It's Gonna Rain Today (3:14)
11. Dusty Springfield - Morning (Bom Dia) (2:46)
12. Dusty Springfield - Second Time Around (3:41)
13. Dusty Springfield - No Stranger Am I (Remix) (2:47)
14. Dusty Springfield - Meditation (Remix) (1:57)
15. Dusty Springfield - The Colour Of Your Eyes (Remix) (2:33)
16. Dusty Springfield - Spooky (2:44)

After Tea - National Disaster (1968) Netherlands


After Tea, from The Hague, was formed when keyboardist Hans van Eijck left the Tee-Set. He was joined by Ray Fenwick and Polle Eduard.
After Tea’s trademark was a poppy flower power sound.
Just after the band’s debut album “ National Disaster” was released van Eijck returned to the Tee-Set and Ray Fenwick returned to England to join the Spencer Davis group, replacing Steve Winwood. He was replaced by Ferry Lever.
Drummer Martin Hahe left the band and was replaced by Pierre van der Linden (later drummer of Focus) and later on by Ilja Gort.
The album “ National Disaster” was released in Germany as “ Bubblegum Beat Party”.
Keyboardist Uly Grun (ex-Boots) joined the band for the album “ Joint House Blues”. The sound moved towards progressive hard rock. The commercial success stopped from that moment and soon the band broke up.


Hans van Eijck (composer, keyboard, vocals), Martin Hage (drums), Polle Eduard (bass, guitar, vocals), Ray Fenwick (guitar, vocals), Ferry Lever (guitar, vocals), Ilja Gort (drums), Pierre van der Linden (drums), Uly Grьn (keyboards) 

1. After Tea - After Tea (3:02)
2. After Tea - Gotta Get You in My Garden Gir (2:52)
3. After Tea - A Lot to Do (2:03)
4. After Tea - Not Just a Flower in Your Hair (2:41)
5. After Tea - In the Land of the Bubblegum T (2:12)
6. After Tea - I'll Push You For An Answer (2:10)
7. After Tea - Don't Waste Your Love on Me (1:27)
8. After Tea - National Disaster (2:04)
9. After Tea - Long Ago (3:59)
10. After Tea - The Time Is Nigh (3:26)
11. After Tea - Play That Record (4:44)
12. After Tea - Been a Sad Day (2:52)
13. After Tea - It's Too Late (2:29)
14. After Tea - Lemon Coloured Honey Tree (3:49)
15. After Tea - Peruquine Thomas (2:04)
16. After Tea - A Little Bit Today (a Little B (3:48)

Angel Pavement - Maybe Tomorrow (1969)

Recorded in 1969 but unreleased at the time, the sole album by baroque harmony pop-psych group Angel Pavement finally emerged in vinyl-only format in 2003. This CD release adds a further eight tracks, including five superb West Coast-leaning demos recorded locally in 1967 before they came down south to London to release two singles, all four sides of which are included herein. A rare treat for lovers of Honeybus/Zombies-style late '60s British pop.



Anyone unfamiliar with Angel Pavement shouldn't feel too bad. After all, the band was hardly a household name in its heyday, and its peak of exposure consisted of a pair of failed singles at the very tail-end of the 1960s in England. But they were a seriously wonderful sunshine pop outfit from late 1960s, hailing from York, with a sound that was equal parts psychedelia and pop/rock in the best Hollies/Zombies/Beatles manner. The band, which took its name from a 1930 novel by J.B. Priestley (himself a Yorkshireman, natch), was assembled by guitarist/songwriter Alfie Shepherd out of the remnants of a soul-based outfit, Wesley Hardin's Shotgun Package, with Paul Smith (lead vocals), Dave Smith (guitar), Graham Harris (bass), and Alan Reeve (drums) (later replaced by Mike "Candy" Candler). They quickly developed an effective pop-oriented psychedelic sound, similar to what the Hollies were doing on Evolution and Butterfly, and the Zombies generated on Odessey & Oracle, with lush harmonies, glittering instrumental textures, horns and brass in the right places on the pop numbers. They managed to build a large following in their native York and also cut some early sides that heavily reflected all of those influences. 

The group's attempt to crack the London club scene coincided with their starting work on a debut album at Morgan Studios, but those efforts were interrupted by an offer to play a series of gigs for a few days in Mexico City in early 1969. Instead, they stayed for five months, and returned to London to pick up work on the album, a process interrupted by Dave Smith's departure (and his replacement by John Cartwright, who played guitar and trumpet). A pair of singles, "Baby You've Gotta Stay" and "Tell Me What I've Got to Do," issued through Fontana Records, failed to elicit any serious chart action in late 1969 and early 1970; a third single and their announcement of a forthcoming LP all ended up missing in action because of disputes between Shepherd and the studio's publishing arm. Their producer apparently put the final nail in the coffin, and they broke up at the end of 1970. Candler went on to join Decameron and the John Coppin and his band, and Shepherd wrote songs and attempted to do a musical adaptation of The Wind in the Willows, while the others exited the business altogether. In 2005, Wooden Hill Records issued Maybe Tomorrow, the first-ever release of nearly two-dozen songs from those long-ago Morgan sessions by Angel Pavement -- they lived up to all of the stories about the group's sound and potential. The 1969 Wind in the Willows project was finally released on CD in 2009, digitally remastered with extra demo songs, on the Wooden Hill label.

1. The Man In The Shop On The Corner
2. Maybe Tomorrow
3. Time Is Upon Us
4. Green Mello Hill
5. Little Old Man
6. When Will I See June Again
7. Genevieve
8. Water Woman
9. Napoleon
10. Socialising
11. Jennifer
12. Carrie
13. I'm A Dreamer
14. Baby You've Gotta Stay
15. I'm Moving On
16. Tell Me What I've Got To Do
17. Phantasmagoria
18. Rooftop Memories
19. Tootsy Wootsy Feelgood
20. Flying On The Ground (Is Wrong)
21. Five Sisters
22. Desperate Dan
23. I'm Moving On (early mix)

V.A - Got The Go!!! The Compil Vol. 1






1. 01. Kiki - C'est Parti Mon Kiki (2:19)
2. 02. The Mob - Give It To Me (2:42)
3. 03. The Love Kittens - Come In The Kitchen (2:35)
4. 04. Pussycat - Mais Pourquoi (2:25)
5. 05. Jean Dinardo & son groupe Les W - New times Rock (2:33)
6. 06. Egbert Douwe - Het Gerucht (3:10)
7. 07. Jack Ary - Les Tomates (2:40)
8. 08. Tom Jones - Venus (2:39)
9. 09. Antoine - Pop Corn (2:16)
10. 10. R.B. Hudman - Yo Yo (2:57)
11. 11. Gilles Brown - L'agent Secret (2:40)
12. 12. Dave Clark Five - Concentration Baby (2:30)
13. 13. Pilade - Il Re d'Inghilterra (2:02)
14. 14. Perez Prado - Oups! Don't Remember (2:04)
15. 15. Miguel Cordoba - Oye (2:44)
16. 16. Jose Salcy - Je Bois Trop (3:20)
17. 17. Mike Evans - Gruesome (2:33)
18. 18. Les Transports Marceau - Le blues Du Transporteur (2:26)



VA- C'est Chic! French Girl Singers Of The 60s (1960s) France




Larisa Mondrus - Dlja teh, kto zhdet (earlier years) USSR


REQUEST

Первую эстрадную песню, принесшую известность Раймонду, спела именно Лариса Мондрус. Это был "Синий лен". 
Лари́са Изра́илевна Мо́ндрус (латыш. Larisa Mondrusa, род. 15 ноября 1943, Джамбул, Казахстан) — советская певица и актриса. Звезда эстрады и телевидения СССР в 1960-е годы.

Oкончила Рижское музыкальное училище.
В 1962 году вчерашняя школьница прошла по конкурсу в Рижский эстрадный оркестр и сразу же обратила на себя внимание публики.
В 1964 году Лариса Мондрус приезжает в Москву, и с этого момента начинается новый этап в творчестве молодой певицы. Работа в оркестре Эдди Рознера. В содружестве с инструментальным ансамблем под руководством Эгила Шварца создаются записи новых песен, в которых ярко проявляется ее талант. В 1968 снималась в музыкальной комедии "УЛЫБНИСЬ СОСЕДУ".
Лариса Мондрус много гастролирует, постоянно ищет новые песни. Но одно дело - выучить песню и исполнить ее в концерте, другое дело песню создать. Этот путь связан с поисками, сомнениями, радостью открытия, с подлинным творчеством. Таким путем идет в своем творчестве Лариса Мондрус. Не случайно многие композиторы и поэты доверяют ей первое исполнение своих произведений.
Первую эстрадную песню, принесшую известность Раймонду, спела именно Лариса Мондрус. Это был "Синий лен".
Лариса замужем за бывшим одноклассником Р.Паулса Эгилом Шварцем джазовым музыкантом, аранжировщиком и дирижером, возглавлявшем до Паулса Рижский Эстрадный Оркестр. И всё складывалось у них удачно пока Лариса с мужем не захотели покинуть страну. Официальная пропаганда развернула против несчастной певицы кампанию травли. Маму певицы исключили из КПСС. В Государственных фонотеках записи Мондрус были изяты из обращения, пластинки изъяты из продажи и уничтожены. Но с 1973 года Лариса и Эгил живут в Мюнхене.
Вхождение в западный мир шоу бизнеса началось для Ларисы с поиска телефонов Баварского радио в справочнике из телефонной будки. Потом была успешная запись для радио песни "Бесконечное объяснение" Ю.Саульскoго, было первое выступление на телевидении в шоу Ивана Реброва.
С певицей работали профессионалы - писалась музыка, работали оркестры, делались записи на телевидении. После живого прослушивания на фирме грамзаписи Polydor Лариса получила пятилетний контракт.
Первая пластинка Ларисы Мондрус вышла в Германии на латышском языке - пришла популярность в немецкой и латышской аудитории.
В Германии родился сын, которого семья воспитала в немецкой культуре, хотя он знает и латышский и русский язык. Сегодня он серьезно занимается классической музыкой и очень радует маму своими успехами. Кроме музыки у Ларисы есть свое дело - с 1985 она держит два магазина итальянской обуви и очень профессионально к этому относится.
В начале 90-х певица, гастролировала в Риге, встречалась с Раймондом Вольдемаровичем. Летом 2001 Лариса Мондрус впервые за 28 лет посетила Москву. Телевизионные передачи, радио-эфир, выступление на юбилее П.М.Шаболтая (Ген.директор КДС, бывший ген.директор ГЦКЗ Россия).
В 2001 писатель Борис Савченко (автор книги о Вадиме Козине) приезжал к Ларисе в Мюнхен и работал с ней над книгой "Две жизни Ларисы Мондрус", книга должна расказать обо всех прожитых годах и о судьбе певицы в Западной Германии. 



http://bearsandvodka.com/2010/04/larisa-mondrus/


http://www.chas-daily.com/win/2004/07/23/g_054.html?r=33&printer=1&



1. Larisa Mondrus - Sinij len (3:03)
2. Larisa Mondrus - Svet u tebja v okne (4:43)
3. Larisa Mondrus - Nas zvezdy zhdut (2:47)
4. Larisa Mondrus - Neuzheli jeto mne odnoj (4:25)
5. Larisa Mondrus - Snezhinka (2:24)
6. Larisa Mondrus - Ja devchonka (2:12)
7. Larisa Mondrus - Razgovor ptic (3:06)
8. Larisa Mondrus - Solnechnaja ballada (1967) (4:02)
9. Larisa Mondrus - Chudo - jeto ty (3:23)
10. Larisa Mondrus - Ryzhij paren' (2:34)
11. Larisa Mondrus - Ty pogodi (3:08)
12. Larisa Mondrus - Otkrovennaja pesnja (3:44)
13. Larisa Mondrus - Jumoreska (1:54)
14. Larisa Mondrus - Mozhet, net, a mozhet da (2:23)
15. Larisa Mondrus - Lunnyj svet (2:55)
16. Larisa Mondrus - Oblaka (3:42)
17. Larisa Mondrus - Belyj parohod (2:42)
18. Larisa Mondrus - Milyj moj fantazer (2:26)
19. Larisa Mondrus - Prosnis' i poj (2:30)
20. Larisa Mondrus - Ulybajsja (2:03)
21. Larisa Mondrus - Ozernyj kraj (3:35)
22. Larisa Mondrus - Listopad (4:05)
23. Larisa Mondrus - Tum-balalajka (3:13)
24. Larisa Mondrus - Chertovo koleso (3:30)
25. 25 - Prosnis' i poj (instrumental'naja versija)

Saturday, February 5, 2011

V.A. - Heimatliche Klaenge vol.52 Prae-Kraut Pandaemonium Vol.4


Prae-Kraut Pandaemonium Vol.4

1 Novak's Kapelle - Smile Please
2 The Guards - Hullabaloo
3 Antoine - Der Krieg
4 Cherry Stones - The Things She Says
5 Lord Knud - I'm Your Guy
6 Les Copains - Give Your Love To Me
7 The Newcomers - Have You Seen My Baby Coming
8 The Blizzards - I'm Your Guy
9 Die Meatles - Praeschdlingsaegger Fuer Emmer
10 The Dukes - The Dentist   
11 Charles Ryders Corporation - White Flames   
12 The Sorcerers - With You   
13 The Details - What Shall I Do   
14 The Sonics - Hitch Hike   
15 Ronald Patrick Guttridge - Schlagendes Herz   
16 The Slaves - Panic   
17 John Hamilton Band - Light-Winged Smoke   
18 The Ringleaders - This World Could Be A Beauty   



You're probably wondering why we're here again so soon. Well, we do too, but the reaction to Vol.1 & 2 was too overwhelming to stop now. Just a few copies left, and the reviews are yet to come. We're not alone in space! (Special thanks for support and encouragement to Hr: G:; Hr.V. & Hr. K., true comrades against the jive)
Proud owners of the first volumes will know, but here's to all you newcomers: Hands off if you're expecting a certain sound. This is not a psychedelic- not a garage- not a novelty- not a beat band- collection. It's all of that and more. Purism is not our thing and you'll need an open mind, a strange kind of humour and a strong stomach now and then. Digital brains be warned: We're rather flying low-fi than stand-by. The sound quality of the sources varies from brilliant to audible. So if you can't stand a little pot-rattling, get out of the kitchen and wait for the new Phil Collins CD-rom. Ready Krauts?



Novak's Kapelle
Their story can be found on Vol.1 & 2. "Smile Please" is the third (and probably last) guest appearance of our favourite lunatics. Another violent statement from Vienna's rude boys. "If You See A Policeman, Strike Him Down As Fast As You Can"! Get the picture? (Amadeo Rec.)

   

The Guards and The Sorcerers
were discovered on a compilation called "Yeah Yeah Beat" available on tape reel only on the Saba Label. We're still trying to find out who plays what, because they didn't coordinate the band names with the tracks. These are the two songs that were released on 45 as well on the label from the Black Forest. The Sorcerers' "With You" should have been a hit in the days of Beatlemania. The Guards' "Hullabaloo" is one of the weirdest case of troglodyte music we've ever heard, and it's a pitty there's not more of it. We'll keep searching.
(The Guards: seemingly a British band with a German-only release. "Hullabaloo" was a 7" on the Saba label)
(The Sorcerers were a British band with a German-only 7". Ace Kefford was a member.)



Antoine
First of all, please don't judge him by this little ditty. In his native tongue, he was a master of the word, singing songs about his father who thinks he's Fred Astaire, Beethoven's birthday and the un-probable existence of God. His three longplayers are among the best to come out of the continent yet. He was called the french answer to Bob Dylan. Actually he had more in common with the provo-movement from Amsterdam or the less political Gammler scene in Germany. His big hit was "Les Elucubrations d'Antoine". These illuminations of Antoine surprisingly made the charts here soon as the translation appeared in the teenie-mag "Bravo". He was stepping on everybody's toe, defending long hair and called Johnny Hallyday an asshole or something. Johnny, the tough greaser of Paris, broke Antoine's nose (he probably just announced to do so, but the press, you know...) and a hit with a song called "Long Hair, Short sense".
Anyway, for a while Antoine was popular enough to do what Johnny did years before, record some songs in german. "Der Krieg" (The War, dummy) is, alas, nothing to laugh your balls off for our out-lando friends, but what's so funny 'bout peace, love and understanding anyway, anyhow, anywhere these days!



The Cherry Stones
Their story is a short one. All we know is that their stone-fruit monolith on Jo May Productions is one of the most wanted among collectors of the Kraut. Cancel your summer holiday for a copy. The rancorous Garage Punk on the A-side needs no recommendation. The flip is a case of love it or leave it, and in fact not all of the members of the Anti-Oblivion-League had their thumbs up at first. A little ridiculous, but a daring attempt. What are they trying to do? Interbreeding Dylan with Caruso? Had a sleepless night 'till I found out where I've heard this one before. It's the flip of the very first Small Faces Single. Marriott & Co. took it from "Timi Yuro's Greatest Hits". What a long strange trip...



Lord Knud
Knud Kuntze was the bassplayer of a band famous for insisting on calling themselves "die The Lords". He played on "Poor Boy" and all the other early hits. Then he lost a leg in an accident (car crash, I guess). When they found out that he couldn't hold on to his crutches and his bass simultan-eously, he was fired. He did stumble, but didn't fall. Made this marvellous single, combining Mozart and McCartney. Sounds like a hit today, but wasn't then. He survived as a DJ. Scandal is too weak a word. Knud, we love you, whereever you are. Praise the Lord and Long John Silver.



Les Copains
Ashes on my head. In 1966 you could have picked this jewel out of every bargain bin at Woolworth's for Pfennigs. We didn't cause we thought they're french. (Rock'n Roll, kдs-koe-zдh?)
Not only are they not. "The Buddies" will pin you to the wall with the weirdest stuff ever released in this country. Try to record a song like "I'm So Lonely" in '94 and you'll end straight in the asylum. The Monks were ahead of their time. Their labelmates are still ignored. I've seen fire and brimstone coming down on my head. I did expect the Spanish Inquisition, but I didn't expect Les Copains.



The Newcomers
It's 27 years ago, Sergeant Pepper was their drill instructor, but they must have been at the Who's sell-out as well. Although on a majorlabel (sold to the island of the rising sun meanwhile), their brilliant singles didn't get the deserved support cread: airplay, and sank without a trace. The world would be a better place, if we had newcomers like this in the boring nineties.



The Blizzards
are another reason to go back to school. Their fate is probably the most tragic and undeserved of all those cases documented in this series. Like The Eyes or The Prophets in GB, they tried hard and went nowhere. But how great they were! They recorded in English and German. 7 singles and an LP. The first has been re-released on Star Club Complete Vol. 3 recently. (Not their strongest moment, but there you'll find a very detailed band history of Stade's finest). They were not Roy Black's backing band of the same name, but they did the job for another of the Schlager-Fuzzies. That's the reason why we're still searching for a single called "Lebenslдnglich" by Howard Carpendale. The Blizzards really let it all hang out when allowed. "Hab keine Lust heut' aufzustehen" means "You won't get me out of bed today" and is a perfect ode to idleness.


Die Meatles
from Metzingen! had a strong following among suebian youngsters and even a minor hit with a song that could be translated as "Ich wuensch mir zum Geburtstag einen Meatle". They began as The Three Magooses (Three MacGee after a little debate with their latin teacher) playing rough edged instrumentals like "Surfing Down The Achalm". Changed their name after recruiting a talented young busker right from the streets of Tьbingen. Wulle Dinkelacker was specialised in transforming Beatle-songs to his native tongue, a dialect that's hard to bear outside the incestuous backwoods they call home. They recorded a whole LP, "Beat The Meatles",intending to release it on their own "Sдppl-Records". On a couple of tracks, they made it a bit too easy on themselves, overdubbing Beatles instrumental tracks with their own voices in a kind of early Karaoke. When Odeon Records, the german Beatles-label, found out and -that probably did it- had the lyrics translated, they threatened to sue the Meatles who disbanded in anger. We have found the mastertapes and wait 'till you hear "I mechd de schneggsla uff d'r Gass", their 20 minutes version of "Why Don't We Do It In The Road".
(Die Meatles: An obvious fake. The story is crap! The song probably was recorded in the 80's.)



The Dukes
are responsible for three of the most deranged examples of german poetry. Their last effort, "Vera Petruschka" sucks a bit musically and might offend our russian friends. Noblesse oblige. "The Dentist" is a sincere support to the national health campaign in the best Dragons tradition (remember "Heart Transplantation"?). "I'm An Unskilled Worker" should be the international anthem of all us workshy freaks of the world. Unite and stay in bed! Keep smoking, grow gills. If only they had avoided adding Adolf Hitler to their gallery of famous unskilled workers. A doubtful joke even 30 years ago...(Alcora Rec.)



Charles Ryders Corporation
No, they definitely are not from Switzerland, but we're stretching the border a bit again nevertheless. Karli Ratzer is better known as the wizzard of the gipsy guitar now. He started as the 15 year old wunderkind of The Vienna Beatles in '65. He was a member of The (Vienna) Slaves and the axeman of the brilliant but short-lived C.R. Corporation. One of Austria's most respected Jazz musicians today.



The Details
File not found, no details known. What shall I do? Tell you, that this is the only single? (on that risky label again) That they're mixing Seeds and Zombies? Strange Brew. They don't need no hype, they're simply great.



The Sonics
Ha, lucky old me! I know some facts about The Sonics. They are not Mr. Roslie's monsters and their "Hitch-Hike" is not the marvin Gaye via Glimmer Twins number. And, here comes the twist, they're stampeding through this original just as wild and ruthless as their name-mates from Seattle, who (perfect confusion!) did indeed cover the Motown song. (Paletten)
(The Sonics: Another British band that recorded and released only in Germany.)


Ronald Patrick Guttridge
was a traveling salesman from England, bold enough to send a tape to the Ninth International Contest of soundhunters 1960 in Amsterdam. He won a prize for "Schlagendes Herz" (Beating Heart), on which he overdubbed drums and guitar with a Telefunken reel-to-reel 4-track tape machine. A german label released this wonderful Instrumental on an EP together with a couple of other amazing sound experiments. 34 years later, we're proud to give it back to the world. And, man, I'm glad we're able to present the cover of "Tцene gejagt und eingefangen" (Sounds hounted and captured).
Beat'n Heart. Was hier dem Englдnder Ronald Patrick Guttridge - er ist Vertreter von Beruf! - gelang, haette eine reelle Chance, ein Bestseller zu werden. Das technische Raffinement, mit dem er eine an sich simple Melodie auf der elektrischen Gitarre mit dem Schlagzeug und dem treibenden Rhytmus eines menschlichen Herzens versehen hat, erinnert schon sehr an die perfekte Aufnahmetechnik amerikanischer Hits. Der Amateur erreicht qualitativ die Professionellen.



The Slaves
Mixed up confusion. some say they came from Austria and, right, there was a band from Vienna with the same name (Karl Ratzer was a member). Some say Switzerland and, yes, most of them were slaves to the cheese. They had at least one german member (although he never was a "Rattle", Mr. Shaw...)
Slave drivers never mind where they recruit their victims. The Slaves were the hardest working band in the region of the Bodensee, a lake big enough to offer a shore to all the three countries in question. Quite likely they all can claim a fair share in the history of slavery. What a wonderful multicultural world.


The John Hamilton Band
Like The Spots, The Ravers, Automatic Blues Inc., Hell Preachers Inc. and a dozen more, The J.H.B. was a pseudonym for a couple of guys from the Hamburg area that could be hired by cheapo labels like Europa, Somerset, Tip or Sonic to record versions of the current Top 20. Most of these monikers are a disguise for the ever-present Tonics. Not in this case, because the non-existent John Hamilton seems to be ex-Rattle Herbert Hildebrandt. Among covers of CCR and T.Rex we've found "Light-Winged smoke" and by reading the title alone, we knew we'd like this one.



The Ringleaders
We had this corny little piece of crap on every track list from Vol. 1 to Vol.3 and skipped it. We're not willing to risk our mental health any longer. It's been haunting us since we put it on the short list.
Right, it's too silly to be true. As long as we only couldn't get that cheesy organ out of our heads... well, we're brave men. But soon as you catch yourself singing these demented "Lyrics!" like a mantra, it's time to get the monkey off your back. Your turn now.
The Ringleaders came from somewhere in Baden and we hope their name is inspired by the reading of Tolkien. If not, they'd be "Die Kreisleiter"

Dank an: Thomas G., Nini S., Pauki und Michael E.

V.A. - Heimatliche Klaenge vol.51 Prae-Kraut Pandaemonium Vol.3


Prae-Kraut Pandaemonium Vol.3

1 The Rebbels - Round The World
2 Fifth Dead - Devil King
3 The King-Beats - Hear What I Say
4 The Rocking Stars - Flames Of Love
5 The Magic Herbs - Still Hoping You Might Come Back Home
6 Daisy Clan - Glory Be
7 Cherry Stones - What's The Matter Baby
8 The Gents Inc. - Gettin' The Blues
9 unknown - Mystery Track
10 Les Copains - I'm So Lonely  
11 Chosen Few - One Day Before  
12 The Blizzards - Hab' Keine Lust Heut Aufzustehn   
13 The Loosers - Understand  
14 The Wild Cats - All Right  
15 The Kentuckys - Old Hangman Is Dead  
16 The Sevens - Love Of A Bird  
17 The Dukes - I'm An Unskilled Worker   
18 The J.P.'s - The War   




You're probably wondering why we're here again so soon. Well, we do too, but the reaction to Vol.1 & 2 was too overwhelming to stop now. Just a few copies left, and the reviews are yet to come. We're not alone in space! (Special thanks for support and encouragement to Hr: G:; Hr.V. & Hr. K., true comrades against the jive)
Proud owners of the first volumes will know, but here's to all you newcomers: Hands off if you're expecting a certain sound. This is not a psychedelic- not a garage- not a novelty- not a beat band- collection. It's all of that and more. Purism is not our thing and you'll need an open mind, a strange kind of humour and a strong stomach now and then. Digital brains be warned: We're rather flying low-fi than stand-by. The sound quality of the sources varies from brilliant to audible. So if you can't stand a little pot-rattling, get out of the kitchen and wait for the new Phil Collins CD-rom. Ready Krauts?

The Blizzards
are another reason to go back to school. Their fate is probably the most tragic and undeserved of all those cases documented in this series. Like The Eyes or The Prophets in GB, they tried hard and went nowhere. But how great they were! They recorded in english and german. 7 singles and an LP. The first has been re-released on Star Club Complete Vol. 3 recently. (Not their strongest moment, but there you'll find a very detailed band history of Stade's finest). They were not Roy Black's backing band of the same name, but they did the job for another of the Schlager-Fuzzies. That's the reason why we're still searching for a single called "Lebenslдnglich" by Howard Carpendale. The Blizzards really let it all hang out when allowed. "Hab keine Lust heut' aufzustehen" means "You won't get me out of bed today" and is a perfect ode to idleness.


Chosen Few
What about compiling a sampler containing all those Chosen Fews of the world. Even Germany can offer more than one of them, because this doesn't seem to be the group that recorded "Blackbird Face" on CCA. "One Day Before" (GM Rec.) is a real Krautpleaser, something to play to your music teacher and earn a patronizing "well, interesting indeed". Incredible violin solo some years ahead of "The Flock" and another flirt with Amadeus.


The Loosers
I'm a Looser, baby, so why don't you correct me? Like The Rebbels, they must have had a dictionary of questionable quality. Who cares, they had the nerve to put their money in this privately pressed 45. The Yardbirds' "Still I'm Sad" was a remarkable source of inspiration in this country. The Loosers are winners with their variation of the theme.


Fith Dead
(Fьnfter Toter?) Yeah, grat! Full! Death walks behind you! Satan never sleeps. This one comes right out of the magic washroom. Too good to be true. Every self-attested detective of the "Too-obviously-a-fake-departement" will try to prove that this is a Metabolismustrack, recorded last week. Hold your peace, nose-white-hoax-snifflers! Germany '69, CCA records.
A sinister soundtrack for your private doomsday party in two parts. The invention of Death Metal. Better run from the devil's gun Morbid Angel...
(Fith Dead: A German band, but the single was released in 1975.)


The Kingbeats
The Methusalems among us might remamber this band from the outskirts of Frankfurt and their effort to break the charts in late '65 with "Archibald II", an awkward attempt to excel the nonsense of Herman's Hermits' "Henry VIII". Anyway, "Hear What I Say" is of quite a different calibre. Take "Walking In The Sand", "Still I'm Sad" and "Eve Of Destruction", rip'em to shreds and puzzle a monster. Don't forget a tablespoon of "Play With Fire". No kidding, it really is that good. And, yes we're going to reveal some day. 


The Sevens
Yeah, they are from Switzerland. All of them. Not even a german grandma in sight. But we're not playing ice-hockey here. Listen to "Love Of A Bird" and you'll know why we couldn't resist. They don't need to mention the bees and the flowers and the trees to tell you what diddy wah diddy means.


The J.P.'s
are from Hannover and were the nucleus of what was to become one of the most successsful German bands, Jane! They declare war to "The War" in a slightly more agressive way than Antoine did. We couldn't find out what they did between '66 and '72 and what the abbreviation stands for. (Justice of the Peace? Judas Pimp? Jane's Parents?) Wolfgang Krantz & Klaus Hess reappeared in Effendi's Garden in '79. One of the best and rarest german records.


The Gents Inc.
Sorry, nothing. They shared an LP with The Capras on the Falcon label. "Gettin' The Blues" is their masterpiece. And don't you fret, you'll get a lot, but not the Blues. (Second pressing of the same LP was given away free by "Chips-frisch").


Magic Herbs
Beautiful song. Sounds like an outtake from The Stones' outtake LP "Metamorphosis". And a nice name for a bunch of blind kids. They met at the "School for the Blind", Marburg/Lahn. Won a band contest in '65 (The Golden Guitar) which led to a contract with Kerston Records. They couldn't see, but had the perfect ear and, moreover, a tremendous sense of humour. Their second single is called "Look At Her"... (Happy being able to prove the facts. We've been accused of too much fantasy last time).


The Rebbels
Ah, that's the good thing about misspelling a name. These are not The Rebels who caused a scandal by letting their trousers down during a 30 minutes version of "Gloria" on a Radio Show broadcasted from Helgoland.
They give us the original version of "Space Oddity" instad. Sound and vision! Out at Cape Adenauer in half an hour, eating Sauerkraut in space. Major Tom's got nothing on this one...


Les Copains
Ashes on my head. In 1966 you could have picked this jewel out of every bargain bin at Woolworth's for Pfennigs. We didn't cause we thought they're french. (Rock'n Roll, kдs-koe-zдh?)
Not only are they not. "The Buddies" will pin you to the wall with the weirdest stuff ever released in this country. Try to record a song like "I'm So Lonely" in '94 and you'll end straight in the asylum. The Monks were ahead of their time. Their labelmates are still ignored. I've seen fire and brimstone coming down on my head. I did expect the Spanish Inquisition, but I didn't expect Les Copains.


Daisy Clan
Quite a familiar name in the late sixties. They released a whole lotta vinyl in a whole lotta styles, aiming at the charts. Michael "Mendocino" Holm had a finger in the pye, though obviously not on this single from 1970 "Glory Be" owes more than a warm hand-shake to the Zombies' "She's not There", but wait, Caesar, don't turn your thumb down too soon. The sound of the guitar solo might split a weaker man's spine. (Golden 12)


The Cherry Stones
Their story is a short one. All we know is that their stone-fruit monolith on Jo May Productions is one of the most wanted among collectors of the Kraut. Cancel your summer holiday for a copy. The rancorous Garage Punk on the A-side needs no recommendation. The flip is a case of love it or leave it, and in fact not all of the members of the Anti-Oblivion-League had their thumbs up at first. A little ridiculous, but a daring attempt. What are they trying to do? Interbreeding Dylan with Caruso? Had a sleepless night 'till I found out where I've heard this one before. It's the flip of the very first Small Faces Single. Marriott & Co. took it from "Timi Yuro's Greatest Hits". What a long strange trip...
(The Cherry Stones: A swedish band, but this single was only released in Germany)


The Kentuckys
from Wuppertal had two singles on a label we'd rather not mention any more. This one is straight Kentucky Bourbon 86% proof (at least). Heavy fuzz guitar, Sam The Sham organ and a sad story about drug abuse.


The Rocking Stars
were among the first bands to record for a real big company. Their "Susie Darling" sold well enough to justify an LP of similar Rock'n Roll inspired material. Not bad at all, but nothing you couldn't live without. On "Flames Of Love" they prove what a hot little band they could have been without the chains of the industry and the stranglehold of a staff producer.


The Wild Cats
came from Goslar and recorded for Storz. Good singer and an unusual organ dominated sound in these days. Contenders in the Star Club Battle Of The Bans January '65, but not wild enough to win. Some 30 years later we should be prepared for their clever jingle jangling. 


The Dukes
are responsible for three of the most deranged examples of german poetry. Their last effort, "Vera Petruschka" sucks a bit musically and might offend our russian friends. Noblesse oblige. "The Dentist" is a sincere support to the national health campaign in the best Dragons tradition (remember "Heart Transplantation"?). "I'm An Unskilled Worker" should be the international anthem of all us workshy freaks of the world. Unite and stay in bed! Keep smoking, grow gills. If only they had avoided adding Adolf Hitler to their gallery of famous unskilled workers. A doubtful joke even 30 years ago...(Alcora Rec.)

Dank an: Thomas G., Nini S., Pauki und Michael E.

V.A. - Heimatliche Klaenge vol.50 Prae-Kraut Pandaemonium Vol.2


Prae-Kraut Pandaemonium Vol.2

1 The Inner Space & Rosy Rosy - KameraSong
2 Rainy Daze - What Do You Think
3 Nyrvana Pancake - Open Your Eyes
4 Malepartus II - Lisbeth
5 Casey Jones & The Governors - Bumble Bee
6 The Bats - Got A Girl
7 Novak's Kapelle - Hypodermic Needle
8 The Beats - With A Girl Like You
9 Andy Nevison & His Rhythm-Masters - Indiano   
10 The Improved Sound LTD - Hit 'Em In The Face   
11 The Shaggys - I Need You So   
12 Ric & The Skyliners - She's Gone  
13 The Riats - One More Parade   
14 The Rags - I Cry For Love   
15 The Renegades - Can't You See   
16 The Beatigheimers - Warum? 

Inner Space: The existence of this record has been widely denied. According to the official "CAN-Book", the band changed it's name from Inner Space to Can in December 1968. One month earlier, they had recorded the music for a movie called "kama Sutra". The Single "Kama Sutra, parts 1 & 2" saw the light of the day in January '69 on Metronome, credited to Irmin Schmidt alone, and Inner Space was used as the name for the Can studio fro now on. What we have here is an Inner Space Single from '68 on Vogue, writers credits go to Irmin, Mischa and K. Lea (whoever Mr. Lea may be...). It's a soundtrack again, although we've never met someone who recalls the movie "Agilok & Blubbo". The flip is the wonderfull "Kamera Song", where Inner Space join forces with Rosy-Rosy, infamous Munich actress, blessed (or cursed) with a set of bells to even scare Russ Meyer. We'd kill for a copy of the movie...

Rainy Daze: One of those groups to be found on cheapo albums like "Beat Raketen International" covering a Tremeloes hit or backing an eratz-Engelbert. When their company gave them the one chance to record original material, they had to hide this gem on the back.

Nyrvana Pancake: this 69 private pressing (no label) is the closest we'll get to touching the real Kraut Rock. They've been seen a lot in and around Stuttgart, if my memory serves me well...

Malepartus II: Big Label, no hit. He was our very own Napoleon XIV and they came to take him away after this two-sided proof of insanity. If you speak German, you know where he came from, if not, don't bother learning, his rap comes in Hessian.

Another immigrant combo (Liverpool this time) are Casey Jones and The Governors - As German as the Kaiser, believe me! Half the size of the others, Casey was dropped from Cass And The Cassanovas when they changed their name to The Big Three. Casey Jones And The Engineers recorded in England as well as in Germany, but nothing happened. Changing name to the Governors and label from Bellaphon to Golden 12, they released "Don't Ha Ha" and made The Beatles cliff-hanging No.2 for some weeks in Germany. Among an impressive string of hits, they had this one flop "Bumble Bee". The Searchers went nowhere with the same song, although they avoided singing that one in German. (Strange enough, because they often executed their best songs this way) Well, Casey did it. At least he tried. You don't understand the lyrics? Don't worry, neither do we. Kisuaheli or something.

The Bats - from Hamburg. Appeared first on an Ariola Star Club Sampler, doing covers of R & B standards. Various singles and 6 LP's on their (probably) own Summer label followed, the last one from (hold on to your hats!) 1989, called "Timeless". Countless line-up changes, the treue believer being one Waldemar Kropp, who sang "Nicht zu alt fuer Rock n'Roll in 1988. Too young to die, indeed.

Novaks Kapelle: Comes from Austria, we have to admit. But Vienna's wild men are too weird to be left out, so we stretch the border a bit. Best known for the scandal, the pornographic cover of their '78 album 'Naked' provoked, they were: Helge Thor, Erwin Novak, Peter Travnicek and Walla Mauritz. How they managed to get away with "Hypodermic Needle" in '68 remains a mystery. (Label Amadeo)

The Beats - well never trust a crew with a wicked name like that. Listen and you'll know why we had to include this cover of a rather tame Troggs song. Look at the picture of these blokes. Yes Sir, that's what the sixties were like in Germany. (And by the way, doesn't the big one show a suspicious similarity to our much beloved Mr. Bundeskanzler?) A flexi in an expensive picture sleeve. That sounds a lot like Helmut...

Andi Nevison (and his Rhythm Masters) is a mystery. Doesn't sound very German. Big Hit on a big label (UH-huh!); "Indiano" ruled the airwaves and the dancefloors in this part of the country for a wek or two. This little monster still sends shivers down my spine. Watch out, Lord Sutch!

Improved Sound Ltd.: "Leave This Lesbian World" is not another lecture of the Kaplan, as you might suspect.It's the soundtrack of "Hoppe Hoppe Reiter", an ill-bred attempt to cash-in on the success of the "Wilde Reiter G.m.b.H."-movie. Underground placebo.
Improved Sound Ltd. were: Axel Linstaedt, Johnny Fickert, Uli Ruppert, Rolf Groeschner and Bernd Linstaedt. Playing together since 1961, they came from Modern Jazz to Beat/Pop, at that time as "The Blizzards". In 1965 they worked as backing-band for Roy Black and in 1966 they were No.1 in the "Meet the Beat"-contest of the Bayrischer Rundfunk. Later they made a lot of soundtracks ("Bettelstudent", "O.K.", "Wer im Glashaus liebt") and released 3 records between '69 and'73. They were good musicians and had their moments, but most of the material sounds like "Rent-a-Band".

The Shaggys: came from, well, out of nowhere and went back home after this monumental epic on the R & B label. (R & B stands for whatever you like, definitely not for Rhythm and Blues). If you're looking for a male counterpart to the divine Shaggs (not to be mixed up), you've found it. Breathtaking.

Ric And The Skyliners ('65, Merco Frankfurt) or Rene And The Ten Less Five ('65, Royal Splendid) Hopelessly obscure again (though the Skyliners had 3 more singles), but just as irresistably charming. Hard to say who makes No.1 in our little Kindergarten.

The Riats: his one is a sleeper, growing year to year. The way they sing, The Riats sound rather Dutch than German, but anyway, "One More Parade" is a marvelous piece of Folk Rock, treating Phil Ochs' classic with deserved respect. It's credited to one Philip Ox on the label. Mouth to mouth, those were the days, my friends...

The Dakotas / The Rags / Dave Gordon - sorry, nothing. A group from Stade, called the Rags, fought about 20 other obscure outfits in a Battle of the Bands '65 at the Star Club, but that's it. The 3 tracks are the originals on a sampler of German Bands playing cover versions. (SR-Records)

The Renegades: were exactly that, renegades from their Birmingham play grounds, driven to continental exile by lack of success and to much competition. In 1965 they were Finnlands No. 1 attraction, they rivaled The Sorrows and The Primitives in Italy at the end of the Beatboom, and in between, they rolled up Germany. Not only did they chart with damn fine versions of "Cadillac" and "Take a heart" like they'd just invented acceleration, they even had a minor hit with one of the most explosions of Freak Beat, "13 Women". Like The Monks, The Smoke or The Creation, 
The Renegades were more German than James Last for a while. But be aware, unlike the above mentioned, they were kind of a Jekyll and Hyde-band, totally embarrassing now and then. "Can't You See" was declared B-side to a ridiculous New Vaudeville Band rip-off on the Scandia label.

The Beatigheimers aus Bietigheim natьrlich. Durch private Kontakte gelangten wir an Proberaumaufnahmen dieser Amateurtanzband, die so privat fuer sich anscheinend schon mal die Sau rausliessen. Von ihnen sind keine Vinylveroeffentlichungen bekannt, sie beschraenkten sich auf Auftritte bei Hochzeiten und Firmenfeiern. Wie sie ausgerechnet auf die Idee kamen,Why don't you smile now" (ein Reed/Cale Stueck aus der prae-Velvet Aera) zu covern wird wohl fuer immer ein kleines Mysterium der Beatgeschichte bleiben. Bietigheim-New York, 1966 war die Welt noch klein. Der schwaebische Akzent ist in der deutschen Sprache wohl besonders geeignet, den rotzig arroganten Ton des Beat/R & B-Gesangs an den Mann zu bringen. Hoert selbst!

Errors and Corrections:
Vol. 2: Rainy Daze probably are a British band. The record had a German and a UK-release. But these Rainy Daze definitely are not the better known US-band of the same name. The Riats are a Dutch band. The Beatigheimers are German, but this isn't a record from the 60's
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