Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Beat...Beat... Beat... movie



Beat...Beat... Beat... movie part 4
Beat Beat Beat - vol. 4 

01 - Intro
02 - Info
03 - Girl, Those Where The Good Old Days / Sten & Stanley
04 - Nur der Silbermond
05 - Needle In A Haystack / Tawney Reed
06 - Wiggy Woggy / Sten & Stanley
07 - I've Got A Feeling / Tawney Reed
08 - Info
09 - Run For Your Life / Freddie & The Dreamers
10 - You Were Made For Me
11 - Baby, Baby, Baby / Pete Lancaster
12 - I'm Telling You Now / Freddie & The Dreamers
13 - If You've Got A Minute, Baby
14 - Stupidity / Pete Lancaster
15 - Info
16 - Love Potion No. 9 / The Searchers
17 - Sweets For My Sweet
18 - C.C. Rider / Jenny Take A Ride

Sunday, April 24, 2011

The Wailers - Out Of Our Tree (1966)


The Wailers' final album for Etiquette, Out of Our Tree was a somewhat confused effort. It was torn between covers of mid-'60s hits and original material, usually in their R&B-soaked raunchy style, though with touches of influences from British Invasion groups and the emerging American garage rock scene. Certainly its highlight was the title track (eventually included on the Nuggets box set), with its grinding sub-"Satisfaction" riff. But other original numbers on the record were frenetic yet undistinguished rewrites of '50s-style rock & roll numbers, though "Hang Up" was a pretty fair tough garage rocker. And there were too many covers of well-known hits -- "Hang on Sloopy," the Beatles' "I'm Down," "Unchained Melody," "Mercy Mercy," "Summertime" -- that neither matched better-known prior versions or added much to them, though the screaming white-soul vocal on Hank Ballard's "Little Sister" is pretty harrowing. If the whole album had been on the level of "Out of Our Tree" and "Hang Up," this would be a notable slice of wired, edgy mid-'60s garage rock




The Wailers - Wailers Everywhere (1965)

  
Continuation...

For their first LP recorded after the onset of the British Invasion, the Wailers wrote most of the material themselves. It was a change from previous Wailers efforts, as the sound usually reflected the influences of the Beatles and other early British Invasion stars like the Dave Clark Five, as well as some of the harmony rock of the Beach Boys and the Four Seasons. This was a farsighted strategy as far as career survival went, but fell down on its shortage of good original songs. For the most part it had tepid British Invasion-like harmony rockers, sounding very much like strained attempts to adapt their R&B-frat rock sound 
01 - You Better Believe It
02 - Do You Wanna Dance
03 - The Wailer
04 - Tomorrow's Another Day
05 - Just A Little Bit Louder
06 - Hold Back The Dawn
07 - Tears
08 - Since You Been Gone
09 - How Do You Feel
10 - I Think Of You
11 - Don't Take It So Hard
12 - Ya Ya

Chad & Jeremy - Yesterday's Gone, A Golden Classics Edition


Discussions of the "quiet is the new loud" aesthetic of bands like Belle & Sebastian and Kings of Convenience typically cite primal influences like Nick Drake, Donovan, and the Velvet Underground, but rarely if ever mentioned is a duo that predated them all -- listening to Chad & Jeremy many decades on, it now seems almost as if they pioneered an entire genre, their string-sweetened, pastoral, and hopelessly twee acoustic pop anticipating so much of the sound in vogue at the turn of the century to follow. Collectables' Yesterday's Gone compiles 18 tracks from Chad & Jeremy's chart heyday of 1963-1966, although it suffers by forgoing material from the twosome's subsequent LPs, Distant Shores and The Ark. Leading off with the gorgeously wistful "A Summer Song," the disc weaves together their biggest hits and also features a few unlikely covers, including the traditional favorite "Dirty Old Town" and a suitably autumnal if otherwise baffling rendition of the Sinatra chestnut "A Very Good Year." A solid introduction, with fidelity a notch or two higher than the standard Collectables release.




Amen Corner - If Paradise Was Half As Nice The Immediate Anthology 1969



Amen Corner was a Welsh R&B-tinged pop band of the '60s featuring singer Andy Fairweather Low, organist Blue Weaver, guitarist Neil Jones, bassist Clive Taylor, saxophonists Allen Jones and Mike Smith, and drummer Dennis Bryon. They scored the first of their six British chart hits with "Gin House" in the summer of 1967. "(If Paradise Is) Half as Nice" went to number one in early 1969. By then, Fairweather Low had become a teenage heartthrob and the band had switched management and record companies, but they split up by the end of the year.




The 35 songs on this double-CD set represent the output of Amen Corner on Immediate Records from 1968 through 1970. Listening to the 23 tracks on the first disc, one gets a good idea of the group's sound, and also why certain kinds of English pop/rock never transferred well to American shores. Amen Corner was spirited (even frenzied) enough in their playing and singing, but they also came off as a very lightweight group, without a lot of depth -- mostly that was true of their singles, but the singles were what defined them. The septet's primary audience was a peculiarly youthful English public, and appealing to them meant generating music that was upbeat but very superficial, along the lines of the Tremeloes, but without the in-house writing talent or the same ear for a good song. "(If Paradise Is) Half as Nice" is a pleasant, catchy track, as are "Hello Susie" (though their version of the Roy Wood tune is bubblegum pop next to the Move's recording on Shazam) and most of the rest, but they all seem more like songs that are pleasant to hear rather than to play -- that is, they're fine on the radio, but to ears belonging to anyone over the age of, say, 16, they're not the kind of music that one runs out to buy. Still, there was a fair amount of talent in evidence -- beyond Neil Jones' spirited guitar playing, keyboard man Blue Weaver added interesting organ fills, and on numbers like "Mr. Nonchalant" (an Andy Fairweather Low composition, and one of their better originals), they do achieve a more expansive sound. Fairweather Low was strongly influenced by American soul music in his singing, but finding the balance between that and the pop/rock sound that sold for the group was a near-impossible task, at least in the studio; "Recess," one of the outtakes unearthed after the band's demise, illustrates their usual output, a bouncy, catchy teen-beat number with a honking sax that is pure bubblegum. And then there is the second disc in this set, comprised of their concert album, The National Welsh Coast Live Explosion Company -- and that's the highlight of this set. Turned loose on-stage, Amen Corner could put on a rousing show broken down evenly between American soul ("Baby Do the Philly Dog," "Shake a Tail Feather," etc.) and their established hits, including their pre-Immediate successes on Decca Records. They pound and stomp their way through the music that they love like nobody's business, Clive Taylor's bass and Dennis Byron's drums holding everything together while Fairweather Low, Weaver, and Jones soar. This was (and is) the way to hear Amen Corner, and if one can ignore a useless cover of "Penny Lane," it's a nearly perfect concert album -- Fairweather Low's singing even sounds better here than it does on many of the group's studio recordings; and if the overall recording quality isn't perfect, it is distinctly superior here to any prior CD and LP editions of this performance. The annotation is also very thorough, and nicely illustrated as well. ~ Bruce Eder

The Wailers - Tall Cool One (also The Wailers And Company) 1964


Continuation of  Topic

Here's a reissue of the Wailers' Imperial album from the early '60s, after the original version of "Tall Cool One" on Golden Crest had charted once again. Frustrated with their deal with the New York label, the group went into the studio, recut their hit, and packaged it with a brace of loose instrumental workouts and a trio of vocals. One of those vocals is the original Northwest cut of "Louie Louie," featuring an inspired vocal by the legendary Rockin' Robin Roberts, being the version that inspired the Kingsmen and launched a million frat bands worldwide. Another chapter in the history of this very important and influential Northwest rock & roll band.
01 - Tall Cool One
02 - Seattle
03 - Hokey
04 - Louie Louie
05 - Doin' The Seaside
06 - We're Going Surfin'
07 - Frenzy
08 - Shakedown
09 - Party Time U.S.A.
10 - Tough Walk
11 - Isabella
12 - Mashi

The La De Das - The La De Das (1966 - 1967)


Aside from Ray Columbus & the Invaders, the La De Das were New Zealand's most popular rock group of the '60s. As big fish in a very small pond, their work doesn't hold up to scrutiny in the company of the era's top American and English acts. But they did record some fine garage/pop numbers in the spirit of the Rolling Stones in the mid-'60s. A few of these ("How Is the Air Up There?" and "All Purpose Low") were big N.Z. hits, and they reached the Top Ten with covers of John Mayall's "On Top of the World" and a version of Bruce Channel's "Hey Baby." In 1968, they recorded a psychedelic-tinged children's concept LP, The Happy Prince; which bears resemblance to modern twee. After a failed attempt to crack the British market, the group soldiered on for quite some time with pedestrian hard rock that -- like even the best of their early work -- was very derivative of overseas trends.



The Easybeats - Absolute Anthology 1965 -69 (2 CD)



The Easybeats occupy a unique place in the pantheon of 1960s British rock acts. For starters, they were Australian, except that they really weren't -- they met in Sydney alright, and being based in Australia with the talent they had gave them a leg-up over any of the local competition. But lead singer Stevie Wright originally came from England (although he'd been in Australia for some years), and bassist Dick Diamonde hailed from the Netherlands, as did guitarist Harry Vanda, while the others, guitarists George Young and drummer Gordon "Snowy" Fleet, were recent arrivals from Scotland and England -- most significantly, Fleet was Liverpool born and raised, and had been a member of the Mojos, one of that city's more promising bands of 1963 and 1964. They all had talent, but he had a sense of style and an idea of what worked in rock & roll; it was Snowy Fleet who came up with the name "the Easybeats," and the sharp image for the early group, which made them a piece of authentic Brit-beat right in the heart of Sydney, 13,000 miles from Liverpool and as precious there as water on a desert.



After honing their sound and building a name locally around Sydney in late 1964, the group was signed to Albert Productions who, in turn, licensed their releases to Australian EMI's Parlophone label. Ted Albert, their producer, seemed to recognize what he had in a group of talented, newly-transplanted Englishmen and Europeans -- the real article, and a rare musical commodity in Australia. The band was signed up with 20 original songs already written, and as they sounded fresh, he simply let the band cut them, merely making sure the music came out right on vinyl. Working from originals primarily written by Stevie Wright, by himself or in collaboration with George Young, the group's early records (especially the albums) were highly derivative of the Liverpool sound, which was fine by all concerned. What made it special was the sheer energy that the quintet brought to the equation -- they were highly animated in the studio and on stage, they looked cool and rebellious, and they sang and played superbly.

"For My Woman," their debut single, issued in March of 1965, was an ominous garage punk bolero, featuring Stevie Wright in an agonized lament, accompanied by brittle, bluesy rhythm and lead guitar parts that called to mind the early Kinks. "She's So Fine," their second single, brought out two months later, shot to number one in Australia and was one of the great records of its era -- musically, it flew out of the gate like a rocket, a frantic, hook-laden celebration of female pulchritude from the point of view of an unrequited male admirer that grabbed the listener and wouldn't let go, across two minutes of raw excitement. Their debut album Easy, issued the following September, was a bit more influenced by the Hollies (and especially by Tony Hicks' playing) and, to a lesser degree, the Beatles and any number of lesser known Merseybeat acts, but whatever it lacked in originality, they made up for with an attack on their instruments that, coupled with Wright's searing, powerful lead vocals, made them one of the best British rock & roll acts of the period and Easy one of the best of all British Invasion albums (though it took more than 30 years for it to be released officially outside of Australia).

In Australia, they were the reigning kings of rock & roll from the summer of 1965 onward, assembling a string of eight Top Ten chart hits in a year and a half, including an EP that managed the unusual feat of making the singles chart. Their second album, It's 2 Easy, was a match for their first, a genuinely exciting collection of British Invasion-style rock & roll whose only fault -- assuming that this was a fault -- was that it seemed a year out-of-date in style when it was released in 1966. That, however, pointed to the fundamental bind that the band faced; they'd conquered Australia and could do no wrong by keeping their sound the same, as the changes taking place in rock music filtered only very slowly across the Pacific. By George Young's own account, the band could have gone on writing and playing the same kind of songs for years in Australia and nobody would have minded, but he had ideas for more complex and daring music. By mid-1966, the Wright/Young songwriting team had become history, but in its place Vanda and Young began writing songs together. Additionally, the group had become so successful, that it was inevitable that they'd try to expand their audience, and that didn't mean side trips to New Zealand. In the fall of 1966, the Easybeats were ready to make the jump that no Australian rock & roll act had yet done successfully, and headed for England.

In November of 1966, with legendary producer Shel Talmy (of Who and Kinks fame) managing their recordings, the group scored its first U.K. hit with "Friday on My Mind." A product of Vanda and Young's songwriting, the song embodied all of the fierce kinetic energy of their Australian hits but was written at a new level of sophistication, with an amazing number of musical "events" taking place in its three minutes: An opening two-note staccato figure (backed by a cymbal crash) blooms into a pseudo-Arabesque quotation on the guitar, rising higher while the singer intones a frantic tale of work, fun, and escape, covering the days of the work week (in a manner vaguely reminiscent of "Rock Around the Clock"'s trip around an idealized 24 hours in a teenager's life, and also declaring working class defiance in the manner of "Summertime Blues"); a chorus chimed in at an even higher register, notching up the tension even as the tempo quickens and also broadening the tonal palette, in a manner akin to the early psychedelia of the period. With all of that activity and excitement within the context of a three-minute pop song, and two catchy hooks, it was impossible to get tired of "Friday on My Mind," in any language. It rose to the Top Ten not only in England but across Europe and much of the rest of the world, and reached the Top 20 in the United States as well where, for the first time, Americans became aware of the Easybeats.

The group spent seven months in England, writing new, more ambitious songs and also performing before new audiences, most notably in Germany, where they were greeted with an enthusiasm rivaling their appearances in Australia, and left behind a notable series of live television appearances. The band's return to Australia in May of 1967 for a national tour marked the high point of their history. Unfortunately, it would be the last unbridled success that they would know -- the group moved their base of operations to London, where the Vanda/Young songwriting team began composing ever more complex songs, in keeping with the flourishing psychedelic era. Some of the songs were superb, but the same charmed existence that the group had led up to that point seemed to desert them in 1967-1968 -- their single "Heaven and Hell" was banned from the radio in England for one suggestive line, and a six-month lag for a follow-up cost them momentum that they never reclaimed. Additionally, they lost some cohesiveness in their sound as the members began indulging in the chemical and other diversions at hand in still swinging London -- they worked in the studio, making some extremely complex recordings during late 1967 and early 1968, and the songs, including "Falling Off the Edge of the World" and "Come in You'll Get Pneumonia," were as good as anything being written in rock at the time. The Easybeats, however, were no longer as exciting a group to listen to or see, when they actually did perform. By mid-1969, the band had receded to a mere shadow of itself, and their music had regressed to a form of good-time singalong music, similar to the work of the Tremeloes, pleasant enough but nothing like the kind of work they'd been generation just two years before. Their final grasp at international success came with the single "St. Louis," which managed to scrape the very bottom of the American Hot 100.

The band decided to call it quits following a return to Australia for one final tour, after which Harry Vanda and George Young became full-time songwriter/producers, helped organize AC/DC (featuring Young's siblings Angus Young and Malcolm Young), and generated the 1973 hit "Evie" for Stevie Wright. Their string of successes has stretched into the new century -- "Friday on My Mind" remains in print in dozens of editions throughout the world, as recorded by the Easybeats and others; and in 2001, their late '70s disco hit "Love Is in the Air" (primarily associated with John Paul Young), was licensed for use in two different commercials for two separate products (a car and a credit card) running simultaneously on American television. Meanwhile, the Easybeats' complete output has been issued on CD through the Repertoire label (making their 1965-1966 Australian sides widely available around the world for the first time), and anthologies of their work are in print in England and America. Such was the demand for their music in the late 1990s, that Australia's Raven Records has also issued Live, Studio and Stage, the first full-length collection of live recordings by the group, assembled from across their history.

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.69 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.12


Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.69

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 12


01 - Don Paulin - Die Moorsoldaten ( Philips 346 013 PF )  1966
02 - Peter Yarrow - Das ist die Freiheit, die ich meine ( WB 16 202 )  1972
03 - The Springfields - Sag mir, wo die Blumen sind ( Philips 433 643 BF )  1963
04 - Peter, Paul & Mary - Die Antwort weiss ganz allein der Wind ( Warner Brothers A 5560 )  1963
05 - The Caravelles - Georgia Boy ( uv )  2007
06 - Don Hill - Du bist mein Glьck und Sonnenschein ( NH 53 063 )  1968
07 - Shawn Elliot - Matilda ( DVS 14 474 )  1966
08 - Julie Felix - Sie hiess Lisa ( UK 2012 015 )  1975
09 - The Springfields - Alles Gold und alles Silber ( 326 585 BF, 433 643 BF )  1963
10 - Don Paulin - Alice's Restaurant (parts 1)  ( Liberty L 15 332 )  1969
11 - Don Paulin - Alice's Restaurant (parts 2)  ( Liberty L 15 332 )  1969
12 - Die Caravelles - Darauf fall ich nicht rein ( NH 52 560 )  1965
13 - The New Christy Minstrels - Grьn, grьn ist Tennessee ( CBS 1232 )  1963
14 - Castlegate Trio - Fдhrmann, hol ьber ( Ariola 18 158 AT )  1965
15 - Don Hill - Der Wind, der leis ein Lied singt ( NH 53 053 )  1968
16 - Peter, Paul & Mary - Puff ( Puff, The Magic Dragon ) ( Warner Brothers WB 8071, A 163 )  1963
17 - Peter Yarrow - Nur ein Leben zu Leben ( Warner Brothers WB 16 257 )  1973
18 - The Springfields - Das kostet keinen Pfenning ( Philips 433 643 BF )  1963
19 - Die Caravelles - Liebe kommt und geht ( Depend On You ) ( uv )  2007
20 - Shawn Elliot - Denk daran ( Little Bird ) ( DVS 14 474 )  1966
21 - The Springfields - Ich geh ohne Ruh durch die Strassen und Gassen ( 326 585 BF, 433 643 BF )  1963
22 - The Caravelles - Keine Rose blьht fьrs Leben ( NH 52 560 )  1965
23 - The Blue Hill Boys - Weit war der Weg nach Montana ( Philips 345 849 PF )  1965
24 - Peter, Paul & Mary - Pretty Mary ( Warner Brothers A 5560 )  1963
25 - Toni Fisher - Dort in Berlin ( West Of The Wall ) ( uv )  2007
26 - Peter Yarrow - Auf ein besseres Leben ( Warner Brothers WB 16 202 )  1972

V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.68 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.11




Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.68

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 11


01 - Dickie Rock & The Miami Show Band - Rock 'N' Roll Music ( DV 14 369 )  1965
02 - Freddie Starr - Du wirst niemals einsam sein (You'll Never Walk Alone) ( uv )  2007
03 - The 5 Liverpools - Tokio ( CBS 1623 )  1964
04 - Denny Seyton's Show Group - Hush A Bye ( Decca D 19 681 )  1965
05 - Isabella Bond - Bread And Butter ( Decca D 19 657 )  1964
06 - John O'Hara & His Playboys - Das war gestern ( Decca D 19 553 )  1964
07 - Kent Aston & The Sorcerers - Baby lass uns tanzen gehen ( Kerston 60 019 )  1966
08 - Colin Anthony & The Beat Combo - Crazy Beatle Boots ( Fontana 269 316 TF )  1964
09 - Keith West & Mark Wirtz - Engel fallen nicht vom Himmel ( Columbia C 23 739 )  1968
10 - Peter & Gordon - Liebe, Glьck und Treue ( Columbia C 23 442 )  1967
11 - Bobby Goldsboro - Es ist zu spдt (It's Too Late) ( uv )  2007
12 - Isabella Bond - Tennessee Waltz ( Decca SLK 16 333 )  1964
13 - Denny Seyton's Show Group - Du bist meine wahre Liebe ( Decca D 19 682 )  1965
14 - John O'Hara & His Playboys - 1-2-3 (ist dein kleiner Schmerz vorbei) ( Decca D 19 553 )  1964
15 - Barry Ryan - Goodbye ( Spectrum 554 117 )  1968
16 - The Spencer Davis Group - (Aquarius) Der Wassermann ( UA 67 129 )  1968
17 - John O'Hara & His Playboys - Stampfkartoffeln Tд-Tд-Rд ( Decca D 19 552 )  1964
18 - Kent Aston & The Sorcerers - I Love A Girl From Heidelberg ( Kerston 60 019 )  1966
19 - Isabella Bond - Downtown ( Decca D 19 657 )  1964
20 - Keith West & Mark Wirtz - Shy Boy ( Columbia C 23 739 )  1968
21 - Peter & Gordon - Wunder ( Columbia C 23 442 )  1967
22 - Denny Seyton's Show Group - Mir geht es wieder besser ( Decca D 19 681 )  1965
23 - Paul Rodgers - Meine Liebe wird niemals enden ( NH 52 349 )  1964
24 - Bobby Goldsboro - Warum macht Liebe so blind ( uv )  2007
25 - Tommy Kent & die Liverpooler Blue Beats - Sheila ( Ariola 10 718 AT )  1964
26 - Tommy Kent & die Liverpooler Blue Beats - Hey Sunny ( Ariola 10 718 AT )  1964

V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.67 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.10


Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.67

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 10


01 - Dusty Springfield - Auf dich nur wart ich immerzu ( Philips 345 758 PF )  1964
02 - Kiki Dee - Warte bis morgen ( Fontana 267 437 TF )  1965
03 - Millie - My Boy Lollipop ( Fontana 267 376 TF )  1964
04 - The Caravelles - So geht die Liebe still vorbei ( NH 52 484 )  1965
05 - Sue & Sunny -  Shame On You ( Electrola E 23 490 )  1967
06 - Jakie Trent - Bye Bye My Love ( Auf Wiedersehn ) ( Hit Ton HT 300 137 )  1967
07 - Julie Rogers - Glocken der Liebe ( Mercury 154 233 )  1965
08 - Janie Marden - Solang man noch nicht 17 ist ( Bellaphon BL 1015 )  1965
09 - Millie - I Like Mike ( Fontana 269 324 TF )  1964
10 - Lulu - Wenn du da bist ( Decca D 19 760, D 19 987 )  1966
11 - Twinkle - Tommy ( Decca DL 25 185 )  1965
12 - Kiki Dee - Nein, ich weiss nicht mehr, was ich tu ( Fontana 267 631 TF )  1966
13 - Cherry Roland - Was ist Geld, was ist Gold ( Decca DL 19 812 )  1966
14 - Susan Maughan - Dream Boy ( Philips 345 782 PF )  1965
15 - The McKinliay Sisters - Grosse Katastrophe ( Fontana 269 404 TF )  1968
16 - Millie - Karussell ( Fontana 269 324 TF )  1964
17 - Janie Marden - Weisst du noch, Darling ( Bellaphon BL 1015 )  1965
18 - Lulu - So fing es an ( Decca D 19 760, D 19 987 )  1966
19 - Jakie Trent - Alles okay ( Hit Ton HT 300 137 )  1967
20 - Sue & Sunny -  Wir dummen Mдdchen sind ja selber schuld ( Electrola E 23 604 )  1968
21 - The Caravelles - In Gedanken bin ich bei dir ( NH 52 484 )  1965
22 - The McKinliay Sisters - Bye, Bye, Bye ( Fontana 269 353 TF )  1967
23 - Kiki Dee - Johnnys Kuss ( Fontana 267 631 TF )  1966
24 - Miliie - Sweet William ( Fontana 267 394 TF )  1964

V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.66 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.9


Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.66

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 9


01 - Eileen - Die Stiefel sind zum Wandern ( Vogue DV 14 495 )  1966
02 - The Supremes - Moonlight And Kisses ( CBS 1719 )  1965
03 - Dionne Warwick - Geh vorbei ( Vogue DV 14 298 )  1965
04 - Lesley Gore - Goodbye, Tony ( Mercury 127 131 )  1964
05 - Marcie Blane - Wer einmal 'A' gesagt ( London DL 20 694 )  1963
06 - Katja Hollдnder - Wenn ich deinen Namen hцr ( NH 52 700 )  1966
07 - Gale Garnett - Schцn, schцn, schцn ist das Leben ( RCA 47-9671 )  1962
08 - Connie Stevens - Man soll sich so schnell nicht verlieben ( Warner Brother A 5338 )  1961
09 - Eileen - Nimm die Gitarre ( Vogue DV 14 495 )  1966
10 - The Supremes - Thank You Darling ( CBS 1819 )  1965
11 - Katja Hollдnder - Weine nicht um einen Boy ( Populдr Pop 3022 )   1967
12 - Lucy Lynn - Ist es denn Liebe ( Gulf 1640 )  1963
13 - Donna Hightower - Liebe macht blind ( Ariola 18 762 AT )  1966
14 - Connie Stevens - La-le-lu ( Warner Brother A 5338 )  1961
15 - Eileen - Teenage Summer ( Hit ton HT 300 011 ) 1966
16 - Donna Gaines - Der Wassermann ( NH 53 107 )  1968
17 - Marcie Blane - So ist das Leben ( London DL 20 694 )  1963
18 - Dionne Warwick - Ich warte jeden Tag ( Vogue DV 14 298 )  1965
19 - Gale Garnett - Denk bitte heute nicht an morgen ( RCA 47-9671 )  1962
20 - Katja Hollдnder - Er heisst Peter ( NH 52 700 )  1966
21 - Donna Hightower - Casablanca ( Ariola 18 762 AT )  1966
22 - The Supremes - Jonny And Joe ( CBS 1839 )  1965
23 - Eileen - Das wird mir nicht mal leid tun ( Hit ton HT 300 011 )  1966
24 - Connie Stevens - Du bist mein ( uv )  2002
25 - Marie Ann - ( I Know That ) Your Heart's Not Made Of Wood ( engl & deutsch ) ( Epic 5-9565 )  1961
26 - Sue Thompson - Blonder Tiger ( CBS 1965 )  1965

V.A. - Das Zundet - Tanzmusik fur junge Leute (1968)


Surf from GDR
AMIGA label


A1
Theo Schumann Combo–
Nachtzug
 Written-By – Schumann* 
A2
Evgeni Kantschev Quintett–
Sonnenbrand
 Written-By – Peters* 
A3
Horst Krüger Sextett–
Erwartung
 Written-By – Düwelt* 
A4
Berlin Dixies–
Der Minirock
 Written-By – Krüger* 
A5
Günther Fischer Quartett–
Das Schloss
 Written-By – Fischer* 
A6
Studio-Sextett Erfurt–
Party-Zeit
 Written-By – Naue* 
A7
Satelliten Gera–
Herbstwind
 Written By – Thomä 
A8
Klaus Lenz Sextett–
Greensleves
 Written-By – Traditional


B1
Günther Fischer Quartett–
Vorspann
 Written-By – Fischer* 
B2
Theo Schumann Combo–
Korallenriff
 Written-By – Schumann* 
B3
Studio-Sextett Erfurt–
Du Bist Meine Liebe
 Written By – Sondermann 
B4
Horst Krüger Sextett–
Leopard
 Written-By – Anders* 
B5
Evgeni Kantschev Quintett–
Dragia
 Written-By – Traditional From Bulgaria* 
B6
Berlin Dixies–
Warum Muss Die Liebe Vorbeigehn?
 Written-By – Petersen* 
B7
Klaus Lenz Sextett–
Bunte Bilder
 Written-By – Fischer* 
B8
Satelliten Gera–
Unheimliche Nacht
 Written By – Thomä/Erhardt 

Thanks for Yarrost (yarrost.livejournal.com)
and
 music.tonnel.ru

Monday, April 18, 2011

V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.65 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.8




Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.65

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 8


01 - Barry Ryan - Zeit macht nur vor dem Teufel halt ( Polydor 2001 207 )  1971
02 - Kincade - Jenny, Jenny ( Bellaphon BL 11 238 )  1973
03 - Sheila McKinlay - Ich geh' mir dir ( Ariola 10 319 AT )  1971
04 - Jimmy Patrick - Rain, Rain, Rain ( CBS 1430 )  1973
05 - Olivia Newton-John - Unten am Fluss, der Ohio heisst ( Polydor 2001 274 )  1971
06 - The Love Generation - Israel ( United Artist UA 35 477 )  1973
07 - Paul Da Vinci - Das Leben fдngt erst eben fьr dich an ( Bellaphon BL 11 033 )  1974
08 - Richard Barnes - Heute sind es keine Trдume ( Ariola 12 700 AT )  1973
09 - The New Seekers - Oh, ich will betteln, ich will stehlen ( Philips 6006 207 )  1972
10 - Zakatek - Roter Mann ( Polydor 2008 264 )  1974
11 - Dana - Kannst du denn nicht verzeihn ( Polydor 2099 146 )  1975
12 - Daniel Boone - Beautiful Sunday ( Bellaphon BL 11 206 )  1972
13 - Terry Jacks - In den Gдrten der Zeit ( Polydor 2008 249 )  1974
14 - Tina - Hand auf's Herz ( Polydor 2058 456 )  1974
15 - Tony Jayson - Wer weiss, wohin uns der Sturm weht ( Polydor 2041 638 )  1975
16 - Donny Osmond - Bleib bei mir, little Girl( Polydor 2006 089 )  1971
17 - Chris Montez - Nur du ( CBS 2764 )  1974
18 - Lee Patterson - Girl, I Love You So ( Philips 6003 116 )  1971
19 - Shepstone & Dibbens - Man kann Frauen selten trauen ( Polydor 2040 112 )  1973
20 - John Dolan - Tina ( Ariola 10 951 AT )  1972
21 - Jon Simon - Ich wдr so gern Millionдr ( Ariola 16 390 AT )  1975
22 - Candyfloss - Delta Queen ( Polydor 2041 367 )  1972
23 - Bill & Buster - Hol dir den Sonnenschein ( Ariola 10 107 AT )  1970
24 - Tony Sheridan & Carole - Lieber hab ich dich ( uv )  1975


Drafi Deutscher - Marmor, Stein Und Eisen Bricht


He was born Drafi Franz Richard Deutscher in Berlin. His best known song was the 1965 Schlager "Marmor, Stein und Eisen bricht" ("Marble, Stone and Iron Breaks") which sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[2] It later featured in the 2006 film Beerfest, during the Oktoberfest scene. Between 1964 and 1966 Deutscher had a lot of hits in Germany, for example Shake Hands (1964 # 1), Keep Smiling (1964 # 7), Cinderella Baby (1965 #3), Heute male ich dein Bild, Cindy-Lou (1965 # 1)[3] After his 1965 hit Marmor, Stein und Eisen bricht, his career in Germany was in full swing until shaken by a 1967 verdict for public indecency (Erregung öffentlichen Ärgernisses) after he had urinated from a balcony while drunk, in plain view of a group of schoolchildren watching him from street level.
He also composed several worldwide hits for Boney M, Nino de Angelo and Tony Christie. In the 1980s he achieved success with his duo, Mixed Emotions, together with Oliver Simon. Deutscher also worked with Christopher Evans Ironside, collaborating with him in the band named Masquerade, and on their co-written hit "Guardian Angel".


thanks for Yrrost (yarrost.livejournal.com)


OTHER :


V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.64 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.7



Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.64

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 7

01 - Leroy Van Dyke - Geh nicht vorbei ( Mercury MCF 127 035 )  1962
02 - Lyn Anderson - Ein Herz aus Stein ( Cornet 3075 )  1969
03 - Bobby Bare - Molly Brown ( RCA 47-9685 )  1965
04 - Jim Ed Brown - Golden Girl ( Blonde Trдume ) ( RCA 47-9679 )  1966
05 - Johnny Cash - In Virginia ( CBS 2114 )  1965
06 - Jody Miller - Sei mein Mann ( Capitol K 22 900 )  1965
07 - The Anita Kerr Singers - Morgen schon ist es zu spдt ( Philips 6000 167 )  1975
08 - Frank Ifield - Du gehцrst mir ganz allein ( uv )  2002
09 - The Wills Brothers -  Schцnes Mдdchen vom Red River Valley ( Metronome M 397 )  1964
10 - Karl Denver - Ja der Willy muss beim Whiskey immer weinen ( Decca D 19 396 )  1963
11 - Karl Denver - Adios Bella Rosa ( Decca D 19 396 )  1963
12 - Bill Hayes - Die Ballade von Davy Crockett ( London DL 20 033 )  1955
13 - Ken Curtis - Hey Deputy ( Polydor 2371 987 )  1979
14 - Ken Curtis - Der Fremde ( Polydor 2371 987 )  1979
15 - Frank Ifield - Der alte Cowboy ( uv )  2002
16 - Bobby Bare - Good Old Tennessee ( RCA 47-9685 )  1965
17 - The Anita Kerr Singers - I'm Happy Baby ( RCA 47-9667 )  1964
18 - Lyn Anderson - Dreh dich nicht um, my Darling ( Cornet 3075, CQA 439 )  1969
19 - Bobby Bare - Das Haus auf der Sierra ( RCA 47-9645 )  1965
20 - Jim Ed Brown - Schцne Mдdchen, die kцnnen nicht treu sein ( RCA 47-9679 )  1966
21 - Johnny Cash - Wo ist zu Hause, Mama ( CBS 6271 )  1978
22 - The Anita Kerr Singers - Singapur ( RCA 47-9611 )  1964
23 - Jody Miller - Jetzt gehn' uns're Sterne auf ( Capitol K 22 900 )  1965
24 - The Anita Kerr Singers - Schцn ist der Morgen ( Philips 6000 167 )  1972
25 - Johnny Cash - Viel zu spдt ( CBS 6271 )  1978
26 - Bobby Bare - Wilder Wolf und Brauner Bдr ( RCA 47-9645 )  1965
27 - Jim Ed Brown - I Heard From A Memory Last Night ( engl & dt  ) ( RCA 47-9444 )  1965
28 - The Wills Brothers -  Dreimal genьgt in Tennessee ( Metronome M 397 )  1964
29 - Bill Hayes - Leb wohl, meine Heimat ( London DL 20 033 )  1955
30 - Skeeter Davis - G, I, Johnny ( engl & dt ) ( uv )  2002

Tommy James and the Shondells - The Psychedelic Years


Tommy James & the Shondells -- the very mention of their name, even to someone who doesn't really know their music, evokes images of dances and the kind of fun that rock & roll represented before it redefined itself on more serious terms. And between 1966 and 1969, the group enjoyed 14 Top 40 hits, most of which remain among the most eminently listenable (if not always respected) examples of pop/rock. The group was almost as much of a Top 40 radio institution of the time as Creedence Clearwater Revival, but because they weren't completely self-contained (they wrote some, but not all, or their own hits) and were more rooted in pop/rock than basic rock & roll, it took decades for writers and pop historians to look with favor upon Tommy James & the Shondells. 


Tommy James was born Thomas Jackson on April 20, 1947, in Dayton, OH. He was introduced to music at age three, when he was given a ukulele by his grandfather. He was an attractive child and was working as a model at age four, which gave him something of a taste for performing. By age nine, he'd moved to the next step in music, taking up the guitar, and by 1958, when he was 11, James began playing the electric guitar. In 1960, with his family now living in Niles, MI, 13-year-old James and a group of four friends from junior high school -- Larry Coverdale on guitar, Larry Wright on bass, Craig Villeneuve on piano, and Jim Payne on drums -- got together to play dances and parties. This was the original lineup of the Shondells, and they became good enough to earn decent money locally, and even got noticed by an outfit called Northway Sound Records, who recorded the quintet in a Tommy James original entitled "Judy" in 1962. That single didn't make much noise beyond their immediate locale, but in late 1963, the group came to the notice of a local disc jockey starting up a new label called Snap Records. They cut four sides, two of which were issued and disappeared without a trace on their first Snap single. 

The second Snap label release, "Hanky Panky," was golden, at least in the area around Niles. A Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich song that the couple had already recorded under their nom de plume, the Raindrops, as a B-side that James and company had heard done by a rival band, "Hanky Panky," had become part of James' group's stage act. It was enormously popular on-stage, and the Snap single took off locally in Niles and the surrounding area, but it never got heard any further away. James and company picked up their marbles and went home, abandoning aspirations for a recording career in favor of pursuing music part time -- the singer/guitarist took a day job at a record store and confined his music efforts to the nighttime hours. The two years that ensued, from early 1964 until 1966, saw the original Shondells break up, as members left music or were drafted. This didn't seem to make much difference until a day came when James got an urgent request from a promoter to do a concert in Pittsburgh, PA. 

Considering that the group had never even played there, he was puzzled. He soon found that the Snap Records single, "Hanky Panky," recorded back in 1963 and overlooked in Chicago and Detroit at the time, had suddenly broken out in Pittsburgh. A promoter, having found a copy of the Snap single in a used-record bin, had liked what he heard and gotten the record played locally at dances. In one of those fluky instances that made the record business in those days a complete marvel, people suddenly started requesting "Hanky Panky," and in response to the demand, bootleggers began producing it, attributed to various labels -- some sources estimate that as many as 80,000 copies were sold in Pittsburgh before the smoke cleared. 

James saw what he had to do, but he no longer had a band and was forced to recruit a new group of Shondells. The lucky winners were the Raconteurs, a local Pittsburgh quintet. They became the Shondells, with Joe Kessler on guitar, Ron Rosman on keyboards, George Magura on sax, Mike Vale on bass, and Vinnie Pietropaoli on drums; Peter Lucia and Eddie Gray, respectively, replaced Pietropaoli and Kessler, and Magura and his saxophone didn't last long in the lineup. 

From near-total obscurity, this version of Tommy James & the Shondells went to playing to audiences numbering in the thousands, and were being courted by Columbia Records and RCA-Victor. It was Morris Levy and Roulette Records, however, who outbid everybody and won the group's contract, and got a number one national hit with "Hanky Panky," in the version cut by the original group nearly three years earlier. 

Tommy James & the Shondells, revamped, revised, and reactivated, spent the next three-and-a-half years trying to keep up with their own success. "Say Am I," their second Roulette single and the first by the extant group, only got to number 21, but it was accompanied by a pretty fair Hanky Panky LP, showing off the group's prowess at covering current soul hits by the likes of the Impressions, James Brown, and Junior Walker & the All-Stars. A third single, "It's Only Love," reached number 31, but the fourth, "I Think We're Alone Now," issued in early 1967, got to number four, and the fifth, "Mirage," was another Top Ten release. The latter record was truly a spin-off of the previous hit in the most bizarre way -- according to James, "Mirage" was initially devised by playing the master of "I Think We're Alone Now" backwards. Those recordings were the work of songwriter and producer Ritchie Cordell, who became a rich source of material for the group for the remainder of their history. 

Tommy James & the Shondells were lucky enough to be making pop-oriented rock & roll in an era when most of the rest of the rock music world was trying to make more serious records and even create art (often even when the act in question had no capacity for that kind of activity). They were at a label who recognized the need to spend money in order to make money, and didn't mind the expense of issuing a new LP with each major single, despite the fact that Roulette was mostly a singles label where everything but jazz was concerned. The group members themselves were having the time of their lives playing concerts, making personal appearances, and experimenting with advancing their sound in the studio. Audiences loved their work and their records, and it only seemed to get better. 

Their songs ran almost counter to the trend among serious rock artists. "Mony Mony," a number three hit coming out in the midst of Vietnam, the psychedelic boom, and just as rock music was supposed to be turning toward higher, more serious forms, was a result of the group looking for a perfect party record and dance tune; even the name was sheer, dumb luck, a result of James spotting the Mutual of New York (MONY) illuminated sign atop their building in midtown Manhattan at a key moment in the creative process. The group did grab a piece of the prevailing style in late 1968 with "Crimson and Clover," an original by James and drummer Peter Lucia that utilized some creative sound distortion techniques. A number one hit that sold five million copies, it was the biggest single of the group's history, and yielded a highly successful follow-up LP as well -- ironically, the latter album included liner notes by Vice President Hubert Humphrey, who had gotten to know the band in the course of their performing at some of his campaign events during his 1968 run for the presidency. 

James and company were among the top pop/rock performers in the world during 1969, with two more major hits, "Sweet Cherry Wine" and "Crystal Blue Persuasion," to their credit. Indeed, their presence on the Crimson and Clover album, in addition to the title cut, helped loft that record to a 35-week run on the charts, an extraordinary achievement not only in the history of the band but also -- for a non-greatest hits album -- for Roulette Records, who weren't known as a strong album label. They also began experimenting more with new sounds during this period, most notably on their next album, Cellophane Symphony. The latter record, whose release was delayed for four months because of the extraordinary sales of Crimson and Clover, had its share of basic rock & roll sounds but also plunged into progressive/psychedelic music with a vengeance, most notably on "Cellophane Symphony," a Moog-dominated track that sounds closer to Pink Floyd than anyone ever imagined possible. Cellophane Symphony sold well without breaking any records by its predecessor, and proved in the process that Tommy James & the Shondells could compete in virtually any rock genre. The only miscalculation made by the band was their declining an invitation to perform at Woodstock; the mere credit, coupled with perhaps an appearance in the movie or on the album, might have enhanced their credibility with the counterculture audience. 

The end of the Shondells' history came not from any real decision, but simply their desire to take a break in 1970, after four years of hard work and a lot of great times. The moment also seemed right -- James was getting involved in other projects and moving in other directions, including writing and producing records for acts like the Brooklyn-based band Alive and Kicking, whose "Tighter and Tighter" got to number seven, and his own solo recordings. The Shondells continued working together for a time as well, under the name Hog Heaven, cutting one album for Roulette before withdrawing back to the Pittsburgh area where they'd started. 

James went through a lot of different sounds on his own records, including country (My Head, My Bed & My Red Guitar) and Christian music (Christian of the World), and charted in the Top Ten one last time in 1971 with "Draggin' the Line," although he also saw more limited success for another two years with records such as "I'm Comin' Home" and "Celebration." 

In the mid-'70s, he made a jump from Roulette Records, where he'd based his career for nearly a decade, to Fantasy Records, and he later recorded for Millennium Records. Following his 1980 Top 20 hit, "Three Times in Love," he resurfaced as a concert artist playing his old hits as well as new songs, although some of these shows were marred by reports of late arrivals and less-than-ideal performances; he has since reestablished a record as a serious crowd-pleasing act, cutting records anew with Cordell and even releasing a live hits collection in 1998. 

Tommy James & the Shondells have even achieved something that they saw relatively little of in their own time -- respect. In the years 1966-1970, they were regarded as a bubblegum act and part of the scenery by the few discerning critical voices around, but in the '80s, their music revealed its staying power in fresh recordings (and hits) by Joan Jett, Billy Idol, and Tiffany, with "Crimson and Clover," "Mony Mony," and "I Think We're Alone Now," respectively; indeed, in one of those odd chart events that would have seemed more likely in the '60s, in 1987, Tiffany's version of "I Think We're Alone Now" was replaced at the number one spot after two weeks by Billy Idol's rendition of "Mony Mony." Rhino Records' reissue of the Crimson and Clover and Cellophane Symphony albums, in addition to greatest-hits collections and a survey of James' solo recordings from the decade 1970-1980, also seemed to speak for the group's credibility, and a 1997 Westside Records double-CD, It's a New Vibration, offering unreleased songs from the '60s as well as all of the key single tracks, confirmed the level of seriousness with which the group was perceived. 

Tommy James was no Mick Jagger or Jim Morrison, to be sure, and his songwriting -- which was usually not solo, in any case -- lacked the downbeat, serious tone or the little mystical touches of John Fogerty. He's usually put more comfortably in the company of such figures as Paul Revere & the Raiders' Mark Lindsay, or with Johnny Rivers or Tommy Roe, in the middle or early part of the '60s. But from 1968 through 1970, when artists like Jagger, Fogerty, and Morrison were in their heyday, Tommy James & the Shondells sold more singles than any other pop act in the world, many of them written, co-written, or at least chosen by James. The mere fact that he released a concert DVD in the fall of 2000 is loud testament to the power and impact of his work four decades into his career.




TOMMY JAMES &THE SHONDELLS 
 Crystal Blue Symphonies: The Psychedelic Years




V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.63 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.6


Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.63

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 6

01 - The Searchers - Verzeih My Love (stereo) ( Vogue DV 14 338 )  1965
02 - Ian & The Zodias - Bitte komm wieder ( Fontana 269 325 )  1995
03 - The Rockin' Berries - Ich liebe dich ( Piccadilly NPL 38 013 )  1964
04 - The Swinging Blue Jeans - Good Golly Miss Molly ( Electrola E 22 734 )  1964
05 - Georgie Fame - Yeah, Yeh, Yeh ( Columbia C 22 909 )  1965
06 - Casey Jones & The Governors - Bumble Bee ( Golden 12-37 )  1966
07 - The Searchers - Farmer John ( Vogue DV 14 130 )  1964
08 - Manfred Mann - Pretty Baby, weine nicht ( Electrola E 22 892 )  1964
09 - Brian Diamond & The Cutters - Keine Angst, Little Woman ( Vogue DV 14 336 )  1966
10 - The Honeycombs - Du sollst nicht traurig sein ( Vogue DV 14 210 )  1964
11 - Benny - Heut' oder nie ( uv )  2001
12 - The Liverpool Beats - Boys ( Vogue DV 14 201 )  1964
13 - The Searchers - Liebe ( Vogue DV 14 116 )  1963
14 - Jimmy & The Rackets - Wie du ( Elite Spezial 9423 )  1964
15 - The Swinging Blue Jeans - Das ist vorbei ( Columbia C 22 870 )  1964
16 - The Flamingos - Glьcklich wie noch nie ( Vogue DV 14 158 )  1964
17 - The Merseybeats - Nur du allein ( Fontana 269 310 TF )  1964
18 - Georgie Fame - Humpty Dumpty ( Columbia C 22 909 )  1965
19 - The Sorrows - Sie war mein Girl ( PYE DV 14 449 )  1965
20 - The Searchers - Sьss ist sie ( Vogue DV 14 116 )  1963
21 - The Liverpool Beats - Big Bad John ( Vogue DV 14 173 )  1963
22 - Brian Diamond & The Cutters - Daisy Lu ( Vogue DV 14 336 )  1966
23 - The Swinging Blue Jeans - Tutti Frutti ( Columbia C 22 870 )  1964
24 - The Searchers - Wenn ich dich seh ( Vogue DV 14 338 )  1965

V.A.- Heimatliche Klaenge vol.62 - 1000 Native Sounds vol.5


Heimatliche Klaenge - Native Sounds
vol.62

Amerikaner & Briten singen deutsch - Tausend Nadelstiche Vol 5


01 - Eden Kane - Nimm das Mдdchen ( Decca D 19 404 )  1963
02 - Craig Douglas - Oh, das wдr schцn ( Decca DL 25 089 )  1962
03 - Adam Faith - Wie heisst dein Boy ( Odeon O 22 804 )  1965
04 - John Leyton - Wann bist du bei mir ( Electrola E 22 089 )  1962
05 - Jimmy Justice -  Lindy Lou ( Vogue DV 14 074 )  1963
06 - Adam Faith - Oh Caroline ( uv )  2001
07 - Ken Morris - Caroline ( NH 52 168 )  1963
08 - Eden Kane - Meine grosse Liebe ( Decca D 19 404 )  1963
09 - Dick Scott - Immer wieder komme ich zu dir zurьck ( Telefunken U 55 918 )  1966
10 - Vince Hill - Der Platz, der dir gehцrt bleibt frei ( Columbia C 23 568 )  1967
11 - Ken Morris - Die Frau meiner Trдume ( NH 52 409 )  1965
12 - John Leyton - Eine kann meine nur sein ( Electrola E 22 540 )  1963
13 - Jimmy Justice - Vergiss die Liebe nicht ( Vogue DV 14 095 )  1963
14 - Alan Corb - Mr Kiss Kiss Bang ( NH 52 601 )  1965
15 - Dick Scott - Alles will ich kaufen ( Telefunken U 55 918 )  1966
16 - Adam Faith - Ich bin verliebt ( Odeon O 22 804 )  1965
17 - John Leyton -Einmal ist keinmal ( Electrola E 22 540 )  1963
18 - Jimmy Justice - Die Kuckucksuhr vom Schwarzwaldtal ( Vogue DV 14 074 )  1963
19 - Vince Hill - It's A Long Way To Georgia ( Columbia C 23 568 )  1967
20 - Craig Douglas - Lass mich nie allein ( Decca DL 25 089 )  1962
21 - Vince Hill - Diese Nacht mit Nathalie ( Columbia C 24 001 )  1969
22 - Ken Morris - Mexico Strand ( NH 52 409 )  1965
23 - Alan Corb - Feuerball ( NH 52 601 )  1965
24 - Jimmy Justice - Der treue Husar ( Vogue DV 14 095 )  1963

Dave Berry - Greatest Hits


Briefly a big star in Britain in the mid-'60s, Dave Berry faced the same dilemma as several other British teen idols of the era: R&B was obviously nearest and dearest to his heart, but he needed to record blatantly pop material to make the hit parade. It was also obvious that Berry was in fact much more suited toward pop ballads than rough-and-tumble R&B, regardless of his personal preferences. At his peak, his output was divided between hard R&B/rockers and straight pop. Help from ace session players like Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones notwithstanding, his smooth voice was frankly ill-equipped to deliver the goods with anything close to the same panache as Mick Jagger or Eric Burdon on the bluesier items. He made a rather good go of it, on the other hand, with romantic pop/rock ballads, hitting the British Top Ten with "The Crying Game" (1964), Bobby Goldsboro's "Little Things" (1965), and the excruciatingly sentimental "Mama" (1966). "This Strange Effect," written by Ray Davies (though not released by the Kinks), was a huge European hit for him in 1965 as well. 



Berry's voice was not exactly teeming with character and he never made the slightest impression on the U.S. market, but the best of his material is quite pleasant period fare. He remains well regarded in his homeland, where the Sex Pistols unexpectedly covered his toughest track, "Don't Gimme No Lip Child." Even more unexpectedly, "The Crying Game" brought Berry's voice to his biggest international audience ever in 1992, when it was used as the theme song for one of the year's most successful films.



1. This Strange Effect (2:29)
2.  Little Things (2:23)
3. Baby It's You (2:27)
4.  Memphis Tennessee (2:24)
5.  Go On Home (2:04)
6.I'm Gonna Take You There
7. If You Wait For Love
8. The Crying Game
9. Diddley Daddy
10. St. James Infirmary
11. My Baby Left Me
12. You're Gonna Need Somebody
13. Hoochie Coochie Man
14. Don't Gimme No Lip Child
15. Now
16. One Heart Between Two


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